White Collar

  • May 09, 2022

    Alleged NBA Fraud Ringleader Jailed After Bail Violation

    A retired Boston Celtics player accused of masterminding a scheme to pilfer $4 million from the National Basketball Association's health plan was sent to Brooklyn's Metropolitan Detention Center Friday after purportedly running afoul of bail conditions.

  • May 09, 2022

    Batali Groped, Kissed Woman In Boston Bar, Judge Told

    Mario Batali forcibly kissed and assaulted a young woman in a Boston bar, grabbing her breasts, buttocks and groin area, a Boston Municipal Court judge heard Monday morning during a bench trial for the celebrity chef and restaurant owner.

  • May 09, 2022

    Seller Of Racehorse PEDs In 2020 Doping Scandal Convicted

    A woman who federal prosecutors said distributed undetectable performance-enhancing drugs for professional racehorses has been convicted for her alleged role in a widespread and long-running doping scheme that rocked the sport two years ago.

  • May 09, 2022

    3rd Circ. Keeps Ex-Temple Dean Free During Fraud Appeal

    The weekend before the former dean of Temple University's business school was to report to prison and begin serving his sentence for fraudulently inflating the school's ranking by U.S. News & World Report, the Third Circuit granted his request to remain free pending an appeal over the "substantial question" of whether what he did was actually fraud.

  • May 06, 2022

    Financial Adviser Gets Sentence Trimmed In Oil Bribery Case

    A Miami financial adviser who aided a bribery scheme that funneled millions to Ecuadorian oil officials to secure contracts for a private company will be released from prison soon after a Florida federal judge on Friday agreed to shorten his sentence because of his cooperation with prosecutors.

  • May 06, 2022

    BIA Says Pa. Pot Conviction Is Grounds For Deportation

    The Board of Immigration Appeals has denied a Dominican man's bid to stay in the country, ruling that his guilty plea under Pennsylvania law for possession of marijuana, a federally controlled substance, is grounds for deportation.

  • May 06, 2022

    2 Puerto Rico Mayors Charged In Latest DOJ Bribery Offensive

    Two sitting mayors in Puerto Rico have been arrested on bribery charges, the latest local leaders ensnared in a U.S. Department of Justice crackdown on public corruption in the Caribbean commonwealth, the DOJ said Friday.

  • May 06, 2022

    Oil Tanker Cos. Face $3M In Fines For Lying About Discharges

    A Greek ship management company and a vessel owner will pay $3 million after being convicted of obstructing a Coast Guard investigation into an oil tanker's discharge of oily water into the ocean.

  • May 06, 2022

    Accountant Of 'Varsity Blues' Ringleader Wants No Prison

    The "Varsity Blues" ringleader's accountant said Friday he shouldn't serve jail time for sending invoices and keeping the books for the sprawling college admissions and test cheating operation.

  • May 06, 2022

    Donziger Says NY 'Injustices' Should Halt His DC Disbarment

    In a last-ditch effort to keep his law license, environmental attorney Steven Donziger urged the District of Columbia Court of Appeals not to disbar him based on a New York action two years ago.

  • May 06, 2022

    Crypto Mining Corp. CEO Indicted In $62M Fraud Scheme

    A crypto mining promoter shafted investors out of $62 million in a yearslong scheme that was all glitter and no gold, according to twin criminal and civil cases the federal government announced Friday.

  • May 06, 2022

    SEC Fines Nvidia $5.5M Over Crypto Mining Disclosures

    Computing company Nvidia will pay $5.5 million to settle U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission allegations that the company didn't adequately disclose the effects of cryptocurrency mining on its business, according to settlement documents dated Friday.

  • May 06, 2022

    Imprisoned Avenatti Faces Summer Retrial On Fraud Charges

    With suspended attorney Michael Avenatti calling in from prison, a California federal judge on Friday set his retrial date on wire fraud charges for July, while acknowledging that logistical concerns around transporting the incarcerated lawyer could push the date.

