Transportation

  • January 11, 2021

    NLRB OKs $200K Deal In Case Against Puerto Rican Auto Co.

    A Puerto Rican auto parts company has agreed to pay more than $200,000 in back pay and rehire laid off union workers to resolve a complaint alleging it violated federal labor law, according to a National Labor Relations Board decision approving a settlement agreement. 

  • January 11, 2021

    Garrett Motion, Honeywell Agree To $1.2B Ch. 11 Deal

    Bankrupt car part maker Garrett Motion Inc. canceled its plans to pursue a sale of its assets Monday, telling a New York judge it is pivoting to a reorganization plan supported by existing investors and relying on a settlement with former parent Honeywell Inc. to resolve $1.2 billion in lingering asbestos liability.

  • January 11, 2021

    'This Is Nuts!' Mass. AG's Approach To Repair Suit Irks Judge

    A federal judge on Monday derided as "nuts" the Massachusetts attorney general's stance on efforts to shield proprietary information as part of an auto industry suit challenging a recent amendment to the state's Right to Repair law.

  • January 11, 2021

    Justices Decline To Hear Canadian Pacific's Rail Deal Row

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear Canadian Pacific Railway's argument the Seventh Circuit wrongly held its state-law corporate wrongdoing claims against two rival rail companies were preempted by a federal railroad oversight law.

  • January 11, 2021

    Union Sues CSX Over Shift To Electronic Payroll System

    CSX Transportation Inc. violated federal labor law by unilaterally implementing an error-prone electronic payroll system and requiring railroad workers to report to their shifts early and stay late to clock in and out, a union alleged in a lawsuit filed in Kentucky federal court.

  • January 11, 2021

    GIP Bests Competitors With $4.6B Bid For Signature Aviation

    Global Infrastructure Partners, guided by Linklaters, has agreed to buy Slaughter and May-advised Signature Aviation for nearly $4.63 billion in a transaction meant to usurp an offer Blackstone Group made for the U.K. aviation service provider last week, the companies said Monday. 

  • January 11, 2021

    Domino's Franchisees Seek Arbitration In Driver's FLSA Suit

    A former Domino's Pizza Inc. delivery driver should have to arbitrate his claims that Oklahoma and Texas franchisees broke federal and state labor laws by not reimbursing him for all expenses, the franchisees said in a filing in Oklahoma federal court.

  • January 11, 2021

    Justices Won't Touch Muslim Flight Attendant's Bias Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court refused Monday to hear a suit brought by an ExpressJet flight attendant who said she was fired because her Muslim faith prohibited her from serving alcohol, despite her argument that there's confusion about whether civil rights cases like hers belong in federal court.

  • January 11, 2021

    Justices Won't Hear Wisconsin Drivers' OT Exemption Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a bid by Wisconsin truck drivers to revive their Fair Labor Standards Act class claims in a case examining whether short-haul drivers were part of the chain of interstate commerce and exempt from overtime pay.

  • January 11, 2021

    British Finance Regulator OKs World's First Airfare Index

    The Financial Conduct Authority has approved the world's first air-travel price index to help airlines hedge swings in ticket fares as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to inflict chaos on the travel industry.

  • January 10, 2021

    Top 5 Criminal Justice Reforms Advocates Want Under Biden

    Joe Biden's election as president has sparked hope among criminal justice advocates and organizations that his administration will overhaul the U.S. criminal justice system and implement reforms they have been seeking for years.

  • January 08, 2021

    Tribes Press For Shutdown Of Dakota Access Pipeline

    Four Native American tribes doubled down on their request for a D.C. federal court to shut down the Dakota Access pipeline during a court-ordered environmental review, telling the court their interests are harmed every day the pipeline is allowed to operate without the proper approvals.

  • January 08, 2021

    High Court Takes Up 10th Circ.'s Biofuel Exemptions Ruling

    The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Friday to review the Tenth Circuit's decision to rescind the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's exemptions that temporarily relieved small refineries from having to blend renewable fuels into their products.

  • January 08, 2021

    5 Things To Expect From A Biden Department Of Interior

    Moves to increase renewable energy development on public lands and waters at the expense of fossil fuels will highlight the energy policy U-turn the U.S. Department of the Interior is expected to make when President-elect Joe Biden takes office this month. Here are five policy steps agency watchers are preparing for.

