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Trials

  • September 24, 2018

    Ex-Akebia Analyst Jailed For Ignoring Probation Calls

    A former biostatistician at Akebia Therapeutics Inc. will await sentencing for an insider trading conviction from behind bars after a fed-up Massachusetts federal judge ordered him jailed Monday for ignoring repeated calls from probation, even as he frequently chatted with his co-conspirator.

  • September 24, 2018

    VirnetX Says $93M Added To $503M Verdict In Apple IP Row

    VirnetX and Apple Inc. have agreed to tack on roughly $93 million in interest and costs to the $502.6 million award VirnetX won after a Texas federal jury found that Apple willfully infringed four of the licensing company’s patents, according to an announcement Monday.

  • September 24, 2018

    Cosby Owes Quarter-Million In Fees, Schnader Harrison Says

    As a sentencing hearing in Pennsylvania court for Bill Cosby kicked off on Monday in the wake of his sexual assault conviction, the disgraced entertainer faces another legal challenge as his onetime attorneys with Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis LLP pursue what they say are more than a quarter-million dollars in unpaid legal fees.

  • September 24, 2018

    Jury Deadlocks In J&J Trial Over Talc-Asbestos Claim

    A California jury’s members on Monday said that after a week’s deliberation they still can't decide if Johnson & Johnson’s talcum powder products caused a woman's mesothelioma, prompting a mistrial in the latest case over the alleged link between J&J's talc products and asbestos.

  • September 21, 2018

    Jury Finds Overstock.Com Guilty Of $3M Escheat Holdback

    A Delaware jury took little more than a hour to find Overstock.com guilty of concealing nearly $3 million in abandoned gift card balances from Delaware’s revenue agency, after a six-day whistleblower trial that could lead to a treble damages sanction.

  • September 21, 2018

    Jury Awards $9.1M In Cyclist's Crash Suit Against LA, Caltrans

    A California jury on Thursday awarded $9.1 million in a suit accusing the city of Los Angeles and Caltrans of failing to properly maintain a section of a Southern California coastline highway, causing a cyclist’s crash that resulted in significant brain damage.

  • September 21, 2018

    Judge Probes NCAA VP On Athlete Pay Rules At Trial

    A California federal judge on Friday repeatedly questioned an NCAA vice president on the specifics of its pay rules during a landmark antitrust trial over the association's limits on student compensation, pointing to apparent discrepancies between financial aid limits the NCAA has imposed on its various conferences.

  • September 21, 2018

    Ex-Platinum Partners Exec Dies Ahead Of $1B Fraud Trial

    Former Platinum Partners honcho Uri Landesman, charged for his role in a purported $1 billion securities fraud scheme, died, his lawyer said Friday, ahead of a January trial of hedge fund executives accused of duping bondholders of defunct offshore driller Black Elk.

  • September 21, 2018

    USPTO Disputes Order To Issue Patents In Stalled Apps Case

    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has urged a judge to stay an order directing it to issue patents to an inventor claiming his applications have been improperly stalled, arguing the court has no authority to make that order, while the inventor says the court clearly has the power.

  • September 21, 2018

    Fracking Co. Wins $1M In Contract Row With Gas Wells Owner

    A Pennsylvania federal jury on Thursday awarded fracking services company Stingray $1.65 million in damages for gas well owner EQT Production's breach of contract, although the jury found that both companies breached their arrangement and also awarded EQT $676,250 from Stingray.

  • September 21, 2018

    Texas Court Affirms Defense Verdict In Botched Surgery Suit

    A Texas appellate panel on Thursday affirmed a jury’s decision to clear a doctor in a suit accusing him of botching a woman’s hysterectomy and causing serious injuries, rejecting the woman’s argument that the trial judge erred by refusing to strike two potential jurors.

  • September 21, 2018

    Cadwalader Asks For Court's Help With Settlement Talks

    A week before trial is scheduled to begin, Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft told a New York state court on Friday that there is still the potential to settle a legal malpractice suit brought by Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder but that the court must step in to ensure decision makers will be at the table.

  • September 21, 2018

    Fitness Device Co. Seeks Treble Damages In $6.8M IP Row

    The company behind TRX exercise equipment Thursday told a California federal court it should get treble damages on a 2017 $6.8 million patent and trademark infringement verdict against Woss Enterprises LLC, saying Woss continues to sell infringing products.

  • September 20, 2018

    Fla. Justices Restore Bad Faith Finding Against Geico

    A sharply divided Florida Supreme Court on Thursday reinstated a jury's $9.2 million verdict against Geico for bad faith in the insurer's handling of a claim against a policyholder for a deadly car crash, in a decision that could have a significant effect on insurance cases in the state.

  • September 20, 2018

    7th Circ. Will Not Rehear Suit Against GSK Over Atty's Suicide

    The Seventh Circuit on Thursday refused to reconsider its decision to overturn a $3 million verdict blaming GlaxoSmithKline for the suicide of a Reed Smith partner who had been taking a generic version of its Paxil drug.

  • September 20, 2018

    OSU Exec Defends Amateurism Amid Coach Salary Scrutiny

    Ohio State University athletic director Eugene Smith defended NCAA rules limiting student compensation during a landmark antitrust trial Thursday in California federal court, testifying that paying athletes would force the department to cut certain sports, while conceding that the school's coaches collectively earn more than $30 million in salaries and benefits annually.

