Trials

  • December 14, 2017

    FIFA Trial Wraps In Blitz Of Denials And Recriminations

    The trial of three former South American soccer officials wrapped Thursday as the prosecution argued its trove of secret recordings, unearthed ledgers and wire transfer records clearly established the men’s roles in long-running bribery schemes, while the defense accused the prosecution of overplaying its hand after the government’s wide-ranging corruption inquiry into international soccer.

  • December 14, 2017

    Rejecting Insanity Defense, Jury Convicts Doctor Of Fraud

    A California federal jury on Thursday convicted a family physician on five counts of health care fraud and five counts of making false statements to insurers, rejecting her defense that billing issues were caused by a mental illness while rejecting the government’s conspiracy and money laundering charges.

  • December 14, 2017

    Texas Jury Partly Clears Ex-Servergy CEO At SEC Trial

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission scored a narrow trial victory this week when a Texas federal jury found a former technology executive liable for a single count of negligence but cleared him of several more serious claims lodged by the Wall Street regulator over the alleged way he promoted investments in his company, Servergy Inc.

  • December 14, 2017

    Gov't Misconduct Claims Blocked From Ex-Katten Atty Trial

    A Brooklyn federal judge on Thursday refused to allow allegations of government misconduct to be heard by jurors in the fraud trial of former Katten Muchin attorney Evan Greebel, after revealing that a witness claims a prosecutor told him to change his story, drop his legal action against Retrophin Inc. and pay the pharmaceutical company $170,000.

  • December 14, 2017

    Ex-Cuomo Aide Pleads Not Guilty In Bribery Case

    A former aide of New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and three others pled not guilty on Wednesday to an expanded indictment tied to alleged bribes for higher education and energy projects, ahead of a trial set for January.

  • December 14, 2017

    Jury Sides With Fla. Car Wash Cos. In Worker's Wage Suit

    Two affiliated Florida car wash companies on Tuesday beat a Fair Labor Standards Act collective action when a Florida federal jury ruled that they had correctly used tips to supplement the hourly wages of the former employee who brought the suit.

  • December 14, 2017

    Xarelto Bellwether Loser's New Trial Bid Rejected By Judge

    A Louisiana federal judge on Thursday refused to grant a new trial to a woman who lost a bellwether trial on claims that Janssen Pharmaceuticals’ and Bayer’s blood thinner Xarelto causes internal bleeding, rejecting her contention that a recent scientific study could have changed the jury's mind.

  • December 14, 2017

    Texas Jury Hits BBVA Compass With $98M Fraud Verdict

    A Dallas County jury on Wednesday slammed BBVA Compass bank with a $98 million verdict, finding in favor of a developer who alleged that the bank committed fraud while the parties were engaged in loan renewal negotiations stemming from the development of three subdivisions in Tarrant County, Texas.

  • December 14, 2017

    Stanford Receiver Can't Renew Fight Over $88M Clawback

    A Texas federal judge on Thursday denied a request by the court-appointed receiver of Stanford International Bank to overturn a jury decision keeping $88 million in cash in the hands of a cable and truck-racing magnate, who received it shortly before Stanford's Ponzi scheme-related collapse.

  • December 14, 2017

    Turkish Banker Gets To Sleep On Decision To Take Stand

    Mehmet Hakan Atilla, the Turkish banker accused of helping Iran evade billions of dollars of U.S. sanctions, stood up to take the stand on his own behalf Thursday before a close to the trial day afforded him the opportunity to sleep on his decision.

  • December 14, 2017

    Ex-Deutsche Traders' Libor Trial Delayed By Taint Inquiry

    A frustrated Manhattan federal judge on Thursday pushed the criminal trial of two former Deutsche Bank traders from early to mid-2018, making more time to examine whether the London Interbank Offered Rate rigging case was tainted by testimony compelled in the U.K.

  • December 14, 2017

    J&J Unit Hit With $15M Pelvic Mesh Verdict In NJ

    A New Jersey state jury on Thursday slammed Johnson & Johnson unit Ethicon with $15 million in damages over claims the company lied about the safety of a pelvic mesh product that caused a woman debilitating pain.

  • December 14, 2017

    Meningitis Fraudster Says Feds' Push For $133M Must Wait

    A pharmacist convicted of fraud for selling deadly drugs in the 2012 fungal meningitis outbreak urged a Massachusetts federal court Wednesday to uphold its decision not to award the federal government $132.8 million in restitution while he appeals his case to the First Circuit.

  • December 13, 2017

    FIFA Trial Catalogs Broken Loyalties And Shifting Alliances

    As the trial of three South American soccer officials accused of agreeing to take millions in bribes from sports marketing companies began to wind down Wednesday, both prosecutors and defense attorneys attested to the culture of graft fostered over years by gatekeepers of the sport.

  • December 13, 2017

    Jury Urged To Punish J&J With Pelvic Mesh Trial Verdict

    Counsel for a woman alleging she’s been severely hurt by a pelvic mesh product made by Johnson & Johnson unit Ethicon urged a New Jersey jury Wednesday to punish J&J with damages, saying the company had lied about the safety of its product.