  • January 08, 2021

    FCA Says To Hit Brakes On Suit Over Defective Dodge Hood

    FCA US LLC asked a California federal court on Friday to throw out a proposed class action alleging it sells vehicles with defective hood scoops, saying the lead plaintiff is not entitled to the full price of his car for cosmetic damage that the carmaker had already offered to fix for free.

  • January 08, 2021

    Fla. Sen. Files Bill To Block Key West Cruise Ban

    A new bill in the Florida Senate would block three amendments to the Key West city charter that voters approved in November to ban large cruise ships from docking at the Florida island because of health and environmental concerns.

  • January 08, 2021

    L3Harris, Aviation Co. Agree To End Bid-Rigging Feud

    A small, minority-owned airport operations management company has agreed to dismiss its anti-competition claims leveled against L3Harris Technologies Inc., the parties told a Virginia federal judge on Friday.

  • January 08, 2021

    Judge OKs Cruise Ship Workers' Deal Over Severance Pay

    A Florida federal judge has signed off on a settlement that will provide up to two months' severance pay for former employees of a Bahamas cruise ship operator who were terminated when the cruise industry shut down because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • January 08, 2021

    Maritime Disputes Expert Docks At Watson Farley In London

    A maritime disputes expert has joined Watson Farley & Williams as the firm's newest partner in London after a 15-year run at Stephenson Harwood, where he previously led the marine and international trade practice.

  • January 08, 2021

    DOD Official Says Anti-Drone Plan Will Improve Tech Adoption

    The U.S. Department of Defense's new anti-small drone strategy will help speed up bringing new technology on board and eliminate redundant development efforts that have seen the department ineffectively spend billions of dollars, its counter-drone chief said Friday.

  • January 08, 2021

    Wells Fargo Accused Of Bias Against Non-Citizen Customers

    Two Russian nationals seeking asylum in California filed a proposed class action on Thursday accusing Wells Fargo of improperly refusing service to non-citizen residents not covered by the bank's recent settlement of similar claims from Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals recipients.

  • January 08, 2021

    NHTSA Finds No Proof Of Tesla Acceleration Defect

    The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration on Friday said it was shutting down its review of claims that about a half-million Tesla Inc. vehicles are affected by a defect that causes sudden unintended acceleration, saying it found no evidence of a defect.

  • January 08, 2021

    Mass. Top Court Skeptical CDA Shields Car-Sharing Co. Turo

    Massachusetts' highest court said Friday that car-sharing company Turo Inc. may be doing more than simply providing an online platform for person-to-person car exchanges and therefore might not be shielded by the Communications Decency Act from an order barring transactions at Boston's Logan International Airport.

  • January 08, 2021

    Boeing's Favorable Crash Deal Leaves Victims' Families Livid

    Chalk up a win for the Boeing Co.'s chief legal officer, Brett Perry. Boeing's legal and compliance departments appear to have escaped mostly unscathed in the company's $2.5 billion deferred prosecution agreement.   

  • January 08, 2021

    9th Circ. Affirms Dismissal Of $73M ERISA Suit

    The Ninth Circuit has refused to revive a union member's proposed class action against his pension fund over its alleged failure to prevent a $73 million loss, saying he was asking for relief the court could not grant.

Expert Analysis

  • Rulings Show Limits Of Federal Agency Vacancy Law

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    Recent court decisions applying the Federal Vacancies Reform Act to invalidate improper presidential appointments of acting federal agency heads have had little evident impact, highlighting shortcomings in the law that could become more acute if the presidency and Senate are controlled by different parties, says Steven Gordon at Holland & Knight.

  • Justices' Ford Comments Hint At Specific Jurisdiction Rule

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    Recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court in Ford Motor Co. v. Montana Eighth Judicial District Court suggests the court may be leaning toward limiting specific jurisdiction over nonresident defendants to forums where a defendant actually aimed or conducted activities that allegedly caused a plaintiff's injury, says Christine Shang at Locke Lord.