  • September 20, 2018

    Houston Pill Mill Doc, Clinic Chief Each Get 35 Years In Prison

    A Houston doctor and the owner of the pain management clinic where she worked were each sentenced to 35 years in prison by a federal judge in Texas on Thursday for their roles in running what prosecutors called the “most prolific hydrocodone pill mill in Houston.”

  • September 20, 2018

    Fed. Circ. Revises Axing Of $140M Fairchild IP Verdict

    The Federal Circuit on Thursday made a handful of modifications to a July panel decision that vacated a $140 million jury verdict against Fairchild Semiconductor in a chip patent case brought by Power Integrations but declined to rehear the case as a full court.

  • September 20, 2018

    Florida High Court Reinstates $20M Tobacco Verdict

    The Florida Supreme Court on Thursday reinstated a $20 million tobacco jury verdict in favor of the daughter of a lifelong smoker, ruling that the state appeals court that overturned it imposed an improper cap on damages awards for adult children of smoking victims in wrongful death suits.

  • September 20, 2018

    Ice Miller Adds Bankruptcy Pro From Wollmuth Maher

    Ice Miller LLP has brought in bankruptcy specialist John Giampolo to join the firm as a partner in its bankruptcy litigation group out of New York City.

Expert Analysis

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: A Flood Of MDLs

    Alan Rothman

    At its most recent meeting, the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation considered and denied a petition for an MDL proceeding to centralize flood insurance claims arising from recent hurricanes. The decision shows the careful line the panel must walk when considering petitions featuring cases with a variety of circumstances, says Alan Rothman of Arnold & Porter.

  • Opinion

    Law360's Global 20 Doesn't Acknowledge Global Networks

    Glenn Cunningham

    While I read with interest Law360's report analyzing the top 20 global law firms of 2018, I also noticed it doesn't tell the whole story. Global networks of independent law firms compare favorably with multinational firms in terms of geographic coverage, legal expertise, and awareness of local cultures and customs, says Glenn Cunningham of Interlaw Ltd.

  • The Millennial Juror’s Thoughts On IP

    Johanna Carrane

    Millennials represent more than 25 percent of the U.S. population and grew up immersed in technology. Anyone preparing to face a patent jury should consider how this age group feels about the patent world. Our analysis of 5,000 mock jurors showed two important overall conclusions, say Johanna Carrane and Lynn Fahey of JuryScope Inc.

  • Takeaways From 5th Circ. Wind Farm Scam Case

    Kip Mendrygal

    The misappropriation of funds charge can leave defense attorneys struggling throughout trial to distinguish personal expenses from legitimate business expenses. The Fifth Circuit's decision in U.S. v. Spalding sheds light on how to handle these situations, but also sets out the battles that attorneys won’t win, say Kip Mendrygal and Mario Nguyen of Locke Lord LLP.

  • The Opioid Epidemic: Who Will Jurors Hold Accountable?

    Christina Marinakis

    Hardly a day goes by where we don’t hear about another lawsuit being filed accusing pharmaceutical companies, distributors, hospitals and pharmacies of fueling the country’s addiction to opioids. But without any of these cases reaching a jury to date, it can be difficult to predict how jurors will react to these claims, says Christina Marinakis of Litigation Insights.

  • A Lawyer's Guide To Genomics In Toxic Tort Cases: Part 3

    Kirk Hartley

    Genetic data and techniques are becoming ever more powerful tools for explaining when and how diseases arise. They can also have very strong evidentiary value, and in some toxic tort cases, genetic findings can provide conclusive answers for a judge or jury, say Kirk Hartley and David Schwartz of ToxicoGenomica.

  • Guest Feature

    Chris Dodd Talks Dodd-Frank, Nuremberg Trial, Hollywood

    Randy Maniloff

    Attorney Randy Maniloff recently sat down with former Sen. Christopher Dodd at his new office at Arnold & Porter in Washington, D.C. The goal? To discover things we might not know about the author of some of the most important legislation of the last few decades.

  • A Lawyer's Guide To Genomics In Toxic Tort Cases: Part 2

    Kirk Hartley

    The use of genetic testing in tort litigation is relatively new. Such testing may uncover one or more gene variants that help identify individuals at an increased risk of developing a disease. Whole genome sequencing can be the best and most appropriate approach for toxic tort civil litigation, say Kirk Hartley and David Schwartz of ToxicoGenomica.

  • What Kavanaugh's Writing Tells Us About His Personality

    Matthew Hall

    People with certain personality traits tend to use certain words. A computer analysis of Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s D.C. Circuit opinions reveals that he is highly extraverted, which means that he would be a prominent voice on the U.S. Supreme Court, says Matthew Hall, a professor at the University of Notre Dame.

  • Opinion

    3 Pros, 3 Cons Of Litigation Finance

    Ralph Sutton

    An educated guess puts the number of new litigation funders launched in the past 18 months at 30 — an astonishing number, with more to come. Is this a blessing to our legal system or something more akin to tulip mania? Maybe both, says Ralph Sutton, founder and CEO of litigation funding firm Validity Finance LLC.