White Collar

  • May 12, 2021

    Jenner & Block Partner Appointed To Monitor UAW Deal

    A Michigan federal judge on Wednesday granted the government's unopposed motion to appoint Jenner & Block LLP partner Neil Barofsky as an independent monitor to help carry out a consent decree that ended a sprawling probe into the United Auto Workers union.

  • May 12, 2021

    9th Circ. Revives Charges Over DOD Contract Fraud Scheme

    The Ninth Circuit on Wednesday revived charges against a former military contracting officer over his alleged role in a bribery scheme, saying a law pausing the expiration of certain claims during wartime did not require fraud claims to be connected to a specific war.

  • May 12, 2021

    SEC Fines Broker $1.5M For Failure To Report Cybercrimes

    A broker-dealer of Empower Retirement must pay $1.5 million to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission for failing to file hundreds of suspicious-activity reports despite knowing that bad actors were hacking, or attempting to hack, customer accounts, the agency announced Wednesday.

  • May 12, 2021

    Feds Say Private Equity CEO Forged Docs To Get $95M Loan

    The CEO of a private equity fund lied about his investors and used bogus financial documents to obtain a $95 million loan from a California bank, according to an indictment handed up in Manhattan federal court Wednesday.

  • May 12, 2021

    Investors Seek $6M Win In Suit Over Failed Hotel Project

    A group of investors has asked a New York federal court for a judgment of more than $6 million in its suit accusing hotel developers of stealing funds for a project in Colombia that never happened, saying the developers breached their obligation to repay the money that was loaned.

  • May 12, 2021

    Ghislaine Maxwell Sex Trafficking Trial Set For November

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday set a November trial date for Ghislaine Maxwell, the former associate of deceased financier Jeffrey Epstein, on sex trafficking charges.

  • May 12, 2021

    Antitrust Violation Not Enough To Revoke Realtor's License

    A Florida appeals court on Wednesday reversed the revocation of a realtor's real estate license, finding that the Department of Business and Professional Regulation did not have the authority to discipline him based solely on his conviction for antitrust violations.

  • May 12, 2021

    2 Charged For Roles In $650M Weed, Cattle Ponzi Scheme

    An indictment unsealed Tuesday in Colorado federal court charged an Illinois woman and a Georgia man over their roles in a Ponzi scheme involving cannabis and cattle that raised around $650 million from investors nationwide, the U.S. Department of Justice said Wednesday.

  • May 12, 2021

    NJ Judge Shoots Down FCA Suit Over Lobbyist Payments

    A New Jersey federal judge dismissed a False Claims Act lawsuit against Bayada Home Health Care Inc. on Wednesday, saying it failed to make the case that the company's decision not to disclose how it paid a lobbyist when buying an Ocean City home health care agency impacted the federal government through its Medicaid and Medicare programs.

  • May 12, 2021

    Biden Orders IT Gov't Contractors To Report Data Breaches

    President Joe Biden created a new national review board for major cyberattacks and ordered IT sector government contractors to report data breaches as part of an executive order issued Wednesday after hacks on a major U.S. pipeline company and federal agencies.

  • May 12, 2021

    Father-Son Investment Duo Can't Duck SEC's Fraud Claims

    A California federal judge on Tuesday refused to dismiss U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission claims that a dad impersonated his son in order to give professional financial advice to clients when he was unable to access brokerage platforms himself.

  • May 12, 2021

    Firms Can't Shake RICO Suit Over Loan Scheme, Court Told

    A now-defunct investment partnership urged an Illinois federal judge not to let two law firms escape civil racketeering claims it launched over their alleged roles in a fraudulent loan scheme, arguing the attorneys should be forced to answer for their conduct.

  • May 12, 2021

    DC Judge Sanctions Paul Weiss, Alex Oh In Exxon Case

    A D.C. federal judge opted Wednesday to admonish Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP and former firm partner Alex Oh in connection with the Exxon human rights case that appears to have led Oh to resign prematurely from her new post as enforcement head of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • May 12, 2021

    Ex-Electric Co. Controller Charged By Feds With $17M Fraud

    The former controller of a New York City electric contractor siphoned $17 million from the company so that she and her Florida family could live a "life of luxury," the Manhattan U.S. Attorney's office said Wednesday, unveiling charges against her, her husband and two children.

