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White Collar

  • June 12, 2019

    Rise Of Nation-State Hacks Doesn't Give Cos. A Free Pass

    Businesses may try to escape liability from cyberattacks by blaming skilled, nation-state-backed hackers, but attorneys on both sides of the bar say attribution likely won't matter if a company had subpar digital defenses.

  • June 12, 2019

    Boies Schiller Gets OK To Rep 2 'Varsity Blues' Defendants

    A Boston federal court has decided that Boies Schiller Flexner LLP can continue to represent two defendants in the Varsity Blues college admissions cheating case, despite the fact that one parent is cooperating with the government and may be called upon to testify against the other.

  • June 12, 2019

    Philly Atty Can't Bar Remarks From Amazon's Meek Mill Film

    A prominent Philadelphia trial lawyer looking to block critical comments he made about a city judge he was representing from an upcoming Amazon documentary about rapper Meek Mill's criminal case should have known better than to make the remarks at all, a federal judge ruled on Wednesday.

  • June 12, 2019

    Atty Cops Plea In Extortion Case Tied To Pump-And-Dump

    A Long Island personal injury attorney on Wednesday admitted to taking part in what prosecutors say was a scheme by a convicted securities fraudster to try to extort $7 million from a former co-defendant and launder the funds through a religious charity. 

  • June 12, 2019

    Flynn Ditches Covington Team For Mueller Conspiracist

    Ex-national security adviser Michael Flynn has hired a lawyer who peddled conspiracy theories about the special counsel's investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election to replace Covington & Burling LLP as he faces sentencing on a charge of lying to investigators.

  • June 12, 2019

    Trump Officials Raised Counterintel Alarm, Ex-FBI Agents Say

    Multiple actions undertaken by members of President Donald Trump's campaign before and after the 2016 presidential election raised legitimate counterintelligence concerns, two former FBI officials told the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence during a Wednesday hearing on the counterintelligence implications of the Mueller report.

  • June 12, 2019

    House Panel OKs Requiring Cos. To Identify Beneficial Owners

    A House committee approved legislation Wednesday that would require companies to disclose the identity of their beneficial owners in an effort to unmask anonymous shell companies and help law enforcement combat illicit money laundering and tax evasion.

  • June 12, 2019

    Jailed $2B Loan Scammer Doubles Down On Tribal Defense

    Former racing driver Scott Tucker told the Second Circuit on Wednesday his conviction for running a $2 billion criminal payday loan empire is flawed, returning to a tribal sovereignty defense that failed at trial even as an appellate judge called the evidence against him “overwhelming.”

  • June 12, 2019

    No Prison Time For Coach In First 'Varsity Blues' Sentencing

    The former sailing coach at Stanford University avoided prison for his role in the nationwide college admissions scandal known as "Varsity Blues," with a Massachusetts federal judge handing down the first sentence in the headline-grabbing case Wednesday afternoon.

  • June 12, 2019

    Milberg, Convicted Ex-Partner End $15M Reorganization Fight

    Milberg LLP has struck a confidential deal in a $15 million case brought in New York state court by an ex-partner and convicted felon who alleged his former firm reorganized to deprive him of payments he was owed.

  • June 12, 2019

    NJ Man Gets 2 Years For $1.1M Wellness Co. Microcap Fraud

    A federal judge in Trenton sentenced a New Jersey man to 25 months in prison on Wednesday over his admitted $1.1 million scheme to defraud investors in a microcap company that purported to be a "wellness social community" for people and animals.

  • June 12, 2019

    Ex-MSU Dean Found Guilty Of Neglect In Supervising Nassar

    A former Michigan State University dean was found guilty Wednesday of failing to properly supervise ex-sports doctor and serial sexual abuser Larry Nassar.

  • June 12, 2019

    Wellness Co. CEO Pleads Guilty To Penny Stock Fraud

    A Chicago wellness company CEO pled guilty to securities fraud in Illinois federal court Tuesday in the government’s suit over penny stock manipulation, less than a year after the executive settled a suit with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission over similar allegations.

