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Trials

  • October 19, 2018

    Jury Hears Ex-Barclays Trader's Worries As Gov't Case Ends

    Jurors in the antitrust trial of three former foreign exchange traders for Citigroup, Barclays PLC and JPMorgan Chase & Co. units on Friday heard a recording of a former Barclays trader voice concern about his allegedly collusive trading behavior in the forex market as prosecutors wrapped up their witness testimony.

  • October 19, 2018

    Harvard Trial Delves Into Email Warnings On Admissions Data

    Harvard officials were cautioned against trumpeting the school's admissions boost for low-income students in 2013 because doing so would call attention to more "controversial" data about whether Asian-Americans faced discrimination in the process, according to emails discussed Friday in the closely watched trial.

  • October 19, 2018

    Emerson Electric Can't Shake $14.7M HVAC Injury Verdict

    A Texas appeals court on Thursday affirmed a $14.7 million trial win by an HVAC technician who was seriously injured when an Emerson Electric compressor ignited him with a spray of scalding oil, ruling that the technician’s training did not negate the need for Emerson to issue adequate warnings.

  • October 19, 2018

    Workers Acquitted Of Lying About Fatal Water Slide Accident

    A Kansas jury on Thursday acquitted two water park maintenance workers on charges of lying to investigators looking into the death of a 10-year-old boy on the since-closed world’s tallest water slide at the Schlitterbahn amusement park in Kansas City.

  • October 19, 2018

    NCAA Athletes Rip 'Myth' Of Amateurism In Trial Closings

    NCAA athletes on Friday blasted the association's rules limiting athlete compensation in written closing arguments of a landmark antitrust trial, arguing that fans won't stop watching college sports if athletes are paid and amateurism is an "economically invalid" myth.

  • October 19, 2018

    Texas Justices To Hear IBM's $17.5M Software Contract Row

    The Texas Supreme Court on Friday granted review to IBM Corp. in its bid to overturn a $17.5 million jury award in favor of Lufkin Industries LLC stemming from a software contract.

  • October 19, 2018

    HP Unit Owes Startup $2.3M For Software Work

    A California federal jury found Friday that a Hewlett Packard unit must pay a software startup more than $2.3 million for work on a Malaysian banking project, while clearing HP on many of the allegations in a contract suit that sought tens of millions in damages.

  • October 19, 2018

    Tax Prep Biz Owner Gets 9 Years Over Bogus Returns

    The owner of a tax preparation company was sentenced Friday in a Virginia federal court to nine years in prison for preparing thousands of tax returns for clients who claimed bogus tax credits and expenses.

  • October 19, 2018

    Split $6M Burden Evenly In Asbestos Case, Pa. Justices Urged

    The winners of a $6.4 million asbestos verdict are urging the Pennsylvania Supreme Court to find that responsibility for the award could be split evenly among each of the eight liable defendants in the case despite a state law establishing a system of proportional division of damages.

  • October 19, 2018

    Dental Supplier Calls FTC Case Textbook 'Regulatory Hubris'

    A major U.S. dental supply company has accused the Federal Trade Commission of "severe hindsight bias" in the commission's suit alleging three suppliers conspired to spurn buying groups, asking an administrative law judge to toss the agency's action.

  • October 19, 2018

    Fake Patient Names Take Center Stage At 3rd NECC Trial

    In the first week of a trial in Massachusetts federal court for six former employees of the New England Compounding Center, whose contaminated drugs sparked a deadly meningitis outbreak in 2012, the question of who bears responsibility for fake patient names used on prescription order forms has been a daily point of contention.

  • October 19, 2018

    J&J Unit Agrees To Risperdal Deal Ahead Of Philly Trial

    In advance of a trial that was slated to get underway Monday in Pennsylvania state court, a Johnson & Johnson unit has agreed to settle claims from a Mississippi family who says their son developed breasts after taking the antipsychotic drug Risperdal to treat a conduct disorder.

  • October 18, 2018

    Los Angeles Keeps Trial Win In Teen Pedestrian Death Suit

    A California state appeals court has affirmed a defense verdict in a suit accusing the city of Los Angeles of creating a dangerous condition at an intersection where a 17-year-old pedestrian was struck and killed, saying certain trial evidence was properly excluded.

  • October 18, 2018

    NY Trial Set To Determine Owner Of Contested Crypto Platform

    A business developer accused of sneaking her name onto corporate paperwork to steal control of a budding peer-to-peer cryptocurrency platform agreed Thursday to an expedited Nov. 5 trial in Manhattan to determine whether she rightfully owns the platform.

  • October 18, 2018

    West Va. Jury Awards $1.2M In Pradaxa Blood Thinner Case

    A West Virginia federal jury has awarded $1.25 million to the family of a woman who died while taking Boehringer Ingelheim’s blood thinner Pradaxa, the first time a jury has awarded damages to a consumer alleging injuries from the drug.

  • October 18, 2018

    Crash Victims Ask 8th Circ. To Cut Firm’s Fees In Toyota Row

    The victims of a fatal 2006 crash have urged the Eighth Circuit to uphold a ruling that cut the fee award allotted to one of their representatives, the Padden Law Firm PLLC, arguing that the lower court correctly reduced the award because Padden "did little or no substantive work."

