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Transportation

  • October 17, 2018

    Truckers Tell High Court State Taxes Threaten Deregulation

    Trucking carriers in Washington state have said the U.S. Supreme Court needs to hear a trio of cases to preserve federal trucking deregulation or states will continue to pass employment laws undermining the carriers.

  • October 17, 2018

    Full 9th Circ. Won’t Refuel Airfare Price-Fixing Suit

    The full Ninth Circuit has refused to take another stab at an antitrust suit that accuses three major airlines and an airfare publisher of plotting to fix prices for travel among multiple cities.

  • October 17, 2018

    EPA's Science Review, Truck Emissions Rules On Back Burner

    The Trump administration has indicated it will delay the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's controversial proposal to avoid rulemaking based on research that isn't publicly available and indefinitely shelve the EPA's repeal of Obama-era emissions standards for heavy-duty trucks outfitted with engines from older trucks.

  • October 17, 2018

    Hertz Says Consumer's Robocalls Suit Too Narrow For Class

    The Hertz Corp. has asked an Illinois federal judge to dismiss a consumer's proposed class action alleging invasion of privacy based on robocalls the company made to him when his mother kept a car weeks past due, saying the circumstances are too specific to represent a group.

  • October 17, 2018

    American Airlines Sues Expedia Over 'Advantage' Trademarks

    American Airlines hit Expedia with a trademark lawsuit in Texas federal court Tuesday over the booking site’s launch of an “Add On Advantage” program, saying the name is confusingly similar to the airline’s “AAdvantage” rewards brand.

  • October 16, 2018

    Duck Boat Cos.' Inaction Caused Deadly Crash, Jury Told

    Counsel for 42 victims of a “duck boat” crash that killed five people told a Seattle jury during opening statements Tuesday that the crash happened because of an axle defect that was improperly handled by amphibious vehicle tour company Ride the Ducks International and its Seattle licensee, while the companies blamed each other for not making a recommended repair to the vehicle. 

  • October 16, 2018

    United Pilots Win Cert. Over Military Benefits Denial

    An Illinois federal judge on Tuesday granted certification to pilots accusing United Airlines and Continental Airlines of denying sick and vacation time, as well as full pension payments, to employees on military leave, saying that after the airlines merged, some pilots were allegedly treated differently and that could be enough to prove a violation of the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act. 

  • October 16, 2018

    FCC Commissioners Support Plan To Reopen 5.9 GHz Rules

    FCC Commissioners Jessica Rosenworcel and Michael O’Rielly offered bipartisan support Tuesday for a trade association’s plan that would rethink the allocation of the 5.9 GHz spectrum band for automotive safety features and use it to power Wi-Fi and unlicensed devices.

  • October 16, 2018

    Uber Gets Car Crash Negligence Suit Sent To NY

    An Illinois federal judge has transferred to the Southern District of New York a negligence suit filed by a Chicago man who was paralyzed when his Uber ride crashed, saying most of the case's "material events" happened in the Big Apple.

  • October 16, 2018

    Deals Rumor Mill: Uber, Lyft, Tribune

    Proposals have valued Uber at a whopping $120 billion in its initial public offering, Lyft tapped JPMorgan Chase & Co., Credit Suisse and Jefferies as underwriters on its IPO, and Hicks Equity Partners is eyeing Tribune Media and its nearly four dozen TV stations.

  • October 16, 2018

    Mitsuba To Pay $4.6M To Bow Out Of Car Parts MDL

    Mitsuba Corp. has agreed to shell out $4.6 million and cooperate with its accusers to escape claims in sprawling multidistrict litigation alleging it was part of a conspiracy to fix prices on two types of auto parts, direct buyers told a Michigan federal judge in a pair of proposed settlements on Monday.

  • October 16, 2018

    Duck Boat Owner Says Law Limits Liability Over Fatal Sinking

    The owner of an amphibious “duck boat” has filed an action in Missouri federal court seeking to limit its liability over the deadly July sinking that claimed the lives of 17 tourists by citing a federal maritime law enacted in the 19th century.

  • October 16, 2018

    Uber Reaches $1.3M Deal In Drivers' Collective FLSA Action

    Uber Technologies Inc. will pay $1.3 million to settle Fair Labor Standards Act claims from more than 5,000 drivers who aren’t bound by arbitration agreements and alleged the ride-hailing giant misclassified them as independent contractors instead of employees, according to a North Carolina federal court filing Tuesday.

  • October 16, 2018

    Washington Pays $28M To Head Off Crash Survivor's Trial

    The state of Washington will pay $28 million to settle claims that its failure to bring a highway pillar up to legal standard was responsible for crash injuries that made a 15-year-old girl a quadriplegic.

