White Collar

  • June 02, 2021

    Del. Judge Sets Jail-Risk Deadline For Crypto Firm Ex-CFO

    The former chief financial officer of bankrupt cryptocurrency venture Cred Inc. has one more chance to disclose the amounts and whereabouts of cash and virtual currency under his control before facing possible arrest, a federal judge in Delaware warned Wednesday.

  • June 02, 2021

    Dealerships Seek Sanctions In Hyundai Engine Fraud Suit

    A group of dealerships accused by Hyundai Motor America Corp. of deliberately damaging engines to collect on warranty payments is urging a Florida federal court to sanction the automaker, saying it failed to preserve hundreds of engines that would have been crucial evidence in the case.

  • June 02, 2021

    Bursor & Fisher Eyes Lead In Ripple Investors' XRP Row

    Bursor & Fisher PA is seeking the lead counsel spot in a proposed class action against blockchain payment system Ripple Labs in Florida federal court, saying the firm is more than qualified to represent investors accusing the company of fraudulently selling more than 14 billion unregistered XRP tokens.

  • June 02, 2021

    Man Sentenced For Laundering From Del. Law Firm, Others

    A Georgia federal judge has sentenced an Atlanta man to more than two years in prison for laundering more than $247,000 from a Delaware law firm, a New Jersey company and homebuyers in Minnesota and Oregon in business email compromise scams.

  • June 01, 2021

    Senate OKs More Funding For CFTC Whistleblower Program

    The U.S. Senate on Friday gave the green light to the creation of a temporary second account to house funds for the Commodities Futures Trading Commission's whistleblower program, a move that would allow it to continue operating at a financially precarious time for the office.

  • June 01, 2021

    Shkreli Punished For Secret Phone But Can Deny Conspiracy

    A New York federal judge on Tuesday sanctioned disgraced pharmaceutical executive Martin Shkreli, after finding that the Federal Trade Commission demonstrated that Shkreli used a contraband phone to conduct business affairs while still incarcerated.

  • June 01, 2021

    Hemp Co., Execs To Pay $10M SEC Penalty Over Stock Sales

    Industrial hemp company Hemp Inc. and its two leaders will pay $10 million in penalties to resolve U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission claims that they used a network of shell companies to improperly sell unregistered securities, according to settlement documents filed Friday.

  • June 01, 2021

    NY AG Demands Kodak Execs Testify In Insider Trading Probe

    New York Attorney General Letitia James is demanding that Eastman Kodak Co.'s CEO and general counsel testify in open court regarding alleged insider trading tied to a COVID-19 medical supply deal between the company and the government, according to a petition filed Tuesday in New York state court.

  • June 01, 2021

    BCLP Picks Up NY Prosecutor With Crypto, FCPA Chops

    Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP is bulking up its global litigation and investigations practice with a former New York federal prosecutor whose resume includes Foreign Corrupt Practices Act victories and a precedent-setting cryptocurrency fraud ruling.

  • June 01, 2021

    Pro-Border Wall Group Challenges Asset Freeze At 2nd Circ.

    The border wall crowdfunding organization We Build the Wall and its general counsel asked the Second Circuit on Tuesday to undo an order restraining its bank accounts, saying a lower court erred in restraining them without due process.

  • June 01, 2021

    Top Goldman Sachs Sanctions Lawyer Joins Steptoe

    Steptoe & Johnson LLP announced on Tuesday that it has hired the ex-senior legal director of Goldman Sachs' business intelligence group — where he focused on the firm's compliance with international sanctions requirements — as a partner within its international trade and regulatory compliance group.

  • June 01, 2021

    'Wolf Of Wall Street' Fraudster Sued For Securities Sales

    Convicted securities fraudster Victor Wang, who was associated with the notorious brokerage firm depicted in the movie "The Wolf of Wall Street," has been hit with a suit alleging he and his affiliates continued to engage in securities fraud through an oil company and a CBD venture.

  • June 01, 2021

    Dem Advisory Panel Backs 2 Northern Fla. US Atty Hopefuls

    A nominating committee that advises Florida Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives has recommended two candidates for President Joe Biden to consider for the U.S. Attorney's Office in the Northern District of Florida.

