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Transportation

  • October 17, 2018

    Hertz Says Consumer's Robocalls Suit Too Narrow For Class

    The Hertz Corp. has asked an Illinois federal judge to dismiss a consumer's proposed class action alleging invasion of privacy based on robocalls the company made to him when his mother kept a car weeks past due, saying the circumstances are too specific to represent a group.

  • October 17, 2018

    American Airlines Sues Expedia Over 'Advantage' Trademarks

    American Airlines hit Expedia with a trademark lawsuit in Texas federal court Tuesday over the booking site’s launch of an “Add On Advantage” program, saying the name is confusingly similar to the airline’s “AAdvantage” rewards brand.

  • October 16, 2018

    Duck Boat Cos.' Inaction Caused Deadly Crash, Jury Told

    Counsel for 42 victims of a “duck boat” crash that killed five people told a Seattle jury during opening statements Tuesday that the crash happened because of an axle defect that was improperly handled by amphibious vehicle tour company Ride the Ducks International and its Seattle licensee, while the companies blamed each other for not making a recommended repair to the vehicle. 

  • October 16, 2018

    United Pilots Win Cert. Over Military Benefits Denial

    An Illinois federal judge on Tuesday granted certification to pilots accusing United Airlines and Continental Airlines of denying sick and vacation time, as well as full pension payments, to employees on military leave, saying that after the airlines merged, some pilots were allegedly treated differently and that could be enough to prove a violation of the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act. 

  • October 16, 2018

    FCC Commissioners Support Plan To Reopen 5.9 GHz Rules

    FCC Commissioners Jessica Rosenworcel and Michael O’Rielly offered bipartisan support Tuesday for a trade association’s plan that would rethink the allocation of the 5.9 GHz spectrum band for automotive safety features and use it to power Wi-Fi and unlicensed devices.

  • October 16, 2018

    Uber Gets Car Crash Negligence Suit Sent To NY

    An Illinois federal judge has transferred to the Southern District of New York a negligence suit filed by a Chicago man who was paralyzed when his Uber ride crashed, saying most of the case's "material events" happened in the Big Apple.

  • October 16, 2018

    Deals Rumor Mill: Uber, Lyft, Tribune

    Proposals have valued Uber at a whopping $120 billion in its initial public offering, Lyft tapped JPMorgan Chase & Co., Credit Suisse and Jefferies as underwriters on its IPO, and Hicks Equity Partners is eyeing Tribune Media and its nearly four dozen TV stations.

  • October 16, 2018

    Mitsuba To Pay $4.6M To Bow Out Of Car Parts MDL

    Mitsuba Corp. has agreed to shell out $4.6 million and cooperate with its accusers to escape claims in sprawling multidistrict litigation alleging it was part of a conspiracy to fix prices on two types of auto parts, direct buyers told a Michigan federal judge in a pair of proposed settlements on Monday.

  • October 16, 2018

    Duck Boat Owner Says Law Limits Liability Over Fatal Sinking

    The owner of an amphibious “duck boat” has filed an action in Missouri federal court seeking to limit its liability over the deadly July sinking that claimed the lives of 17 tourists by citing a federal maritime law enacted in the 19th century.

  • October 16, 2018

    Uber Reaches $1.3M Deal In Drivers' Collective FLSA Action

    Uber Technologies Inc. will pay $1.3 million to settle Fair Labor Standards Act claims from more than 5,000 drivers who aren’t bound by arbitration agreements and alleged the ride-hailing giant misclassified them as independent contractors instead of employees, according to a North Carolina federal court filing Tuesday.

  • October 16, 2018

    Washington Pays $28M To Head Off Crash Survivor's Trial

    The state of Washington will pay $28 million to settle claims that its failure to bring a highway pillar up to legal standard was responsible for crash injuries that made a 15-year-old girl a quadriplegic.

  • October 16, 2018

    Philly UberBlack Drivers Press 3rd Circ. For Employee Status

    Philadelphia-based Uber limo drivers told the Third Circuit on Monday that they're similar to migrant workers who are compensated at the whim of an economically dominant entity, meaning they should be recognized as employees entitled to proper wages under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

  • October 16, 2018

    The Path To Becoming A Supreme Court Advocate

    A look at the careers of attorneys who have dominated oral advocacy at the U.S. Supreme Court over the last decade shows a similar path for men and women, with a few key differences. Here’s how the top 10 male and female advocates stack up.

  • October 16, 2018

    $20M SEC Settlements For Musk, Tesla Approved By Judge

    A New York federal judge on Tuesday signed off on a pair of settlements that will see Tesla Inc. and its embattled CEO Elon Musk pay the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission $20 million apiece to end claims that Musk misled investors in tweets about taking the Silicon Valley-based electric car maker private.

  • October 16, 2018

    VW Can't Duck Court Rules In Robocall Suit, Class Says

    A certified class of Volkswagen owners suing over robocalls has urged a California federal court not to bend its rule restricting parties to only one summary judgment motion, saying the German automaker already wasted its only chance.