  • October 18, 2018

    Adidas Exec Didn't Take One Nickel Out Of Greed, Jury Told

    The former Adidas marketing boss charged with defrauding National Collegiate Athletic Association schools by paying young basketball stars on the sly didn't take any payout — not "one nickel" — for the alleged criminal conduct, his lawyer told a Manhattan jury on Thursday, rejecting prosecutors' assertion that he was motivated by greed.

  • October 18, 2018

    Harvard Officials Testify They Don't Use Racial Quotas

    An applicant's race can factor into admission to Harvard University, but the Ivy League school has never used "quotas" or "floors" in its bid to achieve a diverse campus, admissions officials testified Thursday on the fourth day of a bench trial in a case accusing the school of discriminating against Asian-Americans.

  • October 18, 2018

    Short Opinion Doesn’t Merit New Trial, Pa. Justices Say

    A Pennsylvania appeals court has to take another crack at interpreting the record in a construction defect case, the state’s high court ruled Wednesday in a decision that found a laconic lower court ruling didn’t warrant forcing a homeowner and builder back into a new trial.

  • October 18, 2018

    Jury Told Of Seized Drugs, Unsafe Workplace At NECC Trial

    A prosecutor wearing purple protective gloves in Massachusetts federal court on Thursday presented a series of apparently expired drugs seized from the New England Compounding Center in 2012 as the government tried to build its case that the facility's operations were sloppy and unsafe before a deadly meningitis outbreak that killed dozens of people.

Expert Analysis

  • Need Litigation Finance? Don't Skip These 5 Steps

    Molly Pease

    The process of applying for litigation financing isn’t difficult, but few do it right the first time. Following five steps in your application process will help make sure litigation funders are convinced of the value of your company's legal claims, says Molly Pease of Curiam Capital LLC.

  • Inventor's Case Highlights Appeal Option For Rejected Patent

    Pauline Pelletier

    ​When a rejected patent​ application ​is appealed to the Patent Trial and Appeal Board​ unsuccessfully, ​the standard next step is Federal Circuit appeal. ​But an alternative route is to sue the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in district court. The recent decision in Gilbert Hyatt v. Iancu offers insight into this Section 145 process, say attorneys with Sterne Kessler Goldstein & Fox PLLC.​

  • A Holistic Approach To Client Retention

    Dan Tacone

    In an era when law firms are fighting for business and clients can dictate the terms of the relationship, "value" has become a moving target. Firms that take a proactive approach by using strategies designed to articulate value over time will gain the competitive advantage, says Dan Tacone at Intapp Inc.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Allens Pricing Chief Pier D'Angelo

    Pier D'Angelo

    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Pier D'Angelo, chief pricing and practice officer at Allens.

  • Tax Evasion Knows No Borders

    Kim Marie Boylan

    The former CEO of a U.K. bank recently pled guilty to charges under the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act, following a U.S. Department of Justice sting operation spanning several countries. The conviction sends a clear message that U.S. authorities will prosecute not only U.S. account holders, but those who facilitate tax evasion, whatever their nationality, say attorneys at White & Case LLP.

  • Opinion

    The ABA Was Dead Wrong About Model Rule 8.4(g)

    Bradley Abramson

    In the two years since the American Bar Association's controversial anti-discrimination and harassment rule, only one state has adopted it, while numerous state supreme courts, state attorneys general and legal groups have correctly rejected Model Rule 8.4(g) as a threat to lawyers' First Amendment rights, says Bradley Abramson, an attorney with Alliance Defending Freedom.

  • What Akorn Teaches Us About Delaware MAC Clauses

    David Leinwand

    Until Vice Chancellor J. Travis Laster’s decision this month in Akorn v. Fresenius, no Delaware court had released a buyer from its obligation to close a transaction as a result of a material adverse effect or change. But we expect the conventional wisdom to continue to hold true — that it is extremely difficult for an acquirer to establish the occurrence of a MAC, say attorneys with Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP.

  • Opinion

    The Supreme Court Should Become Boring

    Alexander Klein

    In the aftermath of Justice Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation, the U.S. Supreme Court should decline review of the nation's most polarizing political questions unless and until the questions become time-sensitive, says Alexander Klein, head of the commercial litigation group at Barket Epstein Kearon Aldea & LoTurco LLP.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: BC's Kent Greenfield Talks Corporate Law

    Kent Greenfield

    In this series featuring law school luminaries, Boston College Law School professor Kent Greenfield reflects on his corporate law theories, his legal battle with the Pentagon over free speech and gay rights, and important constitutional law issues to watch out for.

  • Avoid Overlap In Trade Secret And Misappropriation Claims

    Mareesa Frederick

    As highlighted in the Federal Circuit's recent decision in Texas Advanced v. Renesas, plaintiffs hoping to assert trade secret misappropriation and patent infringement claims in the same lawsuit must craft damage theories carefully to avoid running afoul of the prohibition against double recovery, say attorneys at Finnegan Henderson Farabow Garrett & Dunner LLP.