Transportation

  • January 06, 2021

    Ga. Judge 'Torn' Over GM Exec Deposition In Car Defect Suit

    A Georgia Court of Appeals judge said Wednesday he was "torn" over whether the CEO of General Motors should be deposed in a product liability suit brought by the husband of a woman who died after a crash allegedly caused by a defective vehicle control system.

  • January 06, 2021

    Coke Taps Ex-Boeing Adviser As Point Person In Tax Case

    The Coca-Cola Co. on Wednesday said it appointed a former U.S. federal judge and Boeing executive to step into a newly created role of counselor and special adviser to the company's leadership, as the Atlanta-based beverage giant faces ongoing litigation with the Internal Revenue Service.

  • January 05, 2021

    Calif. High Court Asked To Clarify Call-Recording Rules

    A consumer urged the California Supreme Court on Tuesday to find that the state penal code prohibits both third-party eavesdroppers and call participants from recording without all participants' consent, arguing that finding otherwise would "gut" state privacy statutes and the "express intent of the legislature."

  • January 05, 2021

    FAA's New Drone Rules Only A 'Starting Point' For Businesses

    Recently finalized rules allowing drones to fly over people and at night may pave the way for increased commercial use of the technology, but such operations still face barriers stemming from property rights concerns, privacy rules and jurisdictional uncertainty.

  • January 05, 2021

    Evenflo Gets Car Seat Infringement Claims Trimmed

    A Delaware federal judge on Tuesday cut out some of the infringement claims Evenflo Co. Inc. is facing in a child car seat patent suit brought by a manufacturer for rival baby products company Graco.

  • January 05, 2021

    Arbitration Institution Backs High Court Discovery Petition

    The International Institute for Conflict Prevention & Resolution is backing a bid for the U.S. Supreme Court to resolve whether U.S. law allows federal courts to order discovery for private commercial arbitration abroad, arguing Tuesday that uncertainty on this "highly important issue" will prevail without its help.

  • January 05, 2021

    Pilots' Union Beats 7-Year Lawsuit Over Back Pay Dispersal

    The Air Line Pilots Association defeated a seven-year old suit in Illinois federal court on Tuesday brought by United Airlines pilot instructors alleging that the union improperly disbursed back pay after United and Continental Airlines' merger in 2010.

  • January 05, 2021

    Ind. Lawmakers Propose Coronavirus Liability Shield Bill

    Indiana lawmakers kicked off a new legislative session Monday by introducing a bill that would provide a broad civil liability shield for businesses, premises owners and others in relation to COVID-19 exposure suits.

  • January 05, 2021

    Ex-WilmerHale Temp Says Agency 'Cooked' Case Jurisdiction

    A Manhattan federal judge on Tuesday deemed "serious" a former WilmerHale temp's claims that legal staffing agency Hire Counsel had knowingly misled the court in order to "cook up" federal jurisdiction for its lawsuit against him.

  • January 05, 2021

    COBRA Suit Against Southwest Grounded For Good

    A former Southwest Airlines worker has settled her suit against the airline claiming it violated COBRA by failing to properly notify her of her right to stay on the company's health insurance plan after she was fired.

  • January 05, 2021

    Extraction Oil Approved For Ch. 11 Midstream Settlements

    Bankrupt energy driller Extraction Oil & Gas received approval Tuesday from a Delaware bankruptcy judge for a pair of settlements with midstream contract partners that improve the terms of prepetition contracts and allow for those deals to be assumed in the Chapter 11 case.

  • January 05, 2021

    Coronavirus Regulations: A State-By-State Week In Review

    Despite difficulties surrounding the coronavirus vaccine rollout in some areas, including a Wisconsin pharmacist accused of intentionally spoiling 500 doses, the new year ushered in the first round of inoculations for Illinois veterans in long-term care facilities as well as plans to administer the vaccine to first responders in Massachusetts. 

  • January 05, 2021

    Split NLRB OKs Ambulance Co.'s Social Media Limits

    A California ambulance company did not infringe on its workers' rights by implementing policies preventing them from disparaging the company or making certain other comments on social media, a divided National Labor Relations Board panel has ruled, reversing a decision from an agency judge.

