Texas

  • December 02, 2022

    Biden Tells Justices Texas Judge Erred Axing Debt Plan

    The Biden administration on Friday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to stay a Texas federal judge's ruling that struck down his student debt relief plan, arguing that the lower court relied on a claim that wasn't even asserted by the program's challengers.

  • December 02, 2022

    Embattled Ex-Vitol Oil Trader Hit With More FCPA Charges

    Prosecutors filed new Foreign Corrupt Practices Act charges on Friday against a former Vitol Group oil trader who's accused of funneling bribes to Petroecuador officials to secure a $300 million fuel contract, claiming he engaged in similar crimes with Mexican officials as well.

  • December 02, 2022

    States Lean On La. Title 42 Order To Enter Asylum-Seekers' Suit

    Red states urged a D.C. federal judge to include them in an asylum-seeker suit that won the end of a Trump-era policy authorizing migrants' swift expulsion, saying Friday the case threatened to upend their own hard-won court order forcing the policy's continuation.

  • December 02, 2022

    Biden Goes Too Far With Debt Plan, 17 States Tell Justices

    A group of 17 states led by Utah and Ohio asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reject the Biden administration's request to lift the Eighth Circuit's nationwide injunction on his student debt relief plan, saying the president can't use his position to sidestep the law to fulfill a campaign promise.

  • December 02, 2022

    Lewis Brisbois Trademark Suit Moving Forward In Texas Court

    Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP's trademark infringement suit against three Texans will proceed in court after a hearing Friday in which U.S. District Judge Keith P. Ellison said it was "hard to believe" that one of the attorneys filed cases using the firm's name "with a clear conscience and clear heart."

  • December 02, 2022

    Astros Owner, Comcast Drop Suit Over Broadcast Deal

    The owner of the Houston Astros baseball team has agreed to drop its claims in Texas Supreme Court against broadcasters Comcast and NBCUniversal in a long-running suit over allegations that it was cheated when it bought the organization almost a decade ago.

  • December 02, 2022

    5th Circ. Won't Rehear Texas Billionaire's COVID Hotel Fight

    A Fifth Circuit panel on Friday denied a Texas billionaire's request for a rehearing after it found a county judge did have the authority to place restrictions on hotels in March 2020 at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • December 02, 2022

    Energy Co. Asks Texas Justices To Undo $13M Royalty Loss

    Samson Exploration urged the Texas Supreme Court to grant its petition for review and reverse a judgment ordering it to pay more than $13 million in contract late fees in an oil and gas lease dispute, saying the justices should rightly align Texas with the majority of states in regard to how interest is imposed.

  • December 02, 2022

    Interest Rates Doom Lender, Crypto Winter Persists

    Rising interest rates forced a reverse mortgage lender into Chapter 11, cryptocurrency platform BlockFi succumbed to the downfall of exchange FTX Trading, and FTX itself faced calls for an examination of its collapse. This is the week in bankruptcy.

  • December 02, 2022

    Shell Faces Religious Bias Suit Over COVID Vaccine Mandate

    A Shell worker hit one of the oil giant's subsidiaries with a Texas federal court suit claiming his religious rights were violated when the company refused to grant him an exemption to its requirement that all offshore workers get vaccinated against COVID-19.

  • December 02, 2022

    Texas Gov. Sends Fairchild Price Atty To Appellate Court

    Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has appointed a Fairchild Price Haley & Smith LLP partner with experience in product liability, patent law, medical malpractice and transportation disputes to the Sixth Court of Appeals in Texarkana.

  • December 02, 2022

    ​​​​​​​Texas Justices Order Medical Test In Carbon Monoxide Case

    The Texas Supreme Court said on Friday that six people alleging they suffered irreversible brain injuries from breathing in carbon monoxide at a San Antonio apartment complex should submit to a medical exam the landlord has demanded.

  • December 02, 2022

    Injury Suit Against Hilton Hotel Over Drunken Patron Tossed

    A federal judge has dismissed a suit against a Hilton hotel in Texas that allegedly overserved a bar patron who later ran over her friend in the parking lot, ruling the friend's lawsuit was untimely delivered to the defendants.

