Transportation

  • December 13, 2017

    DOT 'Like,' Retweet Violated Anti-Lobbying Law, GAO Finds

    The U.S. Department of Transportation violated a government anti-lobbying law when it retweeted and liked a tweet from Forbes Chairman Steve Forbes in July urging followers to “tell Congress to pass" pending legislation to overhaul the nation’s air traffic control system, a congressional watchdog said Wednesday.

  • December 13, 2017

    Rubber Co. To Pay $12M To End Auto Parts Price-Fixing Suit

    A Japanese rubber company has agreed to pay a group of automobile dealerships $11.9 million to settle claims of price-fixing and bid-rigging in the auto parts market, according to a deal that was preliminarily approved by a Michigan federal judge Tuesday.

  • December 13, 2017

    DC Circ. Gives Enviros 2nd Shot To Fight $2.2B Pipeline

    The Sierra Club will be allowed to refile a suit against the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission aiming to stall construction on the $2.2 billion Nexus pipeline after the nonprofit had to pull its initial petition, the D.C. Circuit said Wednesday.

  • December 12, 2017

    Shipping Co. Battles Qualcomm's $1.8M Fees Win In Fed. Circ.

    R&L Carriers argued to the Federal Circuit in an opening brief Monday that an Ohio federal court abused its discretion by awarding Qualcomm $1.8 million in attorneys’ fees in the patent infringement case R&L brought against the company after finding the case is exceptional under Octane Fitness.

  • December 12, 2017

    Audi, Bosch Say Gas-Vehicle Emissions Suit Is Too Vague

    VW, Audi and Bosch urged a California federal court Monday to throw out a proposed class action alleging they conspired to install illegal “defeat devices” in various gasoline-fueled vehicles, saying the drivers bringing the suit are attempting to piggyback off similar cases over diesel-fueled vehicles.

  • December 12, 2017

    MoFo, Boies Attys To Answer Waymo Queries In Uber IP Suit

    Attorneys from Morrison & Foerster LLP and Boies Schiller Flexner LLP will answer select written questions in Waymo’s lawsuit accusing Uber of stealing self-driving trade secrets after Uber objected to their depositions on the heels of a trial postponement over allegedly withheld evidence, according to an order filed in California federal court on Tuesday. 

  • December 12, 2017

    Squire Patton Adds Ex-Polsinelli Trial Attys In Phoenix

    Squire Patton Boggs LLP announced on Tuesday it has expanded the litigation team at its Phoenix office with the addition of two trial lawyers from Polsinelli PC with extensive experience successfully litigating complex product liability, commercial, insurance and personal injury matters.

  • December 12, 2017

    Engineering Co. Blasts Tanzania's Bid To Nix $41M Road Suit

    An English civil engineering company Monday urged a D.C. federal court not to dismiss its $41.4 million suit seeking to enforce two foreign judgments against Tanzania over a road rehabilitation project, fighting the country’s claim of sovereign immunity.

  • December 12, 2017

    DOT Escapes Enviro Suit Over Review Of Oil Spill Plans

    A Michigan federal judge on Tuesday granted a quick win to the U.S. Department of Transportation in a suit accusing it of shirking its responsibilities to review spill response plans for certain oil facilities, agreeing with the agency that the environmental group that brought the suit didn’t have standing.

  • December 12, 2017

    Enviros Ask DC Circ. To Rehear EPA Highway Pollution Case

    The Sierra Club and three Denver-area community groups have asked for an en banc rehearing of their challenge of allegedly weakened federal guidance for air pollution tests on planned highway projects, saying a D.C. Circuit panel’s decision tossing the case for lack of standing conflicts with D.C. Circuit precedent.

  • December 12, 2017

    Rosen Asks To Lead Tesla Shareholders In Stock-Drop Suit

    The Rosen Law Firm PA made a push Monday to lead Tesla shareholders in a California stock-drop suit alleging the electric car maker failed to disclose it was experiencing production delays on its Model 3 sedan, supposedly resulting in a nearly 4 percent drop in its stock price.

  • December 12, 2017

    The Top 10 Trademark Rulings Of 2017

    From Cheerios box trade dress to generic “googling” to a blockbuster U.S. Supreme Court decision, 2017 was another bumper year for major rulings in trademark law. Here are the 10 you need to remember.

  • December 12, 2017

    Pa. State Sen. Seeks To Increase Pipeline Safety

    A Pennsylvania state senator said Monday that he plans to introduce legislation to improve oil and gas pipeline safety in the wake of the damage to water sources from Sunoco Pipeline’s work on its controversial Mariner East 2 project.

  • December 12, 2017

    3rd Circ. Urged To Revive SEPTA Background Check Suit

    The Third Circuit was urged during oral arguments on Tuesday to revive class claims accusing the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority of failing to provide job applicants with a chance to respond to consumer reports detailing criminal histories that the agency said disqualified them from employment.

  • December 12, 2017

    Towing Service Says Insurer's Fraud Claims Are Lies

    A Pennsylvania towing and environmental services firm has sued IAT Insurance Co. in state court in a dispute over a claim from an oil-spill cleanup, alleging that the insurer made defamatory statements when it suggested in an email that the company engaged in fraud.

