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Trials

  • October 12, 2018

    Mercedes Manager Fired After Laryngectomy Awarded $5M

    A Washington federal jury on Thursday awarded nearly $5 million to a former Mercedes Benz of Seattle finance director who claims he was wrongfully fired after receiving a prosthetic voice box as a result of undergoing surgery for throat cancer.

  • October 12, 2018

    ‘Cheerleading’ Not Fraud, HP Atty Tells Startup Trial Jury

    A Hewlett Packard Malaysia manager was merely "cheerleading" when she described possible future work to a startup that now claims it was duped into providing tens of millions of dollars in free services and software, HP's attorney argued Friday at the close of a California federal trial.

  • October 12, 2018

    Jury Clears Former SD School Exec In Contract Coverup

    A South Dakota jury has acquitted the former head of a proposed Black Hills school of charges he backdated contracts to avoid a potential audit after the school’s chief financial officer killed himself and his family amid theft accusations, according to news reports.

  • October 12, 2018

    W.Va. Ex-Justice Who Took Famous Desk Guilty Of Fraud

    Former West Virginia Supreme Court Justice Allen Loughry was convicted Friday on 11 counts of fraud, witness tampering and false statements after prosecutors said he helped himself to government transportation and court furniture, including a historic desk associated with an early celebrity architect.

  • October 12, 2018

    Ex-UBS Forex Trader Says 'Cartel' Used Chats To Collude

    A former foreign currency exchange trader for Barclays PLC and UBS Group AG on Friday told a Manhattan federal jury that he and three other forex traders at rival banks used a chatroom dubbed “the cartel” to coordinate their euro-U.S. dollar deals, including those tied to benchmark fix rates.

  • October 12, 2018

    FTC Accuses Dental Supply Cos. Of Refusing Discount Sales

    The Federal Trade Commission on Tuesday accused three dental supply companies of conspiring through email and in-person communication to refuse to offer discounts to buying groups on the ground that the groups could cut into the companies’ profit margins.

  • October 12, 2018

    Breaking Down The Prop 65 Trial That Has Starbucks On Edge

    On Monday, dozens of companies that sell coffee in California will try to convince a California judge that they shouldn’t pay any penalties for violating the state’s cancer-warning statute Proposition 65, in the final phase of a long-brewing case about the presence of the chemical acrylamide in coffee. Here, Law360 takes a look at the case in advance of the trial.

  • October 12, 2018

    Tire Co. Seeks To Bar Rival From Selling 5K Copycat Tires

    Tire maker OTR Wheel Engineering Inc. urged a Washington federal judge on Thursday to stop West Worldwide from selling nearly 5,000 tires, saying they were the same products at issue in its Lanham Act trial win, which was recently upheld by the Ninth Circuit.

  • October 12, 2018

    Pa. Jury Convicts 'Deal-Closer' In $54M Ponzi Scheme

    A Pennsylvania federal jury on Friday convicted a former insurance salesman for his role as the deal-closer in a $54 million Ponzi scheme that had naive investors pouring cash into bogus land and green energy investments.

  • October 12, 2018

    Texas Jury Clears DynaEnergetics In Well-Drilling Patent Suit

    An Eastern District of Texas federal jury has handed a win to DynaEnergetics US Inc. after rival GeoDynamics Inc. accused it at trial of infringing a patent related to fracking technology, finding the claims of the patent were not infringed and were invalid as obvious.

  • October 12, 2018

    2 Fraud-Convicted Pharma Analysts Denied Acquittal Bids

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Friday rejected a plea for acquittal and a new trial by two pharmaceutical statisticians awaiting sentencing for securities fraud, denying their argument that prosecutors improperly presented evidence of two separate stock tip conspiracies to a jury after saying they would present just one.

  • October 11, 2018

    HP Treated Startup Like Slaves, Jury Told As Trial Wraps

    A startup alleging Hewlett Packard took tens of millions of dollars in software and services for a Malaysian banking-system project without paying it told jurors during closing arguments Thursday it was roped into “involuntary servitude," while HP's lawyers countered the startup improperly threatened to walk off the job.

  • October 11, 2018

    Fidelity Asks 1st Circ. To End Decade-Old Whistleblower Case

    Fidelity Investments has asked the First Circuit to uphold a jury verdict absolving the company of terminating a finance director who won whistleblower protections from the U.S. Supreme Court then lost her claims of retaliation at trial, calling for the end of the former employee’s decade-old lawsuit.

  • October 11, 2018

    Ex-NECC Owner’s Income Fair Game At Meningitis Trial

    Federal prosecutors can tell a Boston jury about the income of a former part-owner and director of the shuttered New England Compounding Center linked to a fatal outbreak of fungal meningitis, a judge ruled Thursday, denying his motion that argued the information would appeal to jurors’ class bias in the trial of six NECC employees that begins Monday.

  • October 11, 2018

    Jury Questions Can't Undo Verdict In Stroke Diagnosis Row

    A split Iowa appeals court on Wednesday affirmed the defense verdict rendered in a trial over claims that a doctor exacerbated the effects of a stroke by failing to immediately diagnose it, saying a court didn’t abuse its discretion when it decided that jury questions about damages didn’t indicate the jury was confused.