  • June 01, 2021

    DOJ Appellate Leader Returns To Jones Day As Partner

    A former counselor to the U.S. Solicitor General who spent the last four years overseeing significant appellate litigation at the DOJ has rejoined Jones Day as a partner in the firm's issues and appeals practice, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • June 01, 2021

    Vaccines May Moot Virtual Atty-Client Meets, Mass. Court Says

    With vaccines widely available and COVID-19 case counts dwindling, Massachusetts' top court hinted Tuesday it won't force state jails and prisons to let lawyers meet with clients via video conference or require the testing of all inmates.

  • June 01, 2021

    Justices Say Tribal Police Can Detain Non-Indians

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday overturned a Ninth Circuit decision limiting tribal police authority on public highways within reservation boundaries, saying the need to protect public safety requires that tribal police be able to detain non-Indian suspects.

  • May 28, 2021

    Law360 Names 2021's Top Attorneys Under 40

    We're pleased to announce Law360's Rising Stars for 2021, our list of 180 attorneys under 40 whose legal accomplishments transcend their age.

  • May 28, 2021

    Trader Owes $23M In FINRA 'Short Squeeze' Arbitration Case

    A Financial Industry Regulatory Authority arbitration panel has ordered an ex-Spartan Securities Group trader to pay the firm and a third party a total of nearly $23 million for allegedly making unauthorized short trades that crippled Spartan in 2019, according to an award filing made public Friday.

  • May 28, 2021

    ​​​​​​​Nev. Exporter Charged In Alleged Iran Export Conspiracy

    A Las Vegas resident was arraigned this week on charges that she knowingly conspired to ship electronic components to Iran, exposing her to a potential sentence of up to 20 years in prison and a $1 million fine.

  • May 28, 2021

    Elizabeth Holmes Wants 45-Page Questionnaire For Jurors

    Former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes asked a California federal judge Thursday to ramp up the screening criteria for jury selection in her upcoming fraud trial, saying the "extraordinary, highly prejudicial publicity" surrounding the downfall of the blood-testing startup requires careful scrutiny of potential juror bias.

  • May 28, 2021

    SolarWinds Attackers Said To Return With Phishing Campaign

    The Russia-backed spy group allegedly behind a hack of SolarWinds Corp. that led to breaches at numerous U.S. government agencies has launched a new phishing campaign impersonating the U.S. Agency for International Development, researchers at Microsoft have said.

  • May 28, 2021

    Biden Science Adviser Approved By Senate

    The U.S. Senate easily confirmed a prominent geneticist to lead the Office of Science and Technology Policy, cementing his space as the first science adviser in a presidential cabinet.

  • May 28, 2021

    11th Circ. Upholds Convictions Of Ex-Balch Partner, Coal Exec

    The Eleventh Circuit upheld the bribery convictions of a coal company executive and a former Balch & Bingham environmental partner, saying it found no reason to disturb jury findings that the two paid an Alabama legislator to help dodge Superfund cleanup liability.

  • May 28, 2021

    Top Aide To Ex-Ill. Speaker Pleads Not Guilty To Perjury

    A top aide to former Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan pled not guilty Friday to charges of lying to a grand jury investigating allegations that Commonwealth Edison bribed public officials in its push to change utility regulation.

  • May 28, 2021

    'Varsity Blues' Mom Says Arrest Caused Serious Heart Trouble

    A mother charged in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions case asked a federal judge to toss the charges Friday, claiming the heavy show of force agents used in arresting her caused her to suffer a dangerous cardiac incident known as broken heart syndrome.

Expert Analysis

  • Ways Universities Can Improve Foreign Influence Compliance

    Author Photo

    U.S. universities should take practical steps to monitor and effectively manage compliance risks related to collaborative research relationships with China, given the likelihood of continued scrutiny under the Biden administration, says Robert Roach at Guidepost Solutions.

  • Virtual Litigation May Unravel The Narcissistic Lawyer

    Author Photo

    The virtual courtroom limits a narcissistic lawyer's ability to intimidate witnesses and opposing counsel, boast to clients or engage in grandstanding — an unexpected benefit of the global pandemic as some aspects of remote litigation are likely here to stay, says Jennifer Gibbs at Zelle.

  • ABA Remote Work Guide Raises Bar For Atty Tech Know-How

    Author Photo

    A recent American Bar Association opinion on lawyers' ethical duties of competence and confidentiality when working remotely should be viewed as part of a larger movement by which attorneys are being exhorted to develop competence in 21st century technology, say Jennifer Goldsmith at Ironshore and Barry Temkin at Mound Cotton.

