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Trials

  • August 9, 2018

    'Man-Purse And Some TLC' Sweetened $60K Bribe, Jury Told

    A key prosecution witness in the $20 million cash-for-investment bribery case against former union boss Norman Seabrook told a Manhattan jury Thursday that a designer man-purse and some friendly treatment soothed the defendant when he learned of his less-than-expected $60,000 alleged payout.

  • August 9, 2018

    Martoma Asks Full 2nd Circ. To Fix Insider Trading Rift

    Former SAC Capital Advisors LP manager Mathew Martoma asked the full Second Circuit to reconsider his insider trading appeal Wednesday, saying a recent split decision ignored U.S. Supreme Court rulings that passing tips to others is a crime only when the insider benefits.

  • August 9, 2018

    Manafort Judge Says His Dressing-Down Of Feds Was Wrong

    The case against Paul Manafort focused Thursday on allegations that he tricked banks into more favorable loans, but it kicked off with a mea culpa from the Virginia federal judge admitting he may have made a mistake. 

  • August 9, 2018

    Ugg Maker's Patent Upheld After $5.2M Jury Win

    A California federal judge issued a findings of fact order that favored Ugg maker Deckers Outdoor Corp. following a $5.2 million verdict that held Romeo and Juliette Inc. liable for infringing two design patents.

  • August 9, 2018

    Del. Judge Not Inclined To Reverse $82M IBM Patent Wins

    A federal judge in Delaware said he is inclined to stand pat on most of the jury verdicts and rulings that produced an $82.5 million award in late July against Groupon Inc. for infringing four early, e-commerce-related IBM Corp. patents.

  • August 9, 2018

    J&J Hip Implant Plaintiffs Seek $246M Judgment After Trial

    A group of New York plaintiffs that sued Johnson & Johnson and its orthopedics unit over allegedly defective hip implants has asked a Texas federal court for a nearly $246 million judgment in the bellwether case after a jury found the company liable for the defects and fraud.

  • August 9, 2018

    Ex-Pa. Rep. Fattah Wins Bribery Conviction Appeal

    The Third Circuit agreed on Thursday that the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent redefinition of federal bribery law meant that Ex-Rep. Chaka Fattah, D-Pa., should be retried on charges including allegations that he accepted gifts from a friend in exchange for attempting to secure him an ambassadorship.

  • August 8, 2018

    Nevada Let Controlled Burn Turn Into Wildfire, Jury Told

    Counsel for property owners impacted by 2016’s Little Valley Fire told a Nevada jury during Wednesday opening statements that it was the Nevada Division of Forestry’s decision to ignore its own plan and abandon a prescribed burn during high winds, causing the devastating wildfire.

  • August 8, 2018

    Manafort Wouldn't Have Noticed Embezzled Cash, Gates Says

    A prosecutor worked Wednesday to shore up cooperator Rick Gates' testimony against former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort in the face of attacks on Gates' credibility, in part by asserting to a Virginia federal jury that Manafort wouldn't have noticed that his business partner was skimming from their lobbying firm's revenue.

  • August 8, 2018

    Bowles Rice, Title Insurer Set For Trial In $41M Contract Row

    Bowles Rice LLP is headed to trial against a longtime partner, title insurer First American, after a federal court ruled Wednesday enough facts remain disputed about the law firm's share of blame around a $41 million settlement following the rocky construction of a coal power plant, whose title First American insured.

  • August 8, 2018

    Judge Slashes Jury Award By $2M After Victim's Father Dies

    A California federal judge on Wednesday trimmed $2 million from a jury’s $6.5 million wrongful death award in a suit that accused a Sacramento County sheriff’s deputy of fatally shooting an unarmed schizophrenic man, saying the death of the man’s father during trial warranted the reduction.

  • August 8, 2018

    Judge Slashes $15M From Pelvic Mesh Verdict Against J&J

    An Indiana federal judge Wednesday conditionally reduced a $35 million verdict against a Johnson & Johnson unit awarded to a woman who was found to have been harmed by a pelvic mesh device — saying if she didn’t accept a $15 million reduction she’d face a new trial on punitive damages.

  • August 8, 2018

    Manatt Asks Calif. Court To Toss Recruiter's $335K Trial Win

    Manatt Phelps & Phillips LLP urged a California appeals court Wednesday to find it doesn’t owe a legal recruiter $335,000 for connecting the firm with its now managing partner-elect, arguing a jury found the recruiter didn’t fulfill his deal with Manatt and there was no evidence that was the firm’s fault.

  • August 8, 2018

    Colo. HVAC Co. Hit With $1.7M Verdict Over Lack Of Permits

    A Colorado jury has rendered a $1.7 million verdict against Mile High Heating & Cooling, its owner and its manager after finding the company installed approximately 1,000 furnaces without obtaining building permits, the state attorney general said Wednesday.

  • August 8, 2018

    'Outercourse' Claim Fails In Stanford Sex Assault Appeal

    A California appellate court rejected a former Stanford University swimmer’s argument that his previous conviction for sexual assault with intent to commit rape should be overturned because he was only engaging in “outercourse,” ruling Wednesday that there was plenty of evidence that he had more than just “dry-humping” in mind.

  • August 8, 2018

    Jones Day Lands An IP Pro From Paul Hastings

    Jones Day has grabbed a “first chair litigator” in Silicon Valley from Paul Hastings LLP with nearly 20 years of experience in patent and technology work, the firm announced Monday.

