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Trials

  • October 12, 2018

    Jury Clears Former SD School Exec In Contract Coverup

    A South Dakota jury has acquitted the former head of a proposed Black Hills school of charges he backdated contracts to avoid a potential audit after the school’s chief financial officer killed himself and his family amid theft accusations, according to news reports.

  • October 12, 2018

    W.Va. Ex-Justice Who Took Famous Desk Guilty Of Fraud

    Former West Virginia Supreme Court Justice Allen Loughry was convicted Friday on 11 counts of fraud, witness tampering and false statements after prosecutors said he helped himself to government transportation and court furniture, including a historic desk associated with an early celebrity architect.

  • October 12, 2018

    Ex-UBS Forex Trader Says 'Cartel' Used Chats To Collude

    A former foreign currency exchange trader for Barclays PLC and UBS Group AG on Friday told a Manhattan federal jury that he and three other forex traders at rival banks used a chatroom dubbed “the cartel” to coordinate their euro-U.S. dollar deals, including those tied to benchmark fix rates.

  • October 12, 2018

    FTC Accuses Dental Supply Cos. Of Refusing Discount Sales

    The Federal Trade Commission on Tuesday accused three dental supply companies of conspiring through email and in-person communication to refuse to offer discounts to buying groups on the ground that the groups could cut into the companies’ profit margins.

  • October 12, 2018

    Breaking Down The Prop 65 Trial That Has Starbucks On Edge

    On Monday, dozens of companies that sell coffee in California will try to convince a California judge that they shouldn’t pay any penalties for violating the state’s cancer-warning statute Proposition 65, in the final phase of a long-brewing case about the presence of the chemical acrylamide in coffee. Here, Law360 takes a look at the case in advance of the trial.

  • October 12, 2018

    Tire Co. Seeks To Bar Rival From Selling 5K Copycat Tires

    Tire maker OTR Wheel Engineering Inc. urged a Washington federal judge on Thursday to stop West Worldwide from selling nearly 5,000 tires, saying they were the same products at issue in its Lanham Act trial win, which was recently upheld by the Ninth Circuit.

  • October 12, 2018

    Pa. Jury Convicts 'Deal-Closer' In $54M Ponzi Scheme

    A Pennsylvania federal jury on Friday convicted a former insurance salesman for his role as the deal-closer in a $54 million Ponzi scheme that had naive investors pouring cash into bogus land and green energy investments.

  • October 12, 2018

    Texas Jury Clears DynaEnergetics In Well-Drilling Patent Suit

    An Eastern District of Texas federal jury has handed a win to DynaEnergetics US Inc. after rival GeoDynamics Inc. accused it at trial of infringing a patent related to fracking technology, finding the claims of the patent were not infringed and were invalid as obvious.

  • October 12, 2018

    2 Fraud-Convicted Pharma Analysts Denied Acquittal Bids

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Friday rejected a plea for acquittal and a new trial by two pharmaceutical statisticians awaiting sentencing for securities fraud, denying their argument that prosecutors improperly presented evidence of two separate stock tip conspiracies to a jury after saying they would present just one.

  • October 11, 2018

    HP Treated Startup Like Slaves, Jury Told As Trial Wraps

    A startup alleging Hewlett Packard took tens of millions of dollars in software and services for a Malaysian banking-system project without paying it told jurors during closing arguments Thursday it was roped into “involuntary servitude," while HP's lawyers countered the startup improperly threatened to walk off the job.

  • October 11, 2018

    Fidelity Asks 1st Circ. To End Decade-Old Whistleblower Case

    Fidelity Investments has asked the First Circuit to uphold a jury verdict absolving the company of terminating a finance director who won whistleblower protections from the U.S. Supreme Court then lost her claims of retaliation at trial, calling for the end of the former employee’s decade-old lawsuit.

  • October 11, 2018

    Ex-NECC Owner’s Income Fair Game At Meningitis Trial

    Federal prosecutors can tell a Boston jury about the income of a former part-owner and director of the shuttered New England Compounding Center linked to a fatal outbreak of fungal meningitis, a judge ruled Thursday, denying his motion that argued the information would appeal to jurors’ class bias in the trial of six NECC employees that begins Monday.

  • October 11, 2018

    Jury Questions Can't Undo Verdict In Stroke Diagnosis Row

    A split Iowa appeals court on Wednesday affirmed the defense verdict rendered in a trial over claims that a doctor exacerbated the effects of a stroke by failing to immediately diagnose it, saying a court didn’t abuse its discretion when it decided that jury questions about damages didn’t indicate the jury was confused.

  • October 11, 2018

    Trans University Staffers Win $780K Over Bias About Surgery

    A Wisconsin federal jury awarded over $780,000 on Wednesday to two transgender women who were denied gender-confirming medical care by a state health plan through the University of Wisconsin.

  • October 11, 2018

    Hoops Trial Judge Blocks Effort To Blow Whistle On NCAA

    The Manhattan federal judge handling the trial of three men accused of defrauding college basketball by paying amateurs to lure them to schools tied to Adidas cut off a defense effort to suggest the NCAA and its schools have long known about the secret flow of cash on Thursday, calling the line of attack "inappropriate."