  • October 11, 2018

    Trans University Staffers Win $780K Over Bias About Surgery

    A Wisconsin federal jury awarded over $780,000 on Wednesday to two transgender women who were denied gender-confirming medical care by a state health plan through the University of Wisconsin.

  • October 11, 2018

    Hoops Trial Judge Blocks Effort To Blow Whistle On NCAA

    The Manhattan federal judge handling the trial of three men accused of defrauding college basketball by paying amateurs to lure them to schools tied to Adidas cut off a defense effort to suggest the NCAA and its schools have long known about the secret flow of cash on Thursday, calling the line of attack "inappropriate."

  • October 11, 2018

    Fiat Chrysler Asks Justices To Review Car-Hacking Cert. Order

    Fiat Chrysler has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to allow it to immediately appeal an Illinois district court’s certification of drivers claiming Jeep Cherokees were vulnerable to hacking, saying the Seventh Circuit ignored “manifest errors” in the class certification order that cleared the way for a multistate trial.

  • October 11, 2018

    J&J Scores Trial Win In NJ Asbestos Talc Case

    Johnson & Johnson defeated claims in New Jersey state court Thursday that a woman's alleged exposure to asbestos in its baby powder contributed to her mesothelioma, scoring a jury trial win about six months after the company and a co-defendant were slapped with verdicts totaling $117 million in a similar case.

  • October 10, 2018

    Monsanto Nears $250M Slash Of Landmark Roundup Verdict

    A California judge seemed poised Wednesday to throw out a jury's $250 million award for punitive damages against Monsanto, finding in a tentative ruling that the plaintiff — a groundskeeper who alleged Roundup weedkiller caused his lymphoma — hadn't proved any malicious intent by the agrochemical giant.

Expert Analysis

  • Knowledge Management: An Unsung Hero Of Legal Innovation

    Rob MacAdam

    As technology evolves, law firms are increasingly looking for ways to improve communication, transparency and service for their clients. Firms should put knowledge management at the core of their value proposition to create a competitive advantage, says Rob MacAdam at HighQ.

  • Defamation In Litigation: A Primer On Privileges In NY

    Jonathan Bloom

    Under New York law, statements made in court and other litigation-related communications are, in most cases, privileged. But these privileges have limits, and it behooves litigants — particularly those inclined to speak publicly about their cases — to be aware of them, says Jonathan Bloom of Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP.

  • Akorn Could Alter 'Material Adverse Effect' Law In Delaware

    J.B. Heaton

    The Delaware Chancery Court's opinion this week in the Fresenius-Akorn merger dispute will likely be appealed. That appeal will determine whether this case is destined to change the understanding of material adverse effect, or whether the Chancery Court overreached on the law and the facts, says J.B. Heaton of the University of Chicago Law School.

  • Limiting The Scope Of Discovery Through Contract

    Brian Koosed

    Carefully drafted provisions in M&A and other transaction documents can be used to preemptively restrict some of the parties’ discovery rights in future litigation. There is strong reason to believe that courts will find such provisions to be enforceable, say attorneys with K&L Gates LLP.

  • Opinion

    Skip The New 'Civility Courses' And Think Like A Lawyer

    Alex Dimitrief

    As we watch what passes for political discourse in our nation’s capital, it’s understandable that universities are launching programs on how to cope with ideological disputes. But our country needs fewer people who profess to be open-minded and more people who engage in and honor the conclusions of reasoned debates, says Alex Dimitrief of General Electric Co.

  • Why Law Firms Should Monitor The Dark Web

    Anju Chopra

    Dark web monitoring allows law firms to see what sensitive information may have made its way onto the thriving global underground marketplace where cybercriminals buy and sell exposed data. It can also help lawyers advise clients on a wide range of legal and business matters, say Anju Chopra and Brian Lapidus of Kroll.

  • Does Rule 45 Protect Nonparties From Undue Burden?

    Matthew Hamilton

    Interpretations of Rule 45 protections vary but what's clear is that "undue burden" does not mean no burden at all. To avoid the costs of compliance with a subpoena, a nonparty should be ready to demonstrate its disinterest in the litigation and the anticipated cost and burden of compliance, say attorneys at Pepper Hamilton LLP.

  • Try Using Neutrals For State Court ESI Disputes

    Robert Wilkins

    According to the Florida Rules of Civil Procedure, cooperating with opposing counsel to resolve electronically stored information disputes is not required in litigation that is not designated as complex, unless provided for by an individual judge or in certain circuits. But mandated or not, this is a best practice in any state court action, says Robert Wilkins of Jones Foster Johnston & Stubbs PA.

  • 5 More GC Tips For Succeeding As A New Associate

    Jason Idilbi

    Jason Idilbi, former BigLaw associate and general counsel of the tech startup Passport Labs Inc., returns to Law360 to share recent thoughts on best practices for newer associates — whether they are serving external clients or senior attorneys within their firms.

  • Manafort Plea Reminds Us Of Whitewater

    Lawrence Laurenzi

    It is clear from Paul Manafort's plea agreement that special counsel Robert Mueller's team is using the same prosecutorial strategy that Ken Starr used in Whitewater. Mueller’s team, however, also faces the same headwinds that Starr faced, say Lawrence Laurenzi and Joe Whitley of Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz PC.