  • August 8, 2018

    Arctic Cat, Bombardier Can’t Redo Snowmobile Patent Trial

    Bombardier and Arctic Cat each lost bids for a new trial in a snowmobile patent dispute when a Minnesota federal judge ruled Tuesday that there was sufficient evidence supporting a jury’s finding that Arctic Cat infringed one of Bombardier’s patents, and that the contested claims in two patents were invalid.

  • August 8, 2018

    Bribery Trial Judge Asks How $60K Cash Fits In 'Man-Purse'

    The Manhattan federal judge overseeing the bribery trial of former union boss Norman Seabrook was curious Wednesday about the $60,000 allegedly paid to Seabrook in exchange for a hedge fund investment, pressing a key witness on how that much cash could have been stuffed in a small-sized “man-purse.”

  • August 8, 2018

    J&J Urges Pa. Appeals Court To Undo $2.5M Risperdal Verdict

    A Johnson & Johnson unit pushed a Pennsylvania appeals court on Wednesday to jettison a $2.5 million verdict on grounds that a trial judge improperly barred it from using a scientific article to challenge an expert’s opinion that the antipsychotic drug Risperdal caused an adolescent boy to grow breasts.

  • August 8, 2018

    Hospital Says Past Deal Might Trim $6.3M Med Mal Award

    A hospital that owes $6.3 million to the New Zealand Olympic snowboard team's former coach following a medical malpractice trial asked a Colorado federal judge to look at the terms of a confidential settlement the man previously reached with doctors, saying state law prohibits double recoveries.

Expert Analysis

  • Guest Feature

    Chris Dodd Talks Dodd-Frank, Nuremberg Trial, Hollywood

    Randy Maniloff

    Attorney Randy Maniloff recently sat down with former Sen. Christopher Dodd at his new office at Arnold & Porter in Washington, D.C. The goal? To discover things we might not know about the author of some of the most important legislation of the last few decades.

  • A Lawyer's Guide To Genomics In Toxic Tort Cases: Part 2

    Kirk Hartley

    The use of genetic testing in tort litigation is relatively new. Such testing may uncover one or more gene variants that help identify individuals at an increased risk of developing a disease. Whole genome sequencing can be the best and most appropriate approach for toxic tort civil litigation, say Kirk Hartley and David Schwartz of ToxicoGenomica.

  • What Kavanaugh's Writing Tells Us About His Personality

    Matthew Hall

    People with certain personality traits tend to use certain words. A computer analysis of Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s D.C. Circuit opinions reveals that he is highly extraverted, which means that he would be a prominent voice on the U.S. Supreme Court, says Matthew Hall, a professor at the University of Notre Dame.

  • Opinion

    3 Pros, 3 Cons Of Litigation Finance

    Ralph Sutton

    An educated guess puts the number of new litigation funders launched in the past 18 months at 30 — an astonishing number, with more to come. Is this a blessing to our legal system or something more akin to tulip mania? Maybe both, says Ralph Sutton, founder and CEO of litigation funding firm Validity Finance LLC.

  • A Lawyer's Guide To Genomics In Toxic Tort Cases: Part 1

    Kirk Hartley

    Genomic data and technologies can assist both plaintiffs and defendants in toxic tort and personal injury cases in uncovering the underlying causes of disease. In coming years, the influence of genomics in civil law will be even broader than its influence in criminal law, say attorney Kirk Hartley and scientific consultant David Schwartz of ToxicoGenomica.

  • AT&T Win May Help Partial Ownership Transactions

    Jon Dubrow

    While U.S. District Judge Richard Leon was careful to note that his opinion in the AT&T-Timer Warner merger trial was narrow, his evaluation of the evidence undercut the government's theoretical economic model in a way that may have broader applications, says John Dubrow of McDermott Will & Emery LLP.

  • Online Pharmaceuticals – But Not Much Online Liability

    James Beck

    Online sales platforms are allowing a plethora of over-the-counter medications to be sold by a myriad of manufacturers. This can lead to situations where product liability plaintiffs are left with nobody to sue. It is not surprising to see plaintiffs attempt to sue online marketplaces; but for, now the law is not letting them get away with it, says James Beck of Reed Smith LLP.

  • Modern Communication Brings E-Discovery Challenges

    Thomas Bonk

    As new communications platforms displace email, the legal industry is awkwardly grappling with complex e-discovery questions. Fortunately, this environment provides a very fertile ground of incentives for innovation in both e-discovery technology and service offerings, says Thomas Bonk of Epiq.

  • Opinion

    It's Not All About The Benjamins, Baby (Lawyer)

    J.B. Heaton

    Notwithstanding the latest salary war among prominent law firms, I urge my middle-aged and older colleagues to help the recent graduates we know focus on the long term. Even if the salary is the same, there is a big difference between an institutional firm and the relatively younger firms matching BigLaw, says J.B. Heaton, a University of Chicago business law fellow and former partner at Bartlit Beck.

  • Fewer Remedies In Calif. For Targets Of Defamatory Reviews

    Pooja Nair

    Earlier this month, the California Supreme Court ruled in Hassell v. Bird that Yelp could not be ordered to remove negative reviews of a law firm that were found to be defamatory. While the decision is a victory for internet platforms and websites, the scope of immunity under the Communications Decency Act has not been fully drawn out, says Pooja Nair of TroyGould PC.