  • May 06, 2022

    Beltway Moves: Sidley, Kirkland, Williams & Connolly

    Sidley Austin LLP, Hogan Lovells, Kirkland & Ellis LLP and McDermott Will & Emery LLP made big investments in their Washington, D.C., offices in recent weeks, demonstrating that BigLaw firms continue their push to solidify capabilities in areas like cybersecurity and financial services.

  • May 06, 2022

    Jury Clears Ex-Nomura Trader, Rejects SEC No-Lying Theory

    A Manhattan federal jury on Friday cleared a former Nomura trader of fraud over lies he told to counterparties in the commercial bond market, rejecting the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's theory that traders must adhere strictly to factual statements.

  • May 06, 2022

    Hemp Farm Says Cop's Marijuana Raid Based On False Info

    A Wyoming hemp farmer is suing the state and one of its police officers, alleging that the officer conducted an armed raid looking for marijuana based on flimsy pretext and falsified reports.

  • May 06, 2022

    Retired Mass. Judge, Ex-US Attys Back 'Varsity Blues' Appeal

    A private equity executive convicted in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions case has received the backing of a trio of Massachusetts legal heavyweights, with a former federal judge and two former Bay State U.S. attorneys telling the First Circuit his guilty verdict should be reversed.

  • May 06, 2022

    NYC Atty Kossoff Gets Up To 13½ Years For Stealing $14.6M

    Former New York City real estate attorney Mitchell Kossoff was sentenced to up to 13½ years in prison Friday after pleading guilty to stealing more than $14.6 million from at least 35 individual and business clients.

  • May 05, 2022

    Ex-Pharma CEO To Pay $56K To Settle Insider Trading Case

    The former CEO of Auspex Pharmaceuticals Inc. will pay just over $56,000 to end both a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission suit and a related criminal case against him over insider trading accusations that he tipped off his inner circle ahead of his company's $3.2 billion acquisition by Teva.

  • May 05, 2022

    Prof. Cleared Of Fraud In China Case, But Is Hit Over Taxes

    An Illinois math professor was acquitted Wednesday of grant fraud charges stemming from a Trump-era program to combat trade secret theft, but he was convicted on tax charges related to a Chinese bank account he controlled.

  • May 05, 2022

    Conspiracy Theorists Must Supply Docs In Voter Robocall Suit

    A New York federal judge granted The National Coalition on Black Civic Participation's request for discovery in a suit alleging that conservative conspiracy theorists Jacob Wohl and Jack Burkman sent "threatening" robocalls aimed at misleading Black voters ahead of the 2020 presidential election.

  • May 05, 2022

    Feds Defend Biglari's $1.3M Penalty Over Cracker Barrel Stock

    The Federal Trade Commission has defended a recent agreement allowing Biglari Holdings Inc. to pay a $1.3 million penalty to escape claims that it flouted federal law by buying two batches of Cracker Barrel Old Country Store stock without properly notifying the agency.

  • May 05, 2022

    No Early Release For Agent Convicted Of Smuggling Players

    A former sports agent convicted for his role in a multimillion-dollar scheme to smuggle Cuban baseball players into the U.S. will need to finish his three-year term of supervised release after a Florida federal judge denied his request to end his punishment 11 months early.

  • May 05, 2022

    Ill. Atty In Contempt For Taking Items From Foreclosed Condo

    An Illinois attorney was held in civil contempt Thursday and ordered to pay $150,000 to help restore his former Chicago condo to the condition it was in when the court allowed foreclosure of the property, after the federal government claimed he "took everything including the kitchen sink" to evade its attempt to collect unpaid taxes.

  • May 05, 2022

    Jury Mulls If Ex-Nomura Trader's Fibs Amounted To Fraud

    A Manhattan federal jury on Thursday weighed the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's fraud case targeting former Nomura bond trader James Im, wrestling with whether his admitted lies were willful lawbreaking or merely less-than-honest but routine market conduct.

