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Trials

  • August 17, 2018

    Manafort Judge Talks Threats In Not Releasing Jurors' Names

    The Virginia federal judge overseeing the Paul Manafort trial on Friday revealed he has received threats during the case and expressed concern that revealing the names of jurors deliberating the fate of the former Trump campaign chair could put their “peace and safety” at risk.

  • August 17, 2018

    Bowles Rice, Insurer Resolve $41M Fight On Eve Of Trial

    Bowles Rice has resolved a $41 million fight with a title insurer stemming from a troubled coal plant build and averted a trial that was set to start Monday, according to a lawyer involved in the case, heading off what at least one expert said was a sizable threat to the firm in the face of its limited malpractice coverage.

  • August 17, 2018

    Toyota At Fault In $242M Verdict Over Kids' Crash Injuries

    A Dallas jury on Friday found that defective front seats in a Lexus caused two children’s severe injuries during a rear-end collision and awarded the youngsters and their parents roughly $242 million in damages, holding Toyota bore the vast majority of the blame for their injuries.

  • August 17, 2018

    Feds Can't Recoup From $33M Award If Child Dies: 11th Circ.

    The Eleventh Circuit on Friday largely affirmed a trial judge’s post-verdict decisions in a suit accusing a federally funded health clinic doctor of causing a newborn’s brain damage, saying the federal government can’t recover portions of a $33 million verdict if the child dies earlier than expected.

  • August 17, 2018

    Cooley Adds Ex-Boies Schiller Trial Partner In NY

    Cooley LLP said Thursday that it has hired a former Boies Schiller Flexner LLP trial partner with experience representing financial institutions and sports and entertainment clients in securities and antitrust litigation, as well as in international and domestic arbitrations, bolstering its offerings in New York.

  • August 17, 2018

    Jury Clears Airport-Adjacent Co. In Fatal Jet Crash Case

    An Atlanta jury on Friday evening cleared industrial manufacturer Milliken & Company of any liability for a business jet crash that killed five people, rejecting claims by the children of one of the victims that Milliken should pay $20 million because it improperly allowed construction of a power pole the plane hit.

  • August 17, 2018

    Book Reseller Can't Dodge $34M Infringement Verdict

    A New York federal judge on Friday rejected attempts by used bookseller Book Dog Books LLC to dodge a $34.2 million jury verdict for copyright and trademark infringement, upholding the verdict awarded to McGraw-Hill, Cengage and other publishers over Book Dog's sale of counterfeit textbooks.

  • August 17, 2018

    Dutch National Gets 17 Years For $2.5M Investment Schemes

    An Illinois federal judge on Thursday sentenced a Dutch national to 17 years in prison in an international criminal fraud case that saw the man cop to procuring more than $2.5 million through fake investment schemes between 1998 and 2010.

  • August 17, 2018

    Feds Fire Back At Sheldon Silver's Post-Conviction Bail Bid

    Federal prosecutors on Thursday rejected as “baseless” a request by Sheldon Silver to stay free while appealing his conviction and seven-year sentence for political corruption, telling a Manhattan federal judge that the jury that convicted the former New York Assembly speaker had clear instructions.

  • August 17, 2018

    Ex-Katten Atty Gets 18 Months In Prison For Shkreli Fraud

    Former Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP attorney Evan Greebel on Friday was sentenced to 18 months in prison over allegations that he aided now-imprisoned former pharmaceutical executive Martin Shkreli in defrauding Retrophin Inc.

  • August 17, 2018

    Anderson Kill Woos Back Insurance Pro From Lowenstein

    Anderson Kill has lured back a former insurance recovery team member after a two-decade absence, nabbing him from his most recent home, Lowenstein Sandler, the new firm announced.

  • August 17, 2018

    6th Circ. Revives Compressor Co.'s TCPA Class Action

    The Sixth Circuit on Thursday revived a Telephone Consumer Protection Act class action brought over spam faxes sent to a car compressor company by a finance company that targeted manufacturers, ruling that a reasonable juror could find that the ads were sent "on behalf of" the financial firm.

  • August 17, 2018

    Prenda 'Porn Troll' Atty Pleads Guilty To Fraud Charges

    A former attorney who filed thousands of copyright suits over pornography in an elaborate scheme known as Prenda Law reached an agreement Friday to plead guilty to federal fraud and money laundering conspiracy charges.

  • August 17, 2018

    Soccer Federation Docs Will Show Antitrust Plot, League Says

    The North American Soccer League has asked a New York federal court to compel the U.S. Soccer Federation to produce documents and text messages from before 2008, saying the records will prove an alleged antitrust conspiracy against the league.

  • August 17, 2018

    Rising Star: Greenberg Traurig's Bina Palnitkar

    Bina Palnitkar of Greenberg Traurig LLP has played a key role in high-profile trials, helping C.R. Bard defend transvaginal mesh suits and first-chairing a multimillion-dollar trial win for a consulting company, earning her a spot as one of five attorneys under age 40 honored as Law360's trials Rising Stars.

