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Trials

  • May 18, 2018

    EEOC Loses Trial Over Rent-A-Center Firing Of Trans Worker

    An Illinois federal jury found Friday that Rent-A-Center East Inc. didn’t illegally fire a transgender employee after she told the company she was transitioning, dealing a loss to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and its argument that the termination flouted federal anti-discrimination law.

  • May 18, 2018

    Axis Win In $2M Truck Crash Coverage Row Upheld In 5th Circ.

    The Fifth Circuit on Friday found Hartford Insurance Co. owes $2 million in coverage for a Louisiana truck accident, rejecting its argument that the wording of the policy limits the kind of vehicles covered.

  • May 18, 2018

    Houston Jury Awards $90M To Family In Trucking Death Case

    A Texas state court jury has hit Werner Enterprises Inc. with a nearly $90 million verdict, finding the trucking company responsible for a 2014 collision that killed a 7-year-old and paralyzed a 12-year-old, attorneys for the family said Friday.

  • May 18, 2018

    Skeloses Get Docs That Could Undermine Developer Witness

    A federal judge ordered a Manhattan developer's general counsel to hand over documents on Thursday that she said could “undermine” testimony expected at the upcoming corruption retrial of New York State Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos and his son Adam.

  • May 18, 2018

    Fed. Circ. Revives $5.4M IP Verdict Nixed By Wis. Judge

    The Federal Circuit revived a $5.4 million verdict against a manufacturer of captioned phones that a Wisconsin federal jury found infringed the asserted claims of a patent covering the devices, holding Friday that a judge erred in tossing the jury’s determination that the patent was valid.

  • May 18, 2018

    Feds Double Down On Union Boss' Graft Retrial

    Manhattan federal prosecutors on Thursday beefed up their case against New York City labor boss Norman Seabrook with a new fraud charge, ahead of a coming retrial over accusations that he took bribes from Platinum Partners in exchange for his union’s investment in the hedge fund.

  • May 18, 2018

    Ala. Justices Nix $10M Med Mal Award For Blind, Deaf Baby

    The Alabama Supreme Court on Friday vacated a $10 million award in a suit accusing a hospital of causing a baby's blindness, deafness and seizure disorder due to a meningitis misdiagnosis, saying a trial judge's improper admission of evidence warrants a new trial.

  • May 17, 2018

    $9.7M Valeant Payment Was Legal, Ex-Execs Argue In Closing

    Prosecutors and two health care businessmen charged with defrauding Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc. out of $9.7 million when it moved to buy mail-order pharmacy Philidor Rx Services LLC made their closing arguments to a Manhattan federal jury on Thursday, advancing competing views of whether Valeant was a victim or a beneficiary of Philidor’s rise.

  • May 17, 2018

    Judge Probes Quinn Attys On 'Games' In Apple-Samsung Trial

    U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh on Thursday ordered Quinn Emanuel attorneys representing Samsung to provide the flight itinerary and boarding pass of a witness they suddenly dropped after Apple rested its case in a billion-dollar California patent damages trial, saying she wants to see if they're "playing games." A trial between Apple and Samsung played out all week in a San Jose courtroom, closing Friday. Here's one of our top-read stories on the proceedings from this week.

  • May 17, 2018

    LA Jury Awards $6.3M To Pedestrian Hit By Tour Bus

    A Los Angeles jury awarded $6.3 million on Wednesday to a woman who was hit by a turning tour bus as she crossed the street at a crosswalk, according to the plaintiff's counsel.

  • May 17, 2018

    Emerson Seeks Peek At Facebook Deal In $30M IP Theft Suit

    Emerson Electric told a skeptical California federal judge Thursday it wants former co-defendant Facebook to disclose its confidential deal to exit BladeRoom Group Ltd.’s trade secret suit, saying any financial settlement could offset the $30 million a jury said it owes BladeRoom.

  • May 17, 2018

    Mass. Doctor's Kickback Convictions Are Fair, Judge Says

    A federal judge in Massachusetts published an order Thursday declining to overrule a jury's verdict that a gynecologist disclosed her patients’ medical information to a Warner Chilcott representative who used the data to target customers for expensive osteoporosis drugs.

  • May 17, 2018

    Transocean Wins $8.1M Attys' Fees In Eni Drill Ship Row

    A Texas federal judge on Wednesday awarded $8.1 million in attorneys’ fees to Transocean Offshore Deepwater Drilling Inc. in the wake of its win in a contract dispute with Eni US Operating Co. over a deep-water drilling rig ship, although Transocean wanted more.

  • May 17, 2018

    SQM Again Beats Calif. City's $30M Tainted Water Suit At Trial

    A California federal jury on Thursday rejected the city of Pomona's claim that mining company SQM's North American unit owes it $30 million to remedy groundwater contaminated by perchlorate allegedly originating from SQM fertilizer, handing SQM a second victory after the Ninth Circuit vacated a prior trial win.

  • May 17, 2018

    Online Ad Co. Looks To DQ Rival Counsel In Click Fraud Suit

    An internet ad placement company has asked a Texas federal judge to disqualify an attorney representing a rival in a $2.3 million suit over click fraud, saying the attorney had shared information the company designated as for outside attorneys' eyes only.

  • May 17, 2018

    Developer Convicted Of Running Malware Testing Service

    A federal jury has convicted a man living in Latvia of selling malware services that allowed hackers to probe U.S. businesses' cyber defenses before they launched attacks, software said to have led to hundreds of millions of dollars in damages to companies and consumers.

  • May 17, 2018

    Ex-Wilmington Trust Execs Convicted Of Fraud Want New Trial

    Four former Wilmington Trust Corp. executives convicted May 3 in Delaware on federal securities fraud and conspiracy charges for allegedly concealing bad commercial real estate loans from regulators and the public sought a new trial late Tuesday, arguing that prosecutors went outside the boundaries of the complaint.

  • May 17, 2018

    A Chat With Perkins Practice Management Chief Toby Brown

    In this monthly series, legal recruiters at Major Lindsey & Africa interview management from top law firms about navigating an increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Toby Brown, chief practice management officer at Perkins Coie LLP.

  • May 17, 2018

    GSK, Zofran Users To Pick 16 Potential MDL Bellwether Cases

    GlaxoSmithKline and the families who claim its anti-nausea medication Zofran caused various birth defects will each select eight cases to probe and possibly bring to trial in the multidistrict litigation’s final discovery phase, a Massachusetts federal judge ruled Thursday.

  • May 17, 2018

    Jury Awards Mother $4M For Baby's Whooping Cough Death

    A Lancaster County jury has awarded $4 million to a mother who blamed her daughter’s doctors for failing to diagnose the baby’s whooping cough, leading to her death at 32 days old.

Expert Analysis

  • Pleading A Personal Jurisdiction Defense Late In The Game

    James Beck

    Personal jurisdiction defenses are waivable and should be pleaded at the outset of litigation. Still, suppose a defendant, not recognizing the impacts of the Bauman and Bristol-Myers Squibb rulings, did not previously plead a personal jurisdiction defense, but now wants to do so. It’s not a good situation to be in, but it’s not hopeless, says James Beck of Reed Smith LLP.

  • Corporate Designee Practice Under NY V. Federal Rules

    Steve Kramer

    Your corporate client has been sued and it is a matter of time before a deposition notice is served. How to respond to the notice and plan for the deposition can depend upon whether the case is in federal or New York state court, with designation of subject matters being one of the greatest differences among the rules, says Steve Kramer of Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott LLC.

  • Another Take On 'Take-Home' Asbestos Exposure In Calif.

    Theresa Mullineaux

    A California appellate court recently upheld a trial court’s summary judgment in a secondary exposure asbestos case where the plaintiffs could offer no admissible evidence that the decedent’s father worked around asbestos-containing materials. While this opinion is unpublished and uncitable under California rules, its legal theory can apply to other cases, says Theresa Mullineaux of Husch Blackwell LLP.

  • Insurance Considerations For Mass-Shooting Litigation

    Monica Sullivan

    Mass-shooting litigation raises a number of unique concerns for civil defendants, and it has become increasingly critical for all interested stakeholders to understand the scope of potential coverage afforded by commercial general liability policies, as well as specialized insurance products, say Monica Sullivan and Matthew Novaria of Nicolaides Fink Thorpe Michaelides Sullivan LLP.

  • Rule 23 Changes: Avoid Delays In Class Settlement Approval

    Shandarese Garr

    Among the proposed amendments to Rule 23 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, which are scheduled to take effect Dec. 1, are specific requirements related to “front-loading.” They outline the process for seeking preliminary court approval of class action settlements and related notice plans, say Shandarese Garr and Niki Mendoza of Garden City Group LLC.

  • Trespass By Fracking: Pennsylvania Court Weighs In

    L. Poe Leggette

    Reversing a lower court's motion for summary judgment, the Superior Court of Pennsylvania recently held that trespass and conversion claims arising from a hydraulic fracturing operation are not precluded by the rule of capture. The case raises unsettling questions for oil and gas operators, say L. Poe Leggette and Jasper Mason of BakerHostetler.

  • Don't Misunderstand The Prop 65 Coffee Ruling

    Erika Schulz

    Press coverage of a recent high-profile Proposition 65 decision in California may prompt readers to conclude that coffee causes cancer; in fact, there was no such finding. But if the ruling stands, it could still have a big impact on coffee makers, so it is important for both consumers and companies to understand it fully, say attorneys with DLA Piper.

  • Best Practices For Building A Better Meeting

    Nicholas Cheolas

    How can we improve meetings in the legal industry, which tends to evolve with the speed of a tranquilized water buffalo mired in quicksand? Breaking it down to three phases can yield significant benefits, says Nicholas Cheolas of Zelle LLP.

  • 5 Ways Law Firms Are Becoming More Like Hotels

    Bella Schiro

    One way law firms differentiate themselves from the competition to attract and retain top talent is through their real estate and workplace strategies. Taking a lead from the hospitality industry can help create a more inviting, welcoming and collaborative workspace environment, says Bella Schiro of Jones Lang LaSalle Inc.

  • How CPSC Late Reporting Penalty Trends Are Evolving

    Eric Rubel

    Dollar amounts of U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission prelitigation settlements have increased over the past five years, as most recently shown by a record settlement with Polaris Industries for alleged reporting violations related to three recalls. But this track record has not been matched in recently litigated cases, say attorneys with Arnold & Porter.