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White Collar

  • June 13, 2018

    Ex-Morgan Stanley VP Made Hack-Based Trades, Plotter Says

    A onetime Georgia stock trader told a Brooklyn federal jury Wednesday that former Morgan Stanley Vice President Vitaly Korchevsky and ex-broker Vladislav Khalupsky traded on nonpublic information gleaned from hacked press releases as part of what prosecutors say was a $30 million fraud.

  • June 13, 2018

    Michael Cohen Splits With McDermott Legal Team

    Michael Cohen, personal attorney and self-described “fixer” for President Donald Trump, is in need of a new legal team as he splits with McDermott Will & Emery LLP, according to media reports Wednesday.

  • June 13, 2018

    Ex-NJ Lab Prez, Brother Get Prison In $100M Bribery Scheme

    The former president of a blood testing lab and his brother were slammed with prison sentences Wednesday in New Jersey federal court for their roles in a bribery scheme that garnered more than $100 million in Medicare and private insurance dollars for the now-defunct company.

  • June 13, 2018

    Calif. Couple Cops To Illegally Exporting Rifle Parts To Russia

    A California couple has admitted to illegally exporting night vision rifle scope components and thermal devices to Russia, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Tuesday.

  • June 13, 2018

    Madoff Trustee Recovers $280M In Ezra Merkin Settlement

    The trustee for Bernie Madoff's defunct investment firm Wednesday asked a New York bankruptcy court to approve a $280 million settlement of his claims that disgraced financier J. Ezra Merkin received fraudulent transfers from Madoff’s fund.

  • June 13, 2018

    5th Circ. Rejects Pill Mill Doc's Challenge To 5-Year Sentence

    A Fifth Circuit panel has upheld the five-year prison sentence given to a Houston doctor who was convicted on 19 counts related to running a pill mill that handed out more than 11,000 prescriptions for oxycodone over a seven-year period, rejecting his arguments that there were a lack of evidence and other flaws in the prosecution’s case. 

  • June 13, 2018

    2nd Circ. Revives Bid For Seized Funds By Tax Atty's Wife

    A Second Circuit panel on Wednesday vacated a district court's finding that allowed the federal government to seize funds an attorney who helped set up illegal tax shelters gave to his wife, writing that denying her chance to assert an argument would amount to a government seizure of property without due process.

  • June 13, 2018

    Hidden-Fee Scheme Cost UK Pension Plan $3M, Jury Hears

    A hidden-fee scheme federal prosecutors say was orchestrated by a former State Street Corp. executive cost the United Kingdom’s Royal Mail Pension plan 10 times more than it had expected to pay for a massive transaction, a Massachusetts jury heard Wednesday morning.

  • June 13, 2018

    3rd Circ. Denies Sanctions Rehearing Bid By Jailed Atty

    The Third Circuit on Wednesday declined to rehear a bid by a jailed Pennsylvania attorney, also a certified accountant, to overturn sanctions imposed over his failure to return $1.68 million he transferred out of retirement funds he managed to an account in the Caribbean.

  • June 13, 2018

    Consulting Co. Exec Convicted In 401(k) Embezzlement Case

    A federal jury on Tuesday convicted the former CEO of an Ohio tech consulting business on most of the charges contained in a December indictment that alleged he embezzled money from a 401(k) and profit-sharing plan and also didn’t pay the IRS thousands in taxes collected from workers, court records show.

  • June 13, 2018

    Immigration Atty Urges Court To Rethink DQ In EB-5 Suit

    A Chicago-based immigration attorney accused by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission of pocketing money from foreign investors seeking EB-5 visas urged an Illinois federal court Tuesday to rethink a decision barring him from representing several supplemental defendants in the case, rebutting contentions that there is a conflict of interest.

  • June 13, 2018

    Corrupt Ex-NYPD Deputy Chief Ducks Prison After Guilty Plea

    Michael Harrington, a former deputy chief with the New York Police Department who avoided trial on fraud and bribery charges by copping to a count of misusing government resources, avoided prison Wednesday when a Manhattan federal judge sentenced him to two years of probation.

  • June 13, 2018

    At SFO Trial Defense Claims Euribor Rig Was Honest Mistake

    A former Barclays PLC trader accused of illegally manipulating a key interest rate benchmark made an honest mistake when he asked colleagues to submit rates that would benefit the bank, his lawyer told a jury at a London crown court during closing arguments Wednesday.

  • June 12, 2018

    Boies Schiller Atty Sues FBI, DOJ Over McCabe Doc Requests

    One of Andrew McCabe’s attorneys at Boies Schiller Flexner LLP on Tuesday sued the FBI and the U.S. Department of Justice for allegedly holding out on a Freedom of Information Act request the lawyer says is essential for protecting and advancing the fired FBI deputy director’s legal interests.

  • June 12, 2018

    DOJ Charges 8 With Flouting Syria Fuel Sale Sanctions

    The U.S. Department of Justice announced Tuesday that it has charged eight foreign businessmen with conspiring to launder money and flout U.S. economic sanctions against Syria and Crimea by sending jet fuel to Syria via a Russian shipping company and freight forwarder.