  • October 16, 2018

    Audi Fined $925M In Germany Over Diesel Emissions

    German authorities on Tuesday hit Volkswagen’s luxury division, Audi AG, with a $925 million fine for selling cars rigged to pass emissions tests despite their emissions being higher than allowable standards.

  • October 16, 2018

    Energy Policy Goes To The Polls In Western US States

    A carbon tax in Washington and renewable energy mandates in Arizona and Nevada are part of a "green wall" of ballot initiatives in western U.S. states that could have significant impacts on the energy sector, experts say. Here, Law360 highlights major energy-related state referendums headed to the polls in November.

  • October 15, 2018

    NJ Judge Tosses Suit Over 'Back To The Future' Car Royalties

    A New Jersey federal judge has scrapped a lawsuit over royalties a DeLorean automobile dealer received from the car logo’s use in merchandising materials for the “Back to the Future” film franchise, ruling Friday that the suit was barred by a settlement resolving related litigation launched by the widow of the car’s visionary.

  • October 15, 2018

    Gender Disparity At The High Court: How Top Law Firms Measure Up

    For the women at elite law firms, an enduring gender gap among advocates can create a high hurdle for their high court ambitions. Here, Law360 looks at the law firms where women score Supreme Court arguments, and where they don’t.

  • October 15, 2018

    Pipeline Co. Wants $1.5M In Atty Fees For Frivolous Suit

    The Houston Pipe Line Co. LP asked a Florida federal court Friday for $1.5 million in attorneys’ fees for having to fight off what it called an “objectively frivolous claim” from Continental Holdings Inc. trying to pass off responsibility in a suit by the city of Jacksonville over cleanup costs from a former gas plant.

Expert Analysis

  • Classification Confusion For Transportation Cos. At 9th Circ.

    Bradford Hughes

    Following the Ninth Circuit's recent decision in California Trucking Association v. Su, transportation companies across California are left wondering what standard will be applied to determine whether an independent contractor is an employee, says Bradford Hughes of Clark Hill PLC.

  • Opinion

    Time To Jump-Start Stalled Autonomous Vehicle Regulation

    Tod Northman

    While consumer advocate Ralph Nader is right to express concern over proposed driverless car legislation, his premise that lawmaking is moving too fast is wrong. The real problem is that lawmaking is not moving at all, say Tod Northman and Chris Pantoja of Tucker Ellis LLP.

  • Musk Case Signals New Era Of SEC Internet Enforcement

    John Reed Stark

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's complaint last week against Elon Musk and the settlement that followed seems like an obvious, routine and easy win for the government. But there is a lot more to the Tesla tweet debacle than meets the eye, says John Reed Stark of John Reed Stark Consulting LLC.

  • 3 Key Employment Law Issues To Keep An Eye On

    Lovita Tandy

    Employment lawyers dare not turn away from their news feeds lest they miss the next critical case law update. Lovita Tandy of Tandy Legal and Bonnie Burke of Lawrence & Bundy LLC review the latest on sexual orientation discrimination, employee arbitration agreements and joint employer liability.

  • How Corporate Reputation Risk Is Exacerbating D&O Liability

    Nir Kossovsky

    At a time when the materiality of corporate reputation risk is widely recognized, but institutional safeguards against that risk are not, what are the implications for directors and officers? The current state of play is not comforting, says Nir Kossovsky of Steel City Re.

  • Product Liability For Online Marketplaces And Car-Sharing

    Steven Kramer

    Just as Amazon and other online retail intermediaries have raised new product liability questions, similar questions are being asked about companies that provide short-term vehicle rentals. The legal theories that insulate online marketplaces from strict product liability concerns can also be applied to car-sharing businesses, says Steven Kramer of Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott LLC.

  • 5 More GC Tips For Succeeding As A New Associate

    Jason Idilbi

    Jason Idilbi, former BigLaw associate and general counsel of the tech startup Passport Labs Inc., returns to Law360 to share recent thoughts on best practices for newer associates — whether they are serving external clients or senior attorneys within their firms.

  • Illinois Tax Talk: Motor Fuel Taxes

    Christopher Lutz

    Illinois businesses engaging in activities relating to fuel in any way, even those which do not believe themselves to be retailers or distributors, should be apprised of potential multijurisdictional obligations regarding the various Illinois motor fuel taxes, says Christopher Lutz of Horwood Marcus & Berk Chtd.

  • Open-Source Software In Connected Vehicles: Pros And Cons

    Marjorie Loeb

    As automobiles become part of the internet of things, some automakers and their suppliers are turning to open-source software to reduce costs, accelerate development and enhance interoperability. But a disciplined and thoughtful approach is needed to evaluate software licensing terms, functionality, stability and security, say attorneys with Mayer Brown LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Block Reviews 'Tough Cases'

    Judge Frederic Block

    In a new, extraordinary book, "Tough Cases: Judges Tell the Stories of Some of the Hardest Decisions They’ve Ever Made," 13 of my judicial brethren have courageously and dramatically humanized the judicial process, says U.S. District Judge Frederic Block of the Eastern District of New York.