Trials

  • May 18, 2018

    Fate Of Apple's $1B IP Fight With Samsung In Jury's Hands

    Following closing arguments Friday, the five women and three men of a California federal jury filed out of a San Jose courthouse for a weekend break with a billion-dollar question hanging in the air: How much in damages must Samsung pay Apple for infringing its smartphone design and utility patents?

  • May 18, 2018

    EEOC Loses Trial Over Rent-A-Center Firing Of Trans Worker

    An Illinois federal jury found Friday that Rent-A-Center East Inc. didn’t illegally fire a transgender employee after she told the company she was transitioning, dealing a loss to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and its argument that the termination flouted federal anti-discrimination law.

  • May 18, 2018

    Axis Win In $2M Truck Crash Coverage Row Upheld In 5th Circ.

    The Fifth Circuit on Friday found Hartford Insurance Co. owes $2 million in coverage for a Louisiana truck accident, rejecting its argument that the wording of the policy limits the kind of vehicles covered.

  • May 18, 2018

    Houston Jury Awards $90M To Family In Trucking Death Case

    A Texas state court jury has hit Werner Enterprises Inc. with a nearly $90 million verdict, finding the trucking company responsible for a 2014 collision that killed a 7-year-old and paralyzed a 12-year-old, attorneys for the family said Friday.

  • May 18, 2018

    Skeloses Get Docs That Could Undermine Developer Witness

    A federal judge ordered a Manhattan developer's general counsel to hand over documents on Thursday that she said could “undermine” testimony expected at the upcoming corruption retrial of New York State Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos and his son Adam.

  • May 18, 2018

    Fed. Circ. Revives $5.4M IP Verdict Nixed By Wis. Judge

    The Federal Circuit revived a $5.4 million verdict against a manufacturer of captioned phones that a Wisconsin federal jury found infringed the asserted claims of a patent covering the devices, holding Friday that a judge erred in tossing the jury’s determination that the patent was valid.

  • May 18, 2018

    Feds Double Down On Union Boss' Graft Retrial

    Manhattan federal prosecutors on Thursday beefed up their case against New York City labor boss Norman Seabrook with a new fraud charge, ahead of a coming retrial over accusations that he took bribes from Platinum Partners in exchange for his union’s investment in the hedge fund.

  • May 18, 2018

    Ala. Justices Nix $10M Med Mal Award For Blind, Deaf Baby

    The Alabama Supreme Court on Friday vacated a $10 million award in a suit accusing a hospital of causing a baby's blindness, deafness and seizure disorder due to a meningitis misdiagnosis, saying a trial judge's improper admission of evidence warrants a new trial.

  • May 17, 2018

    $9.7M Valeant Payment Was Legal, Ex-Execs Argue In Closing

    Prosecutors and two health care businessmen charged with defrauding Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc. out of $9.7 million when it moved to buy mail-order pharmacy Philidor Rx Services LLC made their closing arguments to a Manhattan federal jury on Thursday, advancing competing views of whether Valeant was a victim or a beneficiary of Philidor’s rise.

  • May 17, 2018

    Judge Probes Quinn Attys On 'Games' In Apple-Samsung Trial

    U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh on Thursday ordered Quinn Emanuel attorneys representing Samsung to provide the flight itinerary and boarding pass of a witness they suddenly dropped after Apple rested its case in a billion-dollar California patent damages trial, saying she wants to see if they're "playing games." A trial between Apple and Samsung played out all week in a San Jose courtroom, closing Friday. Here's one of our top-read stories on the proceedings from this week.

  • May 17, 2018

    LA Jury Awards $6.3M To Pedestrian Hit By Tour Bus

    A Los Angeles jury awarded $6.3 million on Wednesday to a woman who was hit by a turning tour bus as she crossed the street at a crosswalk, according to the plaintiff's counsel.

  • May 17, 2018

    Emerson Seeks Peek At Facebook Deal In $30M IP Theft Suit

    Emerson Electric told a skeptical California federal judge Thursday it wants former co-defendant Facebook to disclose its confidential deal to exit BladeRoom Group Ltd.’s trade secret suit, saying any financial settlement could offset the $30 million a jury said it owes BladeRoom.

  • May 17, 2018

    Mass. Doctor's Kickback Convictions Are Fair, Judge Says

    A federal judge in Massachusetts published an order Thursday declining to overrule a jury's verdict that a gynecologist disclosed her patients’ medical information to a Warner Chilcott representative who used the data to target customers for expensive osteoporosis drugs.

  • May 17, 2018

    Transocean Wins $8.1M Attys' Fees In Eni Drill Ship Row

    A Texas federal judge on Wednesday awarded $8.1 million in attorneys’ fees to Transocean Offshore Deepwater Drilling Inc. in the wake of its win in a contract dispute with Eni US Operating Co. over a deep-water drilling rig ship, although Transocean wanted more.

  • May 17, 2018

    SQM Again Beats Calif. City's $30M Tainted Water Suit At Trial

    A California federal jury on Thursday rejected the city of Pomona's claim that mining company SQM's North American unit owes it $30 million to remedy groundwater contaminated by perchlorate allegedly originating from SQM fertilizer, handing SQM a second victory after the Ninth Circuit vacated a prior trial win.