  • August 17, 2018

    600 Lb Gorillas Gets $725K Of $3.9M Sought In Dessert Spat

    Novelty dessert company 600 lb Gorillas was awarded a fraction of the $3.9 million it sought in a breach of contract suit over allegedly subpar ice cream, getting only $725,000 from a Massachusetts federal jury on Friday, while its supplier Mister Cookie Face was handed the full $270,000 it wanted for a counterclaim over being stuck with unused ice cream sandwiches.

  • August 16, 2018

    $25M Beats Royalties Winner Likely Getting Interest, Fees

    A California judge on Thursday tentatively ruled that an entrepreneur who won $25.25 million at trial for his work on Beats Electronics LLC’s first headphones is entitled to roughly $5.6 million in prejudgment interest, and said that he will likely award attorneys’ fees in the future.

  • August 16, 2018

    Double Jeopardy Saves 3 Ex-Georgeson Advisers From Retrial

    Double jeopardy prevents the federal government from retrying a trio of former Georgeson LLC advisers after a mistrial was declared when prosecutors refused to proceed with the fraud case after a juror exited on its penultimate day, a Massachusetts judge ruled Thursday.

  • August 16, 2018

    Will Law Schools Start Counting ‘Generation ADA’?

    No one is tracking law students with disabilities to see where the education system may be failing them, but some advocates are working to change this dynamic and build a better pipeline.

  • August 16, 2018

    DirecTV Ducks Most Of FTC’s $4B False Ad Case

    A California federal judge culled most of the Federal Trade Commission's $4 billion false advertising suit against DirecTV on Thursday, ruling that the agency didn't have evidence strong enough to meet the "extraordinary ambition" of showing that over 40,000 ads deceived consumers.

Expert Analysis

  • Peering Behind The Peer Review Curtain

    William Childs

    The U.S. Supreme Court's opinion in Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals specified peer review as one criterion for evaluating scientific evidence. But not all peer review is created equal, and sometimes additional exploration — whether through discovery into your adversaries’ experts, or early investigation of your own potential experts — may make sense, says William Childs of Bowman and Brooke LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Lipez Reviews 'Last Great Colonial Lawyer'

    Judge Kermit Lipez

    In his new book, "The Last Great Colonial Lawyer: The Life and Legacy of Jeremiah Gridley," Charles McKirdy argues that Gridley — someone I had never heard of — was the last great colonial lawyer, and that his cases illuminate his times. The author largely substantiates both claims, says First Circuit Judge Kermit Lipez.

  • Ensnarement — A 2nd Bite At The Noninfringement Apple

    Brian D. Coggio

    Ensnarement is a potent defense to a finding of infringement under the doctrine of equivalents, as seen last month when a Massachusetts federal court granted Celltrion’s motion for summary judgment of noninfringement, holding that Janssen’s proposed hypothetical claims ensnared the prior art, say Brian D. Coggio and Ron Vogel of Fish & Richardson PC.

  • Why A Hoverboard Suit Against Amazon Went Up In Flames

    Jed Winer

    Should an e-commerce firm be held liable for the defects of every item it sells on its global internet marketplace? The plaintiffs in Fox v. Amazon.com argued exactly that, and the district court answered with a resounding “no.” Online marketplaces are simply not in a position to supervise every product sold on their platforms, says Jed Winer of Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP.

  • Interview Essentials For Attorneys On The Move

    Eileen Decker

    Across the country this fall, recent law school graduates, law firm associates and experienced professionals will interview for positions in private practice and government service. Sharing tips on how to stand out in this high-pressure, hypercompetitive process are Eileen Decker, former U.S. attorney for the Central District of California, and Keith Jacoby, co-chairman of Littler Mendelson PC’s class action practice group.

  • Roundup

    Clerking For Ginsburg

    Clerking For Ginsburg

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg joined the U.S. Supreme Court 25 years ago and is not planning to retire anytime soon — she has hired clerks through 2020. What's it like to assist Justice Ginsburg? In this series, former clerks reflect on the experience.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 3 Surprises

    David Post

    It had never occurred to me that judges don’t always love the way their appellate cousins review their work and tell them — in public — all the things they got wrong. I was frequently struck by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s acute awareness of the delicacy of this relationship, says attorney David Post.

  • Employment Litigation And Jury Opinions In A #MeToo World

    Ellen Brickman

    Jurors’ beliefs about social inequality, intergroup differences and disparate treatment are likely to play a role in their evaluations of discrimination and harassment claims, especially in the current political climate. To understand that role better, we undertook a survey of registered voters in New York and Los Angeles, say Ellen Brickman and Chad Lackey of DOAR Inc.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: A Superhero Supreme

    Burden Walker

    As a clerk for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, my job was to mirror my boss’ views and values in everything I did. Years later, I find that I am still striving to live up to the values Justice Ginsburg instilled in me, as both a lawyer and a spouse, says Burden Walker, an assistant U.S. attorney for the District of Maryland.

  • 2 Strikes And You’re Out: The Litvak Saga Comes To An End

    Joon Kim

    The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Connecticut, following reversals of two prior convictions, has moved to dismiss its remaining securities fraud claim against bond trader Jesse Litvak. While it can be difficult to prove misstatements are material as a matter of law, the government's move is certainly not a death knell for similarly grounded fraud charges, say attorneys with Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP.