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Trials

  • August 13, 2018

    Oil And Gas Co. Denied New Trials Over Workers' OT Awards

    A Pennsylvania federal judge turned down an oil and gas contractor's bid for do-overs on a pair of trials that awarded two groups of workers $1 million in back pay for overtime in addition to the sizable per-job bonuses the company already gave them.

  • August 13, 2018

    Ex-State Street Exec's Post-Verdict Acquittal Bid Denied

    A post-verdict bid for acquittal by a former State Street Corp. vice president convicted of conspiracy and fraud for overbilling clients by millions was denied Monday by the Massachusetts federal judge who oversaw the case, saying he had heard the executive’s arguments before.

  • August 13, 2018

    NJ Court Won't Revive Plastic Co.'s Water Bill Row

    The New Jersey state appeals court on Monday refused to disturb a bench trial verdict in favor of Wayne Township in a plastics company's challenge to water and sewer bills it received over 17 years, reasoning that there was no proof the company had been overcharged.

  • August 13, 2018

    'Come Loaded For Bear' Before Manafort Judge, Attys Say

    Lawyers who have appeared before the Virginia federal judge overseeing the fraud trial of former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort offer two pieces of advice for arguing in his courtroom: Be prepared. Be concise.

  • August 10, 2018

    How The Legal Industry Lets Down Lawyers With Disabilities

    The dissolution of a five-year-old bar group marks the latest setback for disabled attorneys, who often find little support while navigating an inhospitable industry.

  • August 10, 2018

    Gaining Access: Disabled Lawyers Share Their Stories

    In a series of interviews, lawyers tell Law360 how even well-intentioned professors can create barriers, how inclusivity can help a firm’s litigation prowess, and how “inspirational” can be a dirty word.

  • August 10, 2018

    Bank Exec Took 'Personal Interest' In $16M Manafort Loans

    A former Federal Savings Bank officer on Friday provided some of the closest evidence yet connecting Paul Manafort's alleged bank and tax fraud to President Donald Trump's 2016 campaign, testifying that bank chief Stephen M. Calk took an uncomfortably personal interest in $16 million in loans to Trump's former campaign manager.

  • August 10, 2018

    Conn. Justices Say Hospital Can’t Duck $12M Med Mal Award

    The Connecticut Supreme Court said Friday that a hospital can’t escape a jury’s $12 million award in a suit accusing a resident physician of piercing a woman’s colon during surgery, finding the hospital to be vicariously liable for the resident’s negligence.

  • August 10, 2018

    Arctic Cat Can't Get Presuit Damages In Jetski IP Row

    A Florida federal judge on Friday granted Sea-Doo maker Bombardier’s bid to limit the damages it owes ATV maker Arctic Cat for infringing its patented steering technology to the years after Arctic Cat filed suit, ruling that Arctic Cat failed to give notice of the infringement before that.

  • August 10, 2018

    Judge In Ex-PSU Prez's Endangerment Case Won't Recuse

    A Pennsylvania appeals court judge concluded Friday that his decade-old criticism of Penn State University's plans to relocate its law school did not warrant his disqualification from ex-university President Graham Spanier's appeal of a child endangerment conviction stemming from the Jerry Sandusky sex abuse scandal.

  • August 10, 2018

    Roger Stone Aide Held In Contempt For Dodging Mueller

    A former aide to Roger Stone, a Republican political operative and longtime ally of President Donald Trump, has been found in contempt by a D.C. federal judge for refusing to answer questions before a grand jury convened by Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

  • August 10, 2018

    Feds Fight Ex-Barclays FX Trader’s Bid To Toss HP Case

    Prosecutors pushed back on an ex-Barclays trader’s motion to dismiss the criminal “front running” case against him Friday, arguing that the question of whether he had a duty to act in the best interests of Hewlett Packard Co. in a £6 billion foreign currency options transaction can only be determined by a jury.

  • August 10, 2018

    Ky. Court Nixes $21M Award In Unnecessary Pacemaker Suit

    A Kentucky appellate panel on Friday vacated a jury’s $21.2 million award in a suit accusing a hospital and a surgeon of unnecessarily implanting a pacemaker in a patient, saying a new trial is necessary since certain claims against the two defendants should’ve been tried separately.

  • August 10, 2018

    Monsanto Owes $289M In Landmark Roundup Cancer Trial

    A California jury held Friday that Monsanto’s Roundup and Ranger Pro herbicides contributed to a school groundskeeper’s lymphoma and slapped the company with a combined $289 million in compensatory and punitive damages in a landmark suit against the agricultural giant, which has denied links between its herbicides and cancer for decades.

  • August 10, 2018

    SEC Gets $9.6M Judgment Against Galanis For Gerova Fraud

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission nabbed a final judgment against convicted fraudster Jason Galanis that orders him to disgorge more than $9.6 million from proceeds he received through a scheme to illegally procure and then sell off stock in Gerova Financial Group Ltd.

  • August 10, 2018

    McGuireWoods Adds Litigation, Employment Partners

    McGuireWoods has brought husband and wife Yasser and Meghaan Madriz in as partners at the firm's Houston office, bolstering its litigation and labor and employment stable.

  • August 10, 2018

    Man Who Stole Friends’ $7M In Ponzi Scheme Gets 5 Years

    A Massachusetts federal judge sentenced an elderly Texas resident to five years behind bars and denied his bid for acquittal on Wednesday after a jury found him guilty of spending over a decade stealing millions of dollars from his friends and business associates who believed he would invest it for them.

  • August 9, 2018

    In Manafort Trial: 5 Witnesses, 2 Banks And An Airbnb

    Paul Manafort’s Virginia federal jury trial focused Thursday on allegations that President Donald Trump’s former campaign manager tricked banks into giving him millions in loans by hiding his debt on one property and the fact that he was renting out another property through Airbnb, as well as inflating his income with a sham loan from an entity he controlled.

  • August 9, 2018

    Goodyear Seeks New Trial After $40M Asbestos Verdict

    A New York jury has awarded $40.1 million to a man with mesothelioma, placing the bulk of the blame for his asbestos exposure on Goodyear Tire, which has asked for a new trial because of “outrageous remarks” made by the man’s counsel during closing arguments.

  • August 9, 2018

    Calif. Panel Revives Olympic Hopeful's Win Against Atty

    A California state appeals court said in a published opinion that a lower court was wrong to throw out a jury verdict against an attorney over his representation of an Olympic-hopeful athlete in a dispute with USA Swimming, restoring the verdict and directing the court to notify the state bar of the lawyer's conduct.

Expert Analysis

  • NY Commercial Division Backs Technology-Assisted Review

    Elizabeth Sacksteder

    Neither the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure nor most state procedure codes expressly address whether, in what circumstances, or how a party may use technology-assisted review to fulfill its disclosure obligations. A new rule introduced last week by the Commercial Division of the New York Supreme Court aims to fill that gap, say Elizabeth Sacksteder and Ross Gotler of Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP.

  • Why CFPB Should Not Regulate The Practice Of Law

    Joann Needleman

    After a four-day jury trial, an Ohio federal judge ruled this week that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau failed to prove that debt collection law firm Weltman Weinberg & Reis Co. LPA had misled consumers by sending them demand letters. The decision calls into question the CFPB's authority to investigate or bring enforcement actions against collection law firms, says Joann Needleman of Clark Hill PLC.

  • Sentencing May Change With 2 Kennedy Clerks On High Court

    Alan Ellis

    Should Judge Brett Kavanaugh be confirmed to the U.S. Supreme Court, he and Justice Neil Gorsuch — both former clerks for retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy — will likely lead the court to finally rein in "relevant conduct" for federal sentencing, say criminal defense attorneys Alan Ellis and Mark Allenbaugh.

  • The Future Of Authenticating Audio And Video Evidence

    Jonathan Mraunac

    The recent emergence of artificial intelligence-based technology has prompted serious concerns about the future integrity of recordings. Attorneys must think critically about standards for authenticating audio and video evidence as well as legislative and regulatory safeguards to discourage pervasive manipulation and forgery, says Jonathan Mraunac of Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC.

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: A Flood Of MDLs

    Alan Rothman

    At its most recent meeting, the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation considered and denied a petition for an MDL proceeding to centralize flood insurance claims arising from recent hurricanes. The decision shows the careful line the panel must walk when considering petitions featuring cases with a variety of circumstances, says Alan Rothman of Arnold & Porter.

  • Opinion

    Law360's Global 20 Doesn't Acknowledge Global Networks

    Glenn Cunningham

    While I read with interest Law360's report analyzing the top 20 global law firms of 2018, I also noticed it doesn't tell the whole story. Global networks of independent law firms compare favorably with multinational firms in terms of geographic coverage, legal expertise, and awareness of local cultures and customs, says Glenn Cunningham of Interlaw Ltd.

  • The Millennial Juror’s Thoughts On IP

    Johanna Carrane

    Millennials represent more than 25 percent of the U.S. population and grew up immersed in technology. Anyone preparing to face a patent jury should consider how this age group feels about the patent world. Our analysis of 5,000 mock jurors showed two important overall conclusions, say Johanna Carrane and Lynn Fahey of JuryScope Inc.

  • Takeaways From 5th Circ. Wind Farm Scam Case

    Kip Mendrygal

    The misappropriation of funds charge can leave defense attorneys struggling throughout trial to distinguish personal expenses from legitimate business expenses. The Fifth Circuit's decision in U.S. v. Spalding sheds light on how to handle these situations, but also sets out the battles that attorneys won’t win, say Kip Mendrygal and Mario Nguyen of Locke Lord LLP.

  • The Opioid Epidemic: Who Will Jurors Hold Accountable?

    Christina Marinakis

    Hardly a day goes by where we don’t hear about another lawsuit being filed accusing pharmaceutical companies, distributors, hospitals and pharmacies of fueling the country’s addiction to opioids. But without any of these cases reaching a jury to date, it can be difficult to predict how jurors will react to these claims, says Christina Marinakis of Litigation Insights.

  • A Lawyer's Guide To Genomics In Toxic Tort Cases: Part 3

    Kirk Hartley

    Genetic data and techniques are becoming ever more powerful tools for explaining when and how diseases arise. They can also have very strong evidentiary value, and in some toxic tort cases, genetic findings can provide conclusive answers for a judge or jury, say Kirk Hartley and David Schwartz of ToxicoGenomica.