  • December 02, 2022

    Seasoned Litigator Joins Baker Botts In Dallas From Foley

    Baker Botts LLP has added a partner to its litigation department in Dallas who brings decades of combined experience as an in-house counsel and in private practice.

  • December 02, 2022

    Norton Rose Gains Energy Deal Pro From Porter Hedges

    Norton Rose Fulbright LLP has added a transactions lawyer to its energy, infrastructure and resources practice in Houston who brings considerable experience in the industry.

  • December 02, 2022

    Alex Jones Files Ch. 11 In Wake Of Sandy Hook Judgments

    Right-wing conspiracy-monger Alex Jones filed for Chapter 11 protection early Friday in Texas bankruptcy court, listing as his largest creditors family members of the 2012 Sandy Hook school shooting victims who obtained defamation judgments against him exceeding $1 billion.

  • December 01, 2022

    CarMax Inks Deal With Dozens Of AGs Over Recall Disclosure

    Used car dealer CarMax Inc. on Thursday reached an agreement with 36 attorneys general, promising to provide consumers with information about safety recalls on critical vehicle parts before selling them and setting what New York Attorney General Letitia James called "a new industry standard" for used car dealers.

  • December 01, 2022

    Texas Supreme Court Mulls Testimony in $4M Brain Injury Suit

    A former auto dealership employee who was injured in an accident might not get a new trial despite a witness' comments about her alcohol use at work, as a Texas Supreme Court justice said Thursday that the trial judge had given "one heck of a curative instruction" about the testimony.

  • December 01, 2022

    IP Forecast: Jury To Hear Apple-Ericsson Licensing Battle

    A federal jury in Marshall, Texas, next week will hear long-simmering arguments from Apple that Ericsson isn't licensing its assortment of cellular patents considered essential to 4G and 5G standards at fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory rates.

  • December 01, 2022

    Texas Land Co. Investors Call Share Expansion A Power Grab

    The biggest shareholders in Texas Pacific Land Corp., one of Texas' largest landowners, have alleged in a Delaware Chancery Court filing that the company is trying to dilute their power with a suit attempting to force the investor group to back a move expanding the number of company stocks.

  • December 01, 2022

    Uvalde Shooting Survivors Seek $27B Over Police Response

    A proposed class of survivors of the May shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, is suing the school district, its police department, and state officials for $27 billion, saying survivors were "emotionally maimed" by the shooting that killed 19 students and two teachers.

  • December 01, 2022

    Jerry Jones Photo Is Hit To NFL's Image Amid Race Bias Suit

    The revelation of a 1957 photo in which then-teenaged Jerry Jones — now the owner of the Dallas Cowboys — was watching a violent reaction to school integration is yet another race-related headache for both Jones and the NFL as the league grapples with a proposed class action alleging racial bias in hiring practices.

  • December 01, 2022

    Marathon Oil's $10.5M Lease Fight Can Move Forward

    A Texas federal judge denied ShenHai LLC's bid to toss a $10.5 million contract dispute brought against it by Marathon Oil Co., finding the court had jurisdiction over the case under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act.

  • December 01, 2022

    Trade Groups Push To Topple CFPB Anti-Bias Exam Policy

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and several banking trade groups have asked a Texas federal court to rule on their challenge to a Consumer Financial Protection Bureau exam policy expanding its anti-discrimination scrutiny, pushing for a swift end to what they say is costly overreach by the agency.

  • December 01, 2022

    Parler Wants Tech Maker's 'P' TM Suit Thrown Out For Good

    Social media app Parler has urged a Nevada federal judge to snuff out a business technology provider's trademark suit over the app's "P" logo, arguing that consumers wouldn't be confused by the companies' purportedly similar marks since they don't offer related services.

Expert Analysis

  • Reviewing Separation Agreement Compliance Before Layoffs

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    As a potential recession triggers layoff considerations, employers should begin reviewing their separation agreement templates to ensure they include the desired protections for the employer while complying with applicable, and recently amended, state laws, says Victoria Hubona at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Safeguarding Attorneys' Greatest Asset: Our Mental Health

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    Attorneys who understand that mental fitness is their most valuable characteristic should prioritize mental health care accordingly, including with certain activities they may not realize qualify as self-care, says Wendy Robbins at Holland & Knight.