  • June 12, 2019

    NJ Woman Cops To Smuggling $2M In Aircraft Parts To Iran

    A New Jersey woman has pled guilty for her role in a scheme to smuggle $2 million worth of U.S.-made aircraft parts to Iranian airlines, including one with ties to Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, which the Trump administration recently labeled a terrorist group, the U.S. Department of Justice said Tuesday.

  • June 11, 2019

    Dershowitz's Bid To DQ Boies Schiller Flops For Flouting Rule

    Alan Dershowitz can't immediately have Boies Schiller Flexner LLP tossed from representing a woman claiming Dershowitz sexually molested her when she was a child — and later defamed her when she came forward — because he didn't follow court rules when submitting his motion, a New York federal judge ruled Tuesday.

  • June 11, 2019

    DC Circ. Affirms Convictions In $80M Health Care Fraud

    The D.C. Circuit affirmed Tuesday the convictions of a Maryland couple on charges of health care fraud and money laundering, finding that last-minute evidence submitted by the government was ultimately deflated during cross-examination, with a concurring judge slamming prosecutors.

  • June 11, 2019

    Silicon Valley's US Attorney Makes A Bid To Innovate

    In his first six months as U.S. attorney, David Anderson has switched up how the Northern District of California handles cases in a bid to increase efficiency in prosecuting everything from cryptocurrency schemes to trade secret theft and beyond, Anderson told Law360 on Tuesday.

  • June 11, 2019

    Treasury Blacklists Syrian Luxury Developer For Assad Ties

    The U.S. Department of the Treasury on Tuesday slapped sanctions on a Syrian luxury developer and his business empire, which includes the Four Seasons Damascus, in a bid to choke out financial assistance to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s regime.

  • June 11, 2019

    Wound Care Co. Pays $15M, Admits Contamination Cover-Up

    Wound-care company ACell Inc. has agreed to pay $15 million to resolve claims it covered up contamination in certain products it sold, in addition to pleading guilty in a related criminal case in Maryland federal court, the U.S. Department of Justice announced on Tuesday.

  • June 11, 2019

    Feds Say Taped Calls Are Fair Game In Oil Bribery Case

    Prosecutors said Monday that a Florida man accused of bribing PetroEcuador officials can't claim to have lawyered up before he was secretly recorded by an informant because the recordings dealt with a crime that hadn't yet been committed.

  • June 11, 2019

    Platinum Judge Won't Toss Case, May Limit Feds' Closings

    The judge overseeing the securities fraud trial of the former top executives of Platinum Partners on Tuesday said he intends to deny their midtrial bids to escape the charges, but indicated he was likely to preclude the government from arguing that the hedge fund overvalued its assets.

  • June 11, 2019

    Life Time Fitness Stock Tipster Gets Year In Prison

    The lead tipster in an insider trading scheme based on Life Time Fitness Inc.'s planned take-private acquisition got sentenced Tuesday to one year and one day in prison.

  • June 11, 2019

    New HHS Inspector General 'Not Afraid To Do Anything'

    The new inspector general for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has become the nation’s top health care watchdog just as her office prepares to unveil major anti-kickback policies, and she tells Law360 that companies should expect forceful oversight of taxpayer dollars and patient care.

  • June 11, 2019

    Insys Seeks Speedy Ch. 11 Sale As Liabilities Mount

    Insys Therapeutics Inc. told a Delaware judge Tuesday it is taking responsibility for its part in the nation’s opioid crisis as it moves quickly toward a Chapter 11 sale of its assets and a plan to pay legal liabilities, including roughly $200 million to settle government claims.

  • June 11, 2019

    House Authorizes Court Action On Barr, McGahn Subpoenas

    The U.S. House of Representatives voted Tuesday to authorize Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., to hold Attorney General William Barr and former White House counsel Don McGahn in civil contempt after the two failed to comply with subpoenas.

Expert Analysis

  • Impact Of Justices' Excessive Fines Ruling Will Vary By State

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    Following the U.S. Supreme Court's excessive fines decision in Timbs v. Indiana, many states will be applying the Eighth Amendment’s proportionality requirement to their civil forfeiture statutes for the first time. But West Coast states have been ahead of the curve, say Vince Farhat and Kristin Asai of Holland & Knight.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Conrad Reviews 'The Jury Crisis'

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    In "The Jury Crisis," jury consultant and social psychologist Drury Sherrod spotlights the vanishing jury trial, providing a fascinating canary-in-the-coal-mine warning for lawyers, litigants and society at large, says U.S. District Judge Robert Conrad of the Western District of North Carolina.