  • June 12, 2018

    Ex-Morgan Stanley VP Traded On Hacked Co. Info, Jury Told

    A Brooklyn federal jury on Tuesday heard of how a former Morgan Stanley vice president and an ex-broker were allegedly part of a $30 million insider trading scheme that utilized hacked corporate press releases to trade ahead of earnings announcements and other company news, as an expected month-long trial kicked off.

  • June 12, 2018

    Disastrous Fyre Fest Organizer Nabbed In New Ticket Fraud

    The 26-year-old entrepreneur who pled guilty to fraud earlier this year after his plans for a music festival in the Bahamas left would-be concertgoers stranded and investors fuming was charged on Tuesday with running another event-ticket fraud scheme while on pretrial release.

  • June 12, 2018

    No Bail For Atty Accused Of Lengthy Cyberstalking Campaign

    A lawyer charged with a multiyear campaign of making threats against a woman he briefly dated was denied bail Tuesday by a Manhattan federal judge, who saw a mix of circumstances that created a "serious risk" that the suspect might harm or threaten the woman if released.

  • June 12, 2018

    Feds Say Intent A Non-Issue In South Korean Bribe Case

    Prosecutors are seeking to shut down an appeal by a Korean earthquake researcher convicted of laundering bribes, telling the Ninth Circuit on Monday that the South Korean law he violated does not focus on a bribe-taker's intent in the same way U.S. laws do.

  • June 12, 2018

    Payday Loan Scammer Gets 10 Years For $220M Scheme

    A Manhattan federal judge sentenced a convicted loan shark to 10 years in prison Tuesday for a decadelong payday lending scam, rejecting the 73-year-old defendant’s effort to blame the brother of a fellow convict for convincing him to set up the businesses.

Expert Analysis

  • How We Got Here: A Look Back At Trailblazing Women In Law

    Jill Norgren

    Today's female lawyers stand on the shoulders of several generations of pioneers. Here, historian Jill Norgren explains how the status of women in the legal profession has changed since the 1870s.

  • Getting The Snaps And Tweets Into Evidence

    Matthew Hamilton

    Litigants who proffer data obtained from social networking sites like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram must authenticate that data before it will be admitted as evidence. Attorneys with Pepper Hamilton LLP examine decisions from Pennsylvania and other jurisdictions to determine whether courts are imposing a more demanding standard for social media data than other documentary evidence.

  • Crypto Market Surveillance Has Arrived

    Sharon Brown-Hruska

    The recent wave of spoofing and manipulation enforcement actions washing over cryptocurrency markets, aided by increasing market surveillance, may cause concern in some quarters. However, precedents in established futures and spot markets suggest that, in the long run, the market will likely see benefits from increased surveillance, say members of NERA Economic Consulting.

  • Kinross Settlement Highlights FCPA Risks For Mining Cos.

    Collmann Griffin

    In March, a Canadian gold and silver mining company agreed to pay nearly $1 million to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission over alleged violations of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The case shows the risks faced by companies that fail to implement appropriate controls post-acquisition, particularly in the mining industry, says Collmann Griffin of Miller and Chevalier Chtd.

  • Introducing The Legal Industry To Millennial Business Owners

    Yaima Seigley

    ​The current business climate has produced vast opportunities for seasoned lawyers to create valuable connections with millennial business owners, but first lawyers must cleanse their palate of misconceptions regarding millennials, says Yaima Seigley of Isaac Wiles Burkholder & Teetor LLC.

  • US Law As Trade War Weapon

    Hdeel Abdelhady

    The United States effectively forced Chinese smartphone manufacturer ZTE to cease major operations this month, after the U.S. Department of Commerce blocked its access to vital U.S.-made components. The case puts into focus the Trump administration’s use of sanctions, anti-corruption and anti-money laundering laws as trade war weapons against economic rivals, says Hdeel Abdelhady of MassPoint Legal and Strategy Advisory PLLC.

  • Criminal Antitrust Enforcement Has A New Leader

    Tara Reinhart

    For the first time in many years, the deputy assistant attorney general for criminal enforcement at the U.S. Department of Justice Antitrust Division will come from outside the Antitrust Division. The appointment of Richard A. Powers is important because he could stay in the role well beyond this administration, say attorneys with Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • 6 Ways To Manage International Regulatory Risk Under Trump

    Gregory Husisian

    Recent enforcement activity — including record-setting Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and economic sanctions penalties — confirms that the Trump administration is committed to the aggressive application of U.S. law abroad. Multinational companies need to prioritize managing the risks posed by laws governing U.S. exports and international conduct, say Gregory Husisian and Olivia Singelmann of Foley & Lardner LLP.

  • Opinion

    Why Won't Judicial Nominees Affirm Brown V. Board Of Ed?

    Franita Tolson

    On May 17, 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court decided Brown v. Board of Education, recognizing a moral and legal truth that should be beyond question in American society. The refusal by some of President Donald Trump's judicial nominees to say whether they believe the case was decided correctly is indicative of the narrow-minded elitism they would bring to the bench, says professor Franita Tolson of the University of Southern California's Gould School of Law.

  • The Lawyers' Guide To Cloud Computing

    Daniel Garrie

    In deciding whether cloud computing is right for the organization or firm, an attorney must consider cloud computing’s significant impact on the electronic discovery process, say Daniel Garrie, managing partner at Law & Forensics LLC, and David Cass, chief information security officer at IBM Cloud.