  • December 12, 2017

    Senate Dems Lob Plagiarism Charge At Trump Enviro Pick

    Senate Democrats on Tuesday accused President Donald Trump's controversial pick to lead the White House's Council on Environmental Quality of plagiarism, saying several written responses to their questions were directly lifted from answers previously given by Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt and EPA Assistant Administrator Bill Wehrum.

  • December 11, 2017

    Has Litigation Finance Shed Its Stigma?

    Once a taboo topic in the halls of BigLaw, litigation finance is winning over converts. And the peer pressure is building for rival law firms to join the bandwagon.

  • December 11, 2017

    Why Investors Are Taking The Leap To 3rd-Party Funding

    They often don’t know exactly what they’re buying, and there’s an ever-present chance they could come up empty in a given case. Here’s why investors are flocking to litigation finance anyway.

  • December 11, 2017

    What Your Colleagues Think Of Litigation Finance

    We asked, and you answered. Here are the results of Law360’s inaugural survey on third-party legal funding.

  • December 11, 2017

    Tesla Wins Info In Fight Over Direct Sales Ban In Mich.

    Three Michigan auto dealers must hand over information about their lobbying efforts supporting a state ban on car manufacturers selling vehicles directly to consumers, a federal judge ruled Monday, rejecting their attempt to dodge a July order in Tesla’s lawsuit alleging the ban creates an unconstitutional monopoly.

Expert Analysis

  • How DOE's 'Grid Resiliency' Policy May Impact Gas Markets

    Chip Moldenhauer

    At the behest of the U.S. Department of Energy, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is soon expected to release an interim rule that subsidizes power plants that hold 90 days of fuel supply on site — i.e., coal-fired and nuclear plants — and effectively penalizes gas-fired plants. But FERC has an opportunity to mitigate the threat to gas-fired generators, says Chip Moldenhaeur of LawIQ.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: The Siemens Lesson — Tillerson Is Right

    solmssen.jpg

    Since its whopping $800 million Foreign Corrupt Practices Act settlement in 2008, Siemens cleaned up — and it has “cleaned up” in its long-standing competition with General Electric. How? As Secretary of State Rex Tillerson reportedly told President Donald Trump, you don’t need to pay bribes to succeed in international business, says Peter Y. Solmssen, former general counsel of Siemens.

  • High Court's Latest Travel Ban Ruling Lacks Details

    Tahanie Aboushi

    On Monday the U.S. Supreme Court lifted all stays on the third version of President Trump's travel ban. The paragraph-long ruling was devoid of limitations on the wide discretion available when deciding whether or not to bar an individual, which essentially leaves U.S. customs agents, defense counsel and those affected by the order to decipher the logistics as they go, says Tahanie Aboushi of The Aboushi Law Firm.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: The Rise In International Enforcement

    Scarboro.jpg

    The 2008 Siemens matter — then the largest sanction ever imposed in a Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement action — set the stage for future cross-collaboration in global anti-corruption enforcement, say Cheryl Scarboro, former chief of the FCPA Unit at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, and Diana Wielocha of Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: Highlights From The 1st Corporate Trial

    Robert Feldman

    The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act case of U.S. v. Harris Corp. was tried in March 1991 — so long ago that pretty much only the parties and counsel remember it. With a smile, I’ve just about given up correcting people who say their case is "the only FCPA case ever to be tried,” says Robert Feldman of Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: The Strange Case That Started It All

    Burton Wiand

    At the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in April 1978, we filed a case against Page Airways and envisioned the trial of a precedent-setting enforcement action that would have defined Foreign Corrupt Practices Act standards at an early stage. Instead, the matter was settled under circumstances that I am sure are unique in SEC history, says Burton Wiand of Wiand Guerra King PA.

  • How ITC Applied Inter Partes Review Estoppel In Ford Case

    Bryan J. Vogel

    The U.S. International Trade Commission's initial determination in Certain Hybrid Vehicles is significant because it continues the ITC trend of issuing patent owner-friendly rulings in spite of conflicting Patent Trial and Appeal Board rulings, say Bryan J. Vogel and Derrick J. Carman of Robins Kaplan LLP.

  • Trump’s 'Buy American' Order Already Packs A Punch

    Howard Roth

    The secretary of commerce report on the "Buy American and Hire American" executive order was due at the White House on Nov. 24. Though the report is not yet public, it is in the foreground of the debate on legislative and regulatory actions, and it is changing the landscape for many organizations, says Howard Roth of Oles Morrison Rinker & Baker LLP.

  • A Critical Review Of The 1st Drone Preemption Case

    Stephen Migala

    There is an objective and fundamental flaw in the recent Singer v. Newton opinion, which involved a city law restricting drones and related questions of federal preemption. The Massachusetts federal court's decision was based in large part on a miscodifed part of the U.S. Code that is not actually the law, says Stephen Migala of Winston & Strawn LLP.

  • The Billing Evolution: How Far Along Is Your Firm?

    Sharon Quaintance

    In a recent study, 20 out of 25 law firms surveyed have made billing process improvement a top priority for 2018. Firms can foster consistency and increase efficiency at all stages of their billing cycle by focusing on a few specific procedures, say Sharon Quaintance and Christine Indiano at HBR Consulting.