  • How Warren Bill Would Change Liability For Corporate Execs

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    If the criminal penalties in the Corporate Executive Accountability Act — recently proposed by Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. — ever became law, they would usher in sweeping implications for the way big companies approach their legal compliance efforts, say Stephen Cheng and Noah Smith of The Volkov Law Group.

  • A Reminder To Address Sanctions Compliance Shortfalls

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    The sanctions enforcement action and major settlement with Standard Chartered highlights U.S. and U.K. regulators’ continued focus on compliance, and their specific attention to the lapses in internal controls that led to the alleged violations, say attorneys with Paul Hastings.

  • Revamping Your Approach To Client Development

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    As a former general counsel for both public and private companies, my advice to law firm attorneys who want to attract and keep clients is simple — provide certain legal services for free, says Noel Elfant, founder of General Counsel Practice.

  • SEC Has Been Busy In FY 2019

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    Despite enduring the long government shutdown, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s Division of Enforcement filed more cases in the first six months of this fiscal year than in the same period last year, suggesting enforcement activity will remain vigorous throughout 2019, say attorneys at Covington & Burling.

  • Highlights From 'SEC Speaks' 2019

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    At the SEC Speaks conference this week, leadership and staff from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission showcased last year's successes and outlined 2019 initiatives, providing practical guidance for practitioners before the SEC, say attorneys with Perkins Coie.

  • 4 Tips For Global Patient Support Compliance: Part 1

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    As multinational health care companies increase investment in organizations outside of the U.S., they must ensure that their efforts to globalize patient support compliance do not lag behind, say attorneys at Paul Hastings.

  • What Lawyers Must Know Before Acting As Escrow Agents

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    The moment an attorney agrees to serve as an escrow agent for a client, the attorney assumes some of the most important obligations in the legal profession. Significantly, these obligations potentially extend to third parties who are not clients, say Scott Watnik and Michael Contos of Wilk Auslander.

  • Why There Isn't A Subpoena For The Mueller Report Yet

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    To begin the process for obtaining special counsel Robert Mueller's full report, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., could have simply issued a unilateral subpoena. But his alternative route has strengthened the House’s legal hand in several ways, say Emily Loeb and Zach Blau of Jenner & Block.

  • Freelance Attorneys Are An Asset To In-House Legal Teams

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    With recent technological advances and a broader acceptance of flexible work arrangements, the opportunity for freelance attorneys is greater than ever, as is the value that this freelance workforce can create for companies, says Ben Levi of InCloudCounsel.

  • Now In Congress: Budget, Nominations, Mueller Report

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    As both chambers of Congress grapple with difficult decisions on appropriations bills, there is partisan rancor over President Donald Trump's budget proposal, the report of special counsel Robert Mueller, and rule changes for debate over presidential nominations, says Layth Elhassani of Covington & Burling.

  • 5 Principles For Responding To Government Investigations

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    While not every government-issued subpoena will lead to a multiyear probe, criminal fines, forfeiture and disgorgement — like the U.S. government’s recently settled bribery investigation into Mobile TeleSystems — five key fundamentals can provide an instrument to triage and resolve such inquires on more favorable terms, says Holly Drumheller Butler of Miles & Stockbridge.

  • Book Excerpt

    'Big Tech' Questions Echo Early Days Of US Corporate Law

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    The current calls to curb the power of Google, Facebook and Amazon recall an earlier time in American history, when the “bigness” of oil, steel and tobacco was front and center in national politics. And in those debates, the top lawyers of the day had a major voice, says John Oller, author of the new book "White Shoe."

  • What Restitution Could Mean For SEC Enforcement Cases

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    A Senate bill would allow the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to pursue restitution in cases against members of the securities industry. But adding this power to the SEC’s arsenal is a major leap that should only be taken after all stakeholders have carefully weighed its implications, says Stephen Crimmins of Murphy & McGonigle.

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