  • May 12, 2021

    Greenberg Traurig Adds Ex-U.S. Atty In Houston

    Greenberg Traurig LLP has added a former federal prosecutor to its white collar defense and investigations practice as a shareholder in Houston, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • May 12, 2021

    Ex-TGP Exec Gets 3 Months For 'Varsity Blues' Exam Bribe

    A Massachusetts federal judge sentenced a former TGP Capital private equity executive to three months behind bars Wednesday for paying a $50,000 bribe in the "Varsity Blues" scandal to boost his son's standardized test scores.

  • May 12, 2021

    Top EU Court Rules Double Jeopardy Ban Can Halt Arrest

    Individuals prosecuted for crimes in one European Union country should not face arrest in another at the behest of nations outside the bloc — but only if their legal troubles are behind them, Europe's top court ruled Wednesday.

  • May 11, 2021

    Elizabeth Holmes' Mystique Unlikely To Survive Looming Trial

    Before Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes and her ex-boyfriend were charged with deceiving investors and patients about their blood-testing technology's efficacy, the pair exchanged voluminous text messages that now threaten to provide jurors at Holmes' criminal trial this summer a rare window into her psyche.

  • May 11, 2021

    Gibson Dunn Atty Rebuts Donziger Privacy Concerns At Trial

    A Gibson Dunn & Crutcher partner testified Tuesday in Chevron foe Steven Donziger's contempt trial that a court order mandating him to hand over his devices included privacy protections, despite Donziger's fears about delivering the entire body of his communications to the company.

  • May 11, 2021

    Gov't May Lean On Private Sector To Stop Next Critical Hack

    Convincing private businesses to open up to the government about cybercrime could be key in preventing future hacks of U.S. critical infrastructure, a risk underscored by a ransomware attack that has shuttered one of the nation's largest fuel pipelines.

  • May 11, 2021

    NJ To Resume In-Person Jury Trials As Virus Trends Improve

    The New Jersey Supreme Court signed off Tuesday on holding grand jury sessions and certain criminal and civil jury trials in person starting next month amid improving public health conditions throughout the Garden State in the battle against COVID-19.

  • May 11, 2021

    Taxpayers Hold $2T Abroad In Tax Havens, IRS Official Says

    U.S. taxpayers could hold as much as $2 trillion in assets in low-tax haven jurisdictions, a top research and analytics officer at the Internal Revenue Service said Tuesday during a Senate hearing.

  • May 11, 2021

    BitMEX Anti-Money Laundering Trial Set For March

    A New York federal judge on Tuesday set a trial date next spring for the founders of BitMEX on charges that the offshore cryptocurrency derivatives exchange evaded U.S. anti-money laundering rules.

  • May 11, 2021

    Court Tosses RICO Claims Against Cannabis Cos.

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Tuesday dismissed racketeering claims against a group of New Mexico cannabis companies, saying that a purported plan to open a medical marijuana treatment center did not amount to coordinated criminal activity.

  • May 11, 2021

    Ex-UAW Prez Williams Gets 21 Months In Embezzlement Case

    Former United Auto Workers President Dennis Williams was sentenced to 21 months in prison Tuesday for accepting luxurious gifts paid for with union funds, part of a sprawling embezzlement scheme that led to more than a dozen convictions.

Expert Analysis

  • What OECD Scrutiny Means For Anti-Corruption In Brazil

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    Attorneys at Paul Hastings examine how an unprecedented standing subgroup recently created by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development to monitor Brazil's anti-corruption efforts reflects significant uncertainty regarding the country's commitment to enforcement, and what companies can do to address foreign bribery risk and strengthen compliance programs.

  • The Pandemic's Bright Spots For Lawyers Who Are Parents

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    The COVID-19 crisis has allowed lawyers to hone remote advocacy strategies and effectively represent clients with minimal travel — abilities that have benefited working parents and should be utilized long after the pandemic is over, says Chelsea Loughran at Wolf Greenfield.