  • 5th Circ. Class Action Rulings Reflect Post-TransUnion Trends

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    In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2021 TransUnion v. Ramirez decision, Fifth Circuit case trends this year highlight the importance of closely evaluating standing challenges where the injury-in-fact is questionable, even where a statutory violation might exist, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Could State Ownership Solve US Cannabis Policy Issues?

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    Provincial cannabis wholesalers in Canada are enjoying huge profits, begging the question of whether a government-owned cannabis model could eventually be replicated in the U.S. to tackle issues ranging from social equity to overproduction — but this would undoubtedly introduce other complex challenges, says Hilary Bricken at Harris Bricken.

  • Why The EPA Has Made Little Progress On EJ Litigation

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    Although the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has taken numerous steps to promote environmental justice goals, recent court cases show little progress in achieving those goals through judicial enforcement — and the lack of such cases may not be the agency's fault, says Jeffrey Corey at Parsons Behle.

  • Pending High Court ICWA Decision Holds Broad Implications

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    Oral argument in Brackeen v. Haaland — a child welfare case currently before the U.S. Supreme Court — has called attention to complex interplay between the case and other tribal and racial issues, indicating that consequences will affect Congress' ability to fulfill its trust obligations to tribes, as well as diversity programs that include Native Americans, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Property Policies Could Cover Organized Retail Crime Losses

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    Following a recent surge in organized retail crime, policyholders can look to case law that suggests they may be able to skirt property policy loss exclusions if they can produce evidence of theft, says Micah Skidmore at Haynes Boone.

  • Opinion

    Law Schools Are Right To Steer Clear Of US News Rankings

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    By opting out of participating in the U.S. News & World Report annual rankings, law schools abandon a profoundly flawed system and free up their resources to adapt to the tsunami of changes overtaking the profession, says Nicholas Allard at Jacksonville University College of Law.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funders Seek Transparency In Disclosure Debate

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    Litigation funders want to correct the record on calls for funding disclosure in the name of transparency, as this purported justification obscures the disclosure's adverse effects — prejudicing plaintiffs' cases and discouraging the assertion of meritorious legal claims, say Dai Wai Chin Feman and William Weisman at Parabellum Capital.

  • 5 Principles For Better Professional Development Programs

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    The pandemic and ensuing "great resignation" have resulted in a more transient legal work force, but law firms can use effective professional development programs to bridge a cultural gap with new associates and stem associate attrition, says Matthew Woods at Robins Kaplan.

  • Series

    My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Practice With Passion

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    First Circuit Judge Gustavo Gelpí recalls how Suffolk University Law School's Joseph Glannon taught the importance of the law as both a tool and a profession, and that those who wish to practice law successfully must do so with love, enthusiasm and passion.

  • How To Prep For Calif. Social Media Content Moderation Law

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    California's new social media content moderation law reflects an overarching desire to reduce or address the spread of harmful information — and to comply, companies should review their moderation practices and establish tracking mechanisms for data collection, say Marc Mayer and Stacey Chuvaieva at Mitchell Silberberg.

  • Exculpation Clause Ruling May Dissuade Some Ch. 11 Filings

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    Highland Capital’s recent bankruptcy ruling narrows the scope of exculpation provisions permissible in the Fifth and Tenth Circuits, which not only reveals another circuit split, but also may discourage large Chapter 11 filings in those circuits and lead to diminished creditor recoveries, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • State AG Consumer Protection Shift Isn't An Election Fad

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    We are starting to see the first signs of a new state attorney general consumer enforcement paradigm emerge — with creative use of most favored nation clauses as structural tools — and that is unlikely to end when the last ballot is counted for the 2022 election, says O.H. Skinner at Alliance for Consumers.

  • Miss. Ruling Deepens Jurisdiction Split In Vape Battery Cases

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    The Mississippi Supreme Court’s recent decision in Dilworth v. LG Chem demonstrates that foreign entities whose products enter the state’s nascent medical cannabis market can be sued there — deepening a judicial divide over personal jurisdiction in exploding vape battery cases, say Slates Veazey and Jaime Weida at Bradley Arant.

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