  • January 05, 2021

    Garrett Motion Equity Group Seeks $2.5M In Investor Fees

    The official committee of equity security holders in the Chapter 11 case of auto parts maker Garrett Motion Inc. has asked a New York judge to have the debtor pay up to $2.5 million in fees and expenses for a pair of investors pursuing a potential equity financing transaction.

  • January 05, 2021

    4th Circ. Won't Restart Ex-UPS Driver's Religious Bias Suit

    The Fourth Circuit on Tuesday backed UPS' win in a suit from a former driver who claimed the delivery giant punished her for refusing to work on the Sabbath by overloading her truck, saying her case was based entirely on "conjecture."

  • January 05, 2021

    Fired Employee Gets 2nd Shot At Arbitration For Sex Bias Suit

    A California appeals court reversed a trial judge's decision refusing to send a sex bias and wage suit to arbitration, saying the lower court's analysis of a fired employee's arbitration pact with the cargo company didn't dig deep enough.

  • January 05, 2021

    Shipowners Seek $37M After Indonesian Navy Detains Crew

    The owners of a merchant ship seized by the Indonesian Navy are chasing six insurers at the High Court in London for $37 million allegedly owed to them under a policy covering marine risks. 

  • January 04, 2021

    American Axle Pleads With Justices For Eligibility Clarity

    American Axle has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a bitterly divided Federal Circuit decision invalidating its car driveshaft patent for claiming only a natural law, saying "the entire patent system is desperate" for more clarity from the justices on patent eligibility.

  • January 04, 2021

    NJ Justices Unsure Insurers Can Dodge $400M Sandy Bill

    The New Jersey Supreme Court on Monday challenged a group of insurers' stance that they were only obliged to provide New Jersey Transit Corp. up to $100 million to cover flood damage caused by Superstorm Sandy, questioning the purpose of a separate "named windstorm" definition in policies affording $400 million in coverage.

  • January 04, 2021

    Energy Giants Want High Court View On More Climate Rulings

    Dozens of energy giants have petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court to review First Circuit and Ninth Circuit decisions that allowed climate change suits to play out in state court, just weeks before the justices are set to hear oral arguments in a related case from the Fourth Circuit.

  • January 04, 2021

    Nissan Exec Freed From Investors' Pay Scandal Suit

    A Tennessee federal judge dismissed one Nissan executive from a putative securities fraud class action, but kept others who have been trying to get out of a suit that seeks to hold the automaker and its fugitive ex-chairman liable for investors' alleged losses.

  • January 04, 2021

    DLA Piper-Led Sylebra To Invest $200M In Car Sensor Tie-Up

    Investment group Sylebra Capital, guided by DLA Piper, will contribute $200 million as part of a more than $2 billion tie-up between blank-check company InterPrivate Acquisition and autonomous car sensor maker Aeva, according to a statement Monday.

  • January 04, 2021

    EPA Finalizes Aircraft GHG Emissions Standards

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has finalized the nation's first-ever greenhouse gas emissions standards for aircraft, bringing U.S. regulations in line with rules set by a United Nations aviation regulatory body.

  • January 04, 2021

    Etihad Airways Accused Of Unlawfully Favoring UAE Nationals

    The United Arab Emirates' national airline is facing a federal discrimination suit by an American senior operations manager who claims the airline has an unlawful policy of favoring UAE nationals over non-Emiratis in its employment decisions and that it retaliated when she raised concerns.

  • January 04, 2021

    Enterprise Can't Shake WARN Act Liability Over Virus Layoffs

    A Florida federal judge has cleared a WARN Act case over Enterprise's coronavirus layoffs to move ahead, finding Monday that the federal statute's carveouts for employers facing extreme, unexpected situations don't completely neutralize protections for workers laid off during the pandemic.

Expert Analysis

  • Carbon Capture Policy Should Be Aligned For Global Adoption

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    With support from both Republicans and Democrats, carbon capture, utilization and storage technology as a tool for decarbonization may be poised for domestic growth — but the U.S. and the European Union must coordinate their policies to promote a global approach, say Hunter Johnston and Jeff Weiss at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • A Key To Helping Clients Make Better Decisions During Crisis

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    As the pandemic brings a variety of legal stresses for businesses, lawyers must understand the emotional dynamic of a crisis and the particular energy it produces to effectively fulfill their role as advisers, say Meredith Parfet and Aaron Solomon at Ravenyard Group.