  • Opinion

    Time To Replace FBI Interview Memos With Digital Recordings

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    As part of his law enforcement reforms, President Joe Biden should retire the Federal Bureau of Investigation's often incomplete and unreliable Form 302 for memorializing agents' witness interview notes and instead mandate digital recording of interviews as a more trustworthy and efficient substitute, says cybersecurity consultant John Reed Stark.

  • Opinion

    Supreme Court Is Right In Limiting Gov't Agency Authority

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    Although the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decisions in Facebook v. Duguid and AMG Capital Management v. Federal Trade Commission limit government agencies' power against robocallers and scam artists, they ultimately protect Americans from the greater threat of government overreach, says Eric Troutman at Squire Patton.

  • Economic Sanctions And Export Controls: A Q1 Update

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    Attorneys at Kirkland discuss first-quarter developments in U.S. export controls and economic sanctions and what they may indicate about the Biden administration's national security and foreign policy agenda. 

  • Opinion

    Revise Mansfield Diversity Mandates To Also Benefit Veterans

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    The well-intentioned efforts and salutary purposes of the legal industry's Mansfield Rule diversity metric are tainted by the Diversity Lab initiative's omission of veterans, who are underrepresented at large law firms and entitled to advantageous treatment based on more than 200 years of public policy, says Robert Redmond at McGuireWoods.

  • AGs To Fill Void As Justices Say FTC Can't Impose Restitution

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    State attorneys general are likely to emerge as even more influential consumer protection enforcers, taking the lead in federal-state restitution partnerships, following the U.S. Supreme Court's determination Thursday in AMG Capital v. Federal Trade Commission that the FTC is not authorized to seek equitable monetary relief, say Alissa Gardenswartz and former Sen. Mark Pryor at Brownstein Hyatt.

  • Crypto Bills Show Consensus On Need For Federal Oversight

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    Several new legislative proposals attempting to clarify the legal framework governing the digital asset space reflect the recognition that cryptocurrencies' rising popularity, rapid pace of change and volatility make federal regulation crucial for protecting investors and promoting innovation, say Jonathan Marcus and Stephanie Cannuli at Skadden.

  • 5th Circ.'s Health Care Fraud Ruling May Help Defendants Broadly

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    The Fifth Circuit's recent decision in U.S. v. Nora, reversing a defendant's health care fraud conviction, highlights the difficulty in proving a defendant's intent and may strengthen myriad defense theories, say Richard Roper and Elissa McClure at Thompson & Knight.

  • Lessons From Key Expert Testimony In Chauvin Trial

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    During the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, pulmonologist Martin Tobin gave a gripping account of the cause of George Floyd’s death, engaging jurors in creative ways and bringing five important lessons for lawyers preparing expert witnesses, say Harlan Prater and Logan Matthews at Lightfoot Franklin.

  • What To Expect From FinCEN's Beneficial Ownership Rules

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    The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network's recent request for input on the Corporate Transparency Act's beneficial ownership reporting obligations offers insight into FinCEN's thinking on how to implement them, and suggests the regulator may be considering some unexpected requirements, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Using Cryptocurrency To Evade Sanctions Creates New Risks

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    As sanctioned countries and individuals increasingly use cryptocurrency to circumvent restrictions on their access to mainstream international financial markets, companies providing digital currency services need to step up efforts to identify illegal transactions undertaken using their services, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • Prepare For Global Collaboration In Crypto Tax Enforcement

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    Recent Internal Revenue Service victories involving John Doe summonses served on cryptocurrency exchanges — and statements by the Joint Chiefs of Global Tax Enforcement about global collaboration in cryptocurrency-related tax investigations — should prompt assessment of prior virtual currency transactions and remediation before an enforcement agency shows up at the door, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • Lessons From Federal Fraud Charges Against UBiome

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's and U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's recent fraud allegations against uBiome executives illustrate the challenges of navigating interactions between clinical testing companies, health insurers and government oversight efforts, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Why The Future Law Firm Model Is Industry-Based Offerings

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    Multidisciplinary, industry-based groups at law firms allow for more holistic legal advice, lead to sustainable client relationships, and are likely to replace practice group monoliths at many firms, say Jennifer Simpson Carr at Furia Rubel, Timothy Corcoran at Corcoran Consulting and Mike Mellor at Pryor Cashman.

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