  • May 17, 2018

    Online Ad Co. Looks To DQ Rival Counsel In Click Fraud Suit

    An internet ad placement company has asked a Texas federal judge to disqualify an attorney representing a rival in a $2.3 million suit over click fraud, saying the attorney had shared information the company designated as for outside attorneys' eyes only.

  • May 17, 2018

    Developer Convicted Of Running Malware Testing Service

    A federal jury has convicted a man living in Latvia of selling malware services that allowed hackers to probe U.S. businesses' cyber defenses before they launched attacks, software said to have led to hundreds of millions of dollars in damages to companies and consumers.

  • May 17, 2018

    Ex-Wilmington Trust Execs Convicted Of Fraud Want New Trial

    Four former Wilmington Trust Corp. executives convicted May 3 in Delaware on federal securities fraud and conspiracy charges for allegedly concealing bad commercial real estate loans from regulators and the public sought a new trial late Tuesday, arguing that prosecutors went outside the boundaries of the complaint.

  • May 17, 2018

    A Chat With Perkins Practice Management Chief Toby Brown

    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts at Major Lindsey & Africa interview management from top law firms about navigating an increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Toby Brown, chief practice management officer at Perkins Coie LLP.

  • May 17, 2018

    GSK, Zofran Users To Pick 16 Potential MDL Bellwether Cases

    GlaxoSmithKline and the families who claim its anti-nausea medication Zofran caused various birth defects will each select eight cases to probe and possibly bring to trial in the multidistrict litigation’s final discovery phase, a Massachusetts federal judge ruled Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • How Vehicle Logging Devices May Fuel 'Reptile Tactics'

    Jennifer Parrott

    Many motor carriers are now required to equip their commercial vehicles with electronic logging devices. The vast amount of data these devices record will make it much easier for plaintiffs lawyers to pinpoint specific safety issues caused by motor carriers or drivers, and use such issues to appeal to juries, say Jennifer Parrott and Melody Kiella of Drew Eckl & Farnham LLP.

  • Opinion

    Why Won't Judicial Nominees Affirm Brown V. Board Of Ed?

    Franita Tolson

    On May 17, 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court decided Brown v. Board of Education, recognizing a moral and legal truth that should be beyond question in American society. The refusal by some of President Donald Trump's judicial nominees to say whether they believe the case was decided correctly is indicative of the narrow-minded elitism they would bring to the bench, says professor Franita Tolson of the University of Southern California's Gould School of Law.

  • The Lawyers' Guide To Cloud Computing

    Daniel Garrie

    In deciding whether cloud computing is right for the organization or firm, an attorney must consider cloud computing’s significant impact on the electronic discovery process, say Daniel Garrie, managing partner at Law & Forensics LLC, and David Cass, chief information security officer at IBM Cloud.

  • The Principal Purpose Test — A US Tax Court Preview

    Rusudan Shervashidze

    The IRS argument in a case pending before the U.S. Tax Court was similar to the principal purpose tests laid out by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the European Commission. To that extent, European and Canadian tax advisers who face application of a principal purpose test under domestic law or a tax treaty should take note of the court's ruling, say Rusudan Shervashidze and Stanley Ruchelman of Ruchelman PLLC.

  • Opinion

    Recovering Lawyers' Lost Position Of Independence

    Samuel Samaro

    In these politically divisive times, many ask whether our institutions and traditions can help us return to a greater consensus. In days long past, the legal profession could have been counted on to serve just such a function. But lawyers are now just as polarized as everyone else, says Samuel Samaro of Pashman Stein Walder Hayden PC.

  • Employee Promotion Lessons From Hussain V. FedEx

    Jill Vorobiev

    While Federal Express succeeded at summary judgment and juries twice found in its favor in Hussain v. FedEx, the path to its recent victory was a long and likely costly one. Employers seeking to mitigate the risk of similar promotion-related discrimination claims should bear in mind the factors that led the Seventh Circuit to reverse the district court's summary judgment, say Jill Vorobiev and Adam Weiner of Reed Smith LLP.

  • The Future Of Design Patent Remedies Is Unclear

    Derek Dahlgren

    The Apple v. Samsung design-patent retrial — scheduled to begin on Monday — is an opportunity to clear up confusion on remedies. However, the complicated test that will be used for determining the article of manufacture presents the risk of creating more confusion, say Derek Dahlgren and Spencer Johnson of Rothwell Figg Ernst & Manbeck PC.

  • 8 Reasons To Take A Fresh Look At Your Law Office Lease

    Tiffany Winne

    After moving into a new law office, tenants often file their signed leases away, figuring that the terms are set for a few years at least. However, leases can be very flexible instruments, and should be reviewed annually even if nothing seems amiss, says Tiffany Winne of Savills Studley Inc.

  • A General Counsel's Tips For Succeeding As A New Associate

    Jason Idilbi

    Based on his experience as a BigLaw associate for six years and now as general counsel for a tech startup, Jason Idilbi of Passport Labs offers some best practices for newer associates — whether they are serving external clients or senior attorneys within their firms.

  • 4 Views On Snap Removal Expressed By Illinois Courts

    Amy Rubenstein.jpg

    As courts increasingly rely on electronic docket monitoring systems, they have reached inconsistent outcomes on whether a defendant can "snap remove" a case to federal court. The various approaches taken by Illinois courts show that defendants must weigh the risk that removal will fail against the time and expense involved in removal, say Amy Rubenstein and Mary Shepro of DLA Piper.