  • Navigating Inability-To-Pay Claims With DOJ Amid COVID-19

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    It's likely to get harder to argue that a company is unable to pay penalties resulting from a U.S. Department of Justice prosecution during the pandemic, but using contemporaneous documentation can help ensure continued viability, say Shari Schindler at StoneTurn, and Ryan Rohlfsen and Jordan Harvey at Ropes & Gray.

  • Opinion

    BigLaw Must Drop The Billable Hour To Improve Diversity

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    Implementing pay structures that compensate attorneys for achieving clients' goals rather than measuring success based on hours billed is a necessary first step to keeping underrepresented attorneys in BigLaw, says Elizabeth Korchin at Therium Capital.

  • The Post-Election State AG Enforcement Landscape

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    Election results so far have kept the number of Republican and Democratic state attorneys general even, and no matter the outcome of the presidential race, AGs will work across the aisle on important issues like health care, competition and the environment, says former Illinois attorney general Lisa Madigan at Kirkland.

  • Aviation Insurers Must Prep For Vaccine Shipment Risks

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    As aviation and logistics companies plan for safe and efficient distribution of a COVID-19 vaccine, insurers must prepare for the unique risks that may come with this massive operation, say James Jordan and Paul Woodley at Holman Fenwick.

  • Minn. Litigants May Soon Have Clarity On Jurisdiction

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    The recent ruling in Backe v. A.W. Keuttel & Sons typifies Minnesota courts' broad view of specific personal jurisdiction over out-of-state companies — but the U.S. Supreme Court's upcoming decision in Ford Motor Co. v. Montana Eighth Judicial District Court may clarify what connection a company must have to a state to be sued there, says Danielle Luisi at Husch Blackwell.

  • A Study Of Virtual Reality's Courtroom Applications

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    Virtual reality technology can transport jurors to a scene without their leaving the courtroom, but expert witnesses and counsel must carefully weigh 3D technology's limitations compared to conventional media and the richness of human perception, say consultants at Exponent.

  • 8 Tips For Effective Oral Advocacy In Virtual Court Hearings

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    Jim Lofton at Lofton Legally Speaking explains why tightly constructed arguments, the right camera angle and good online behavior are crucial to a powerful virtual courtroom presentation.

  • Where Renewable Energy Is Headed After Election Day

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    In the past four years, the renewable energy industry has seen considerable growth, despite new obstacles put in place by the Trump administration — and no matter who wins this presidential election, the industry can make a strong case for its ability to create jobs, boost environmental equality and help solve the climate crisis, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • A GC's Blueprint For Improving Legal Industry Diversity

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    General counsel are in a unique position to ensure that their partner law firms are giving significant case assignments to underrepresented attorneys, and to help future generations of lawyers access meaningful opportunities early in their education or careers, says Laura Schumacher, chief legal officer at AbbVie.

  • Perspectives

    Book Review: Did The High Court Cause Mass Incarceration?

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    William Pizzi's argument in "The Supreme Court's Role in Mass Incarceration" that the U.S. Supreme Court is responsible for the high rate of incarceration is compelling, but his criticism overlooks the positive dimensions of the criminal procedure decisions under Chief Justice Earl Warren, says U.S. District Judge Lynn Adelman of the Eastern District of Wisconsin.

  • Key Carbon Market Developments From 2020: Part 2

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    While the upcoming election will have a major impact on the development of carbon market mechanisms in the U.S., growth in emissions trading and stronger regulation is expected in Europe and China, and across the global aviation industry, say Brook Detterman and Allyn Stern at Beveridge & Diamond and independent consultant Stacey Halliday.

  • Persuasion Skills Attys Can Learn From Political Speeches

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    The tools of powerful political speeches — those with soaring rhetoric that convinces and moves listeners — can be equally applicable to oral advocacy, case strategy and brief writing, say Lauren Papenhausen and Julian Canzoneri at White & Case and former presidential speech writer Dave Cavell.

  • Veil-Piercing Defense Lessons From Kumho Tire Case

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    A recent ruling by a South Dakota federal court in Jahner v. Kumho Tire USA sheds light on how plaintiffs may assert veil-piercing or alter ego allegations to gain personal jurisdiction over a foreign corporate parent — and how to defend against such claims, say attorneys at Dechert.

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