  • October 16, 2018

    Philly UberBlack Drivers Press 3rd Circ. For Employee Status

    Philadelphia-based Uber limo drivers told the Third Circuit on Monday that they're similar to migrant workers who are compensated at the whim of an economically dominant entity, meaning they should be recognized as employees entitled to proper wages under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

  • October 16, 2018

    The Path To Becoming A Supreme Court Advocate

    A look at the careers of attorneys who have dominated oral advocacy at the U.S. Supreme Court over the last decade shows a similar path for men and women, with a few key differences. Here’s how the top 10 male and female advocates stack up.

  • October 16, 2018

    $20M SEC Settlements For Musk, Tesla Approved By Judge

    A New York federal judge on Tuesday signed off on a pair of settlements that will see Tesla Inc. and its embattled CEO Elon Musk pay the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission $20 million apiece to end claims that Musk misled investors in tweets about taking the Silicon Valley-based electric car maker private.

  • October 16, 2018

    VW Can't Duck Court Rules In Robocall Suit, Class Says

    A certified class of Volkswagen owners suing over robocalls has urged a California federal court not to bend its rule restricting parties to only one summary judgment motion, saying the German automaker already wasted its only chance.

  • October 16, 2018

    Audi Fined $925M In Germany Over Diesel Emissions

    German authorities on Tuesday hit Volkswagen’s luxury division, Audi AG, with a $925 million fine for selling cars rigged to pass emissions tests despite their emissions being higher than allowable standards.

  • October 16, 2018

    Energy Policy Goes To The Polls In Western US States

    A carbon tax in Washington and renewable energy mandates in Arizona and Nevada are part of a "green wall" of ballot initiatives in western U.S. states that could have significant impacts on the energy sector, experts say. Here, Law360 highlights major energy-related state referendums headed to the polls in November.

Expert Analysis

  • Open-Source Software In Connected Vehicles: Pros And Cons

    Marjorie Loeb

    As automobiles become part of the internet of things, some automakers and their suppliers are turning to open-source software to reduce costs, accelerate development and enhance interoperability. But a disciplined and thoughtful approach is needed to evaluate software licensing terms, functionality, stability and security, say attorneys with Mayer Brown LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Block Reviews 'Tough Cases'

    Judge Frederic Block

    In a new, extraordinary book, "Tough Cases: Judges Tell the Stories of Some of the Hardest Decisions They’ve Ever Made," 13 of my judicial brethren have courageously and dramatically humanized the judicial process, says U.S. District Judge Frederic Block of the Eastern District of New York.

  • Sharing Economy Brings New Opportunities For Insurers

    DL9040_Fernandez_Alexandra_1500x1500.jpg

    The ever-expanding sharing economy operates within the framework of an insurance industry that is constantly adapting to new technologies and risks. Collaboration between traditional carriers and innovators will lead to more participants for platforms and more customers for carriers, says Alexandra Fernandez of Zelle LLP.

  • Election Interference Sanctions Expand Compliance Risks

    Nicole Erb

    President Donald Trump issued an executive order this month authorizing new sanctions against parties determined to have interfered in U.S. elections. In the event more sanctions are imposed, the number of sanctions targets could increase significantly, placing additional importance on screening of transaction parties and their ownership structures, say attorneys at White & Case LLP.

  • 8 Innovative Ways To Empower Jurors

    Christopher Campbell

    Much time and attention have been focused on improving lawyers' abilities to communicate with and persuade juries in complex trials. But it is equally important to equip and prepare jurors to become better students in the courtroom, say attorneys with DLA Piper and Litstrat Inc.

  • Cloud Computing Clearly The Future For Small Firms

    Holly Urban

    While in-house technology investments on the scale and complexity needed to compete with large firms remain cost prohibitive for small and midsize law firms, cloud-based services offer significant cost savings and productivity gains with little to no capital investment, says Holly Urban of Effortless Legal LLC.

  • Leveraging Today's Lateral Associate Market

    Darin Morgan

    With the Milbank/Cravath pay scale once again equalizing compensation at many Am Law 100 firms, there is even more pressure for firms to differentiate themselves to top lateral associate candidates. This presents strategic considerations for both law firms and lateral candidates throughout the recruitment process, says Darin Morgan of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: Stanford's Jeff Fisher Talks Supreme Court

    Jeffrey Fisher

    In this series featuring law school luminaries, Stanford Law School professor Jeffrey Fisher discusses his motivation for teaching, arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court and what the court might look like if Judge Brett Kavanaugh is confirmed.

  • Clearing Up Some Pipeline Permit Questions At 3rd Circ.

    Deidre Duncan

    Two recent decisions from the Third Circuit — Delaware Riverkeeper and Township of Bordentown — indicate that resolving questions related to state appeals of pipeline project permits will ultimately turn on the particulars of the state administrative process, say Deidre Duncan and Clare Ellis of Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP.

  • Muddy Road Ahead For Autonomous Vehicle Liability In EU

    Anna Masser

    The product liability regimes related to driverless cars in various European countries remain far from harmonized, and lawmakers trail behind the fast-moving reality. As the European Commission works to update the European Product Liability Directive, evolving legal definitions of "producer," "product" and "defect" will be vital for the industry, say attorneys with Jones Day.