  • October 11, 2018

    Fiat Chrysler Asks Justices To Review Car-Hacking Cert. Order

    Fiat Chrysler has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to allow it to immediately appeal an Illinois district court’s certification of drivers claiming Jeep Cherokees were vulnerable to hacking, saying the Seventh Circuit ignored “manifest errors” in the class certification order that cleared the way for a multistate trial.

  • October 11, 2018

    J&J Scores Trial Win In NJ Asbestos Talc Case

    Johnson & Johnson defeated claims in New Jersey state court Thursday that a woman's alleged exposure to asbestos in its baby powder contributed to her mesothelioma, scoring a jury trial win about six months after the company and a co-defendant were slapped with verdicts totaling $117 million in a similar case.

  • October 10, 2018

    Monsanto Nears $250M Slash Of Landmark Roundup Verdict

    A California judge seemed poised Wednesday to throw out a jury's $250 million award for punitive damages against Monsanto, finding in a tentative ruling that the plaintiff — a groundskeeper who alleged Roundup weedkiller caused his lymphoma — hadn't proved any malicious intent by the agrochemical giant.

  • October 10, 2018

    Faulty J-M Pipes Will Cost Cities $15M, Bellwether Jury Told

    Several cities and water utilities that bought J-M Eagle plastic pipes told a California jury Wednesday that roughly a third of the pipes would fail ahead of schedule and asked for around $15 million in damages plus penalties potentially worth millions more during opening statements in a bellwether trial in the sprawling False Claims Act dispute.

  • October 10, 2018

    Forex 'Cartel' Traders Cheated The Market, Jury Hears

    Using a private chatroom dubbed “the cartel,” three former foreign currency exchange traders for Barclays PLC, Citigroup Inc. and JPMorgan Chase & Co. units colluded to suppress competition in the forex market, a federal prosecutor said Wednesday as the trio's criminal forex-rigging trial began.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Block Reviews 'Tough Cases'

    Judge Frederic Block

    In a new, extraordinary book, "Tough Cases: Judges Tell the Stories of Some of the Hardest Decisions They’ve Ever Made," 13 of my judicial brethren have courageously and dramatically humanized the judicial process, says U.S. District Judge Frederic Block of the Eastern District of New York.

  • 8 Innovative Ways To Empower Jurors

    Christopher Campbell

    Much time and attention have been focused on improving lawyers' abilities to communicate with and persuade juries in complex trials. But it is equally important to equip and prepare jurors to become better students in the courtroom, say attorneys with DLA Piper and Litstrat Inc.

  • Cloud Computing Clearly The Future For Small Firms

    Holly Urban

    While in-house technology investments on the scale and complexity needed to compete with large firms remain cost prohibitive for small and midsize law firms, cloud-based services offer significant cost savings and productivity gains with little to no capital investment, says Holly Urban of Effortless Legal LLC.

  • Leveraging Today's Lateral Associate Market

    Darin Morgan

    With the Milbank/Cravath pay scale once again equalizing compensation at many Am Law 100 firms, there is even more pressure for firms to differentiate themselves to top lateral associate candidates. This presents strategic considerations for both law firms and lateral candidates throughout the recruitment process, says Darin Morgan of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • Opinion

    What I Learned As Lehman's Bankruptcy Lawyer

    Andrew Rossman

    I have spent nearly 10 years fighting in court for the rights of Lehman Brothers’ creditors. This arduous legal journey has yielded insights into weaknesses in our financial system and bankruptcy laws that could allow catastrophic losses to happen again, says Andrew Rossman of Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: Stanford's Jeff Fisher Talks Supreme Court

    Jeffrey Fisher

    In this series featuring law school luminaries, Stanford Law School professor Jeffrey Fisher discusses his motivation for teaching, arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court and what the court might look like if Judge Brett Kavanaugh is confirmed.

  • Genetic Data Holds Opportunities And Risks For Litigants

    Kirk Hartley

    A recently published research paper concludes that a significant proportion of patients with malignant mesotheliomas carry inherited mutations in cancer-associated genes. Well-informed lawyers on both sides of the aisle can effectively use such data to materially alter the outcome of cases, say Kirk Hartley and David Schwartz of ToxicoGenomica.

  • NJ Trial Court Error Resulted In Years Of Litigation

    Lawrence Shapiro

    The New Jersey Appellate Division's reversal in Torah v. Aryeh should serve as a warning for trial judges faced with proceedings arising from an arbitration award. When statutes are involved, their language must be strictly followed, and although arbitration is preferred to litigation, it cannot be coerced or compelled, say Lawrence Shapiro and Nicole Miller of Ansell Grimm & Aaron PC.

  • Calif.'s New Rules For Lawyers Move Closer To ABA Model

    Mark Loeterman

    The first comprehensive overhaul of California's Rules of Professional Conduct in nearly 30 years becomes operational on Nov. 1. Some of the new rules mirror the model language used by the American Bar Association, but many continue to reflect California’s unique approach to certain ethical questions, says Mark Loeterman of Signature Resolution LLC.

  • Know The Limits To Atty Public Statements During A Trial

    Matthew Giardina

    The balancing act between protecting attorneys’ speech rights and ensuring unbiased adjudications was highlighted recently in two cases — when Michael Cohen applied for a restraining order against Stephanie Clifford's attorney, and when Johnson & Johnson questioned whether a Missouri talc verdict was tainted by public statements from the plaintiffs' counsel, says Matthew Giardina of Manning Gross & Massenburg LLP.