  • Lateral Hire Conflict Screening Lessons From DLA Piper Case

    Author Photo

    While a Texas federal court recently denied a motion to disqualify DLA Piper from representing Apple in a patent dispute after the law firm hired an attorney who formerly represented opponent Maxwell, the case is a reminder that robust conflict checks during lateral hiring can save firms the time and expense of defending disqualification motions, says Hope Comisky at Griesing Law.

  • 6th Circ. Ruling Marks Volatile Phase For Chevron Deference

    Author Photo

    The Sixth Circuit's significant decision in Gun Owners of America v. Garland could be a step toward the demise of judicial deference to agency interpretations of statutes as it exiles the Chevron doctrine from criminal regulatory regimes, says Keith Bradley at Squire Patton.

  • 3 Cybersecurity Questions To Ask Before A Remote Mediation

    Author Photo

    Lawyers preparing to mediate or arbitrate a case through videoconference should take steps to ensure they and their alternative dispute resolution providers are employing reasonable security precautions to protect digital client data and conform to confidentiality obligations, say F. Keith Brown and Michael Koss at ADR Systems.

  • Expect Aggressive Health Care Scrutiny From Mass. US Atty

    Author Photo

    As we await a new presidentially appointed U.S. attorney for Massachusetts, health business leaders and in-house counsel should reexamine their compliance structures, as the office will likely continue to prioritize enforcement efforts against both traditional areas of focus and pandemic-related fraud, say Jack Pirozzolo and Doreen Rachal at Sidley.

  • A Uniform Mediation Act Primer As States Continue Adoption

    Author Photo

    With Georgia expected to soon become the 13th jurisdiction to adopt the Uniform Mediation Act and with more states likely to follow suit amid widespread trial delays, practitioners should familiarize themselves with the act's conflict disclosure requirements and the boundaries of its confidentiality provisions, says Richard Mason at MasonADR.

  • Safeguarding Privileged Communications In A Remote World

    Author Photo

    With the pandemic ushering in remote collaboration tools, counsel must revisit fundamentals of the attorney-client privilege and the work-product doctrine, study cases involving email and other recent technologies, and follow 10 best practices to protect confidentiality, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • Recent Rulings Reinforce DOJ's Global White Collar Reach

    Author Photo

    Recent federal court decisions allowing minimum nexus to serve as a basis for U.S. prosecution of white collar crimes occurring mainly abroad will facilitate the U.S. Department of Justice's aggressive pursuit of foreign parties when the government believes that American victims or other national interests are at stake, say Kara Brockmeyer and Douglas Zolkind at Debevoise.

  • 4 Areas Of Cyberattack Vulnerability For Law Firms

    Author Photo

    Recent data breaches involving Goodwin and Jones Day show that cyberattacks are very real threats to the legal profession, especially in the era of remote work, so law firms should revisit common business practices that expose them to unnecessary risks, says Ara Aslanian at Inverselogic.

  • Loss Amount Is Shaping PPP Fraud Prosecution Sentencing

    Author Photo

    One of the most determinative factors at sentencing for Paycheck Protection Program fraud is the loss amount, and recent cases show that defendants may have an opportunity to lower it if they can demonstrate legitimate use of any of the funds, say Sami Azhari at Azhari and Michael Leonard at Leonard Meyer.

  • How To Help Your Witnesses Overcome Hindsight Bias

    Author Photo

    Witnesses facing tricky questions from opposing counsel often find themselves engaging in hindsight bias, when they use present knowledge to second-guess past actions, but these problematic thought processes can be overcome during deposition or trial preparation through tough questions and some catharsis, says Merrie Jo Pitera at Litigation Insights.

  • NJ 'Reply All' Ethics Opinion Brings New Pitfalls For Attorneys

    Author Photo

    While a recent New Jersey ethics opinion rightly concluded that an attorney cannot claim an ethics violation when opposing counsel replies all to a group email including clients, it runs counter to stances taken by other states and presents new dangers of confidentiality breaches and unfiltered messages to opposing parties, says Roger Plawker at Pashman Stein.

  • When Gov't Contacts Lead To DC Long-Arm Jurisdiction

    Author Photo

    Recent D.C. Circuit decisions highlight that anyone doing business with U.S. government, international or quasi-governmental agencies located in Washington should evaluate whether that relationship puts them within reach of the district's long-arm statute, say Brian Young and Mary Gately at DLA Piper.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the White Collar archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!