  • Expect Major Changes In Aerospace And Defense Under Biden

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    President-elect Joe Biden is expected to significantly shift aerospace and defense industry priorities, revoke certain Trump administration government contractor policies, strengthen "Buy American" requirements, and increase use of defense and NASA budgetary authority to combat climate change, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • How Federal, State Plans Could Bring Carbon Capture To US

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    Proposals from President-elect Joe Biden, a pair of bills currently pending in Congress and a low-carbon fuels program in California provide insights into how carbon capture, utilization and storage technology could be integrated into the fight against climate change in the U.S., say Hunter Johnston and Jeff Weiss at Steptoe.

  • What To Expect From DOJ Enforcement Under Biden

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    Companies shouldn't fear a rapid uptick in overall corporate enforcement actions by the U.S. Department of Justice under a new Democratic administration, but should anticipate a shift in focus away from immigration cases toward COVID-19-related fraud and civil rights reform, say Sandra Moser and Kenneth Polite at Morgan Lewis.

  • Ethics Considerations For Law Firms Implementing AI

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    Richard Finkelman and Yihua Astle at Berkeley Research Group discuss the ethical and bias concerns law firms must address when implementing artificial intelligence-powered applications for recruiting, conflict identification and client counseling.

  • EU Climate Goals Are Hard To Reach Without Carbon Capture

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    The European Union's failure to fully embrace blue fuels, produced using carbon capture, utilization and storage technologies, may hinder the region's pursuit of its aggressive decarbonization goals, say Hunter Johnston and Jeff Weiss at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • Picking The Right Location And Tools For Virtual Courtrooms

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    Attorneys should consider the pros and cons of participating in virtual court proceedings from home versus their law firm offices, and whether they have the right audio, video and team communication tools for their particular setup, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Carbon Capture Tech Offers A Fast Path Toward Climate Goals

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    To meet ambitious climate goals, the U.S., EU and other developed nations must immediately start reducing carbon emissions from fossil fuels, which policymakers can encourage by supporting carbon capture, utilization and storage technologies, say Hunter Johnston and Jeff Weiss at Steptoe.

  • Beware Atty Ethics Rules When Reporting COVID-19 Fraud

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    Attorneys considering blowing the whistle on False Claims Act violations by recipients of COVID-19 relief may face a number of ethical constraints on their ability to disclose client information and file qui tam actions, say Breon Peace and Jennifer Kennedy Park at Cleary.

  • Looking For Judicial Activists? Check The Footnotes

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    U.S. Supreme Court nominees typically face intense questioning over potential judicial activism, but a better way to gauge judges' activist tendencies may be to look at the footnotes in their opinions, say Christopher Collier at Hawkins Parnell and Michael Arndt at Rohan Law.

  • Using Prior Art In Patentability Args Amid Fed. Circ. Confusion

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    While waiting for the Federal Circuit to resolve its recent inconsistent treatment of prior-art-based arguments during a Section 101 patent eligibility analysis, practitioners should draft patent specifications to show improvements over prior art and then leverage them in litigation, say Michael Kiklis and Matthew Zapadka at Bass Berry.

  • Best Practices For Legal Technology Adoption

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    The pandemic has accelerated the need to improve the practice of law through technology, but law firms and in-house legal departments must first ensure they have employee buy-in and well-defined processes for new digital tools, say Dan Broderick at BlackBoiler and Daryl Shetterly at Orrick.

  • Valuation Uncertainty Could Prompt Increased Litigation

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    The COVID-19 pandemic has increased volatility around forward-looking cash flows and discount rates, which may lead to more business valuation disputes, particularly in the M&A and bankruptcy litigation contexts, say analysts at Cornerstone Research.

  • Opinion

    Dakota Pipeline Challenge Undermines Permitting Process

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    If Standing Rock Sioux Tribe v. Army Corps of Engineers succeeds at challenging the Dakota Access Pipeline's environmental permitting more than three years after it came online, other infrastructure projects might also face legal battles long after they are built, says David Hill at the Columbia University Center on Global Energy Policy.

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