  • December 13, 2017

    Quinn Emanuel Hires Boies Schiller Litigator In NYC

    Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP on Wednesday announced it had hired a commercial litigator from Boies Schiller Flexner LLP who has handled several headline-grabbing cases in the art world.

  • December 13, 2017

    2nd Circ. Axes Pharma Exec's Fraud Convictions

    The Second Circuit on Wednesday vaporized a pharmaceutical executive’s felony convictions for importing and selling unapproved prescription drugs, saying a judge improperly blocked testimony about legal advice that purportedly greenlighted the sales.

  • December 13, 2017

    Ga. Contractors Get 8 Years For Defrauding CDC

    A Georgia federal judge has sentenced the owners of a Georgia-based company that supplied drywall workers for construction projects to eight years each in prison for misrepresenting to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that they had in fact withheld taxes from all workers, the U.S. Department of Justice said Wednesday.

  • December 13, 2017

    RJ Reynolds, Philip Morris Nab New Trials In Fla. Suits

    A Florida appeals court Wednesday reversed nearly $47 million in damages awards against R.J. Reynolds and Philip Morris and ordered new trials in two Engle progeny suits against the tobacco companies.

  • December 13, 2017

    Ex-Katten Atty Trial Halted Over 'Career-Ending' Claims

    The Martin Shkreli-linked fraud trial of former Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP attorney Evan Greebel came to a screeching halt Wednesday, over unidentified “potentially career-ending” claims raised by Greebel's lawyers involving an unnamed government official.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: An Update From The DOJ

    Daniel Kahn

    U.S. Department of Justice prosecutors and law enforcement partners have secured more foreign bribery-related trial convictions and guilty pleas this year than in any other year in the history of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, in fact by almost twice as much. These are all significant cases with significant impacts, says Daniel Kahn, chief of the DOJ's FCPA Unit.

  • Why Information Governance Is More Important Than Ever

    Linda Sharp

    It used to be that hiring a good law firm was the single most important thing a company could do when facing litigation. You could now make the case that an organization’s most powerful asset in prosecuting or defending a claim is its information, says Linda Sharp, associate general counsel of ZL Technologies and chair of the ACC Information Governance Committee.

  • Opinion

    BigLaw Is Behind The Automation Curve

    Michael Moradzadeh

    In its new report on the effects of automation in the workplace, McKinsey Global Institute identifies lawyers as less susceptible to the sort of automation that could put one-third of American workers out of a career by 2030. This may seem reassuring, but it doesn't mean automation won't disrupt our bottom line, says Michael Moradzadeh of Rimon PC.

  • How District Courts Split Over 'Infringing Acts'

    Mike Abernathy

    Following the U.S. Supreme Court’s May 2017 TC Heartland decision, an open question was how to interpret the patent venue’s statutory language regarding “has committed acts of infringement” in the Hatch-Waxman Act context. Two courts have thus far addressed this issue, but each has interpreted the statutory language differently, say attorneys with Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP.

  • The Science And Controversy Of Offshore Wind

    Brook Detterman

    As the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management embarks on several studies to better understand offshore resources and species, fishing interests have sued BOEM to challenge not only an offshore wind lease, but the process used to award leases and conduct environmental analysis. The future of offshore wind in the United States may be at stake, says Brook Detterman of Beveridge & Diamond PC.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Cooke Reviews 'Constance Baker Motley'

    Judge Marcia Cooke

    Gary Ford's new book, "Constance Baker Motley: One Woman’s Fight for Civil Rights and Equal Justice Under Law," is more than a biography of the first African-American woman to become a federal judge. It presents in vivid detail how her work altered the legal landscape of the United States, says U.S. District Judge Marcia Cooke of the Southern District of Florida.

  • Keeping Your Law Library Relevant In The Age Of Google

    Donna Terjesen

    Google’s status as a go-to research tool has transformed legal research habits, leading critics to view law libraries as cost centers. Law firms should embrace Google-style research tools and manage costs efficiently in order to position their libraries as valuable assets for years to come, says Donna Terjesen of HBR Consulting.

  • 6 Things You Need To Know About Millennial Jurors

    Zachary Martin

    Millennials are now the largest living generation and comprise one-third of jurors. While it is impossible to generalize a group so large and diverse, trial lawyers should be mindful of certain generational differences, say baby boomer Lee Hollis and millennial Zachary Martin of Lightfoot Franklin & White LLC.

  • The Case Of New York’s 5Pointz: Who Owns Graffiti Art?

    Roberta Jacobs-Meadway

    Last month, a New York district court ruled in Cohen v. G&M that a real estate developer's demolition of famous graffiti space 5Pointz violated an obscure federal statute. This ruling may represent an expanded conception of what visual art qualifies for protection under the Visual Artists Rights Act, says Roberta Jacobs-Meadway of Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott LLC.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: A Journey From Conviction To Dismissal

    Janet Levine

    The twist in the Lindsey Manufacturing Foreign Corrupt Practices Act case was the truncated time in which we prepared. Having refused to waive their rights to a speedy trial, our clients took control of the case — this, along with the compressed time frame, forced the government to make errors, say Janet Levine, Sima Namiri-Kalantari and Megan Weisgerber of Crowell & Moring LLP.