Expert Analysis

  • BitMEX BSA Case Raises Key Crypto Questions

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    In U.S. v. Hayes, a New York federal court's recently denied motion to dismiss in the Bank Secrecy Act case against BitMEX points to the regulatory uncertainty surrounding cryptocurrencies, which could help the remaining defendant prove he could not have known the exchange needed to register as a futures commission merchant, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Attorneys Today Need To Depose Like There's No Tomorrow

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    With people leaving the workforce in droves amid the “Great Resignation” and with younger workers less inclined to stay in one place for long, attorneys need to adjust their deposition strategies to minimize risks of losing crucial witnesses who may move on from a client or opponent company before a case goes to trial, say Anthony Argiropoulos and Maximilian Cadmus at Epstein Becker.

  • Parsing Recent DOJ Statements On Monopolistic Conduct

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    Andre Geverola and Javier Ortega at Arnold & Porter provide context for the U.S. Justice Department's recent statements on enforcement against monopolistic conduct, as well as guidance on how the DOJ is likely to focus its attention moving forward.

  • What To Look For As Musk's Twitter Battle With SEC Plays Out

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    In light of a new subpoena in the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's protracted war over Tesla CEO Elon Musk's tweeting habits, the company and Musk could face steep fines or sanctions, including his removal as an officer of any publicly traded company for his bad-boy behaviors, says Christopher Warren at Warren Law.

  • How DC Federal Court Ruling Limits Wire Fraud Act Scope

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    The recent D.C. federal court decision U.S. v. Guertin, holding that a scheme to maintain a preexisting salary does not constitute obtaining money or property under the wire fraud statute, reinforces the act's textual limitations and curbs prosecutorial overreach, say Ashwin Ram and Galen Kast at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • How Attorneys Can Ethically Terminate A Client Relationship

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    As illustrated by Dentons’ recent request to withdraw from its representation of a casino mogul in Bartlit Beck v. Okada, terminating client relationships prematurely can be tricky and met with skepticism in the courts, but following certain best practices can make the process a little less painful for everyone involved, says Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight.

  • When Presuit Demands Cross The Line To Extortion

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    A California appellate court’s recent decision in Falcon Brands v. Mousavi & Lee clarifies the difference between aggressive settlement posturing and criminal extortion, reminding attorneys to be careful not to threaten adverse actions unrelated to a client's allegations when making prelitigation monetary demands, say attorneys at Michelman & Robinson.

  • Perspectives

    Justice Reforms Call For Quick Action To Fill US Atty Spots

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    U.S. attorneys play an important role in transforming the criminal legal system for several reasons, and they can restore integrity and independence to the U.S. Department of Justice, so President Joe Biden and Congress must move quickly to fill the remaining two-thirds of the top prosecutor seats, says Derick Dailey at Davis + Gilbert.

  • The Key To Turning Solid Briefs Into Winning Briefs

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    Even a well-written brief can omit key facts, make tone-deaf legal arguments or ignore practical implications, so lawyers drafting motions and appeals should incorporate feedback processes akin to moot courts and jury research, says Andrew Nichols at Charis Lex.

  • What's At Stake In Doctors' Opioid Liability Case In High Court

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's review of Ruan v. U.S., which is scheduled for oral argument on Tuesday, will likely clarify the extent to which the good faith standard can protect doctors from criminal liability in the context of prescribing opioids, say Lindsay Gerdes and Madeline Pinto at Dinsmore.

  • How CCO Framework Could Have Altered FINRA Charges

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    Brian Rubin at Eversheds Sutherland examines how the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority’s decision earlier this month to sanction a broker-dealer's anti-money laundering chief compliance officer may have differed had regulators applied the National Society of Compliance Professionals' recently proposed liability framework.

  • Steps For Universities As DOJ Shifts Foreign Influence Policy

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    Notwithstanding Wednesday's U.S. Department of Justice announcement terminating the initiative targeting Chinese influence and raising the bar for criminal prosecutions, universities should ensure their compliance controls meet new disclosure standards and that they can efficiently respond to inquiries about employees' foreign connections, say attorneys at Covington.

  • How Health Care Cos. Can Prepare For DOJ's Cyberfraud Push

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    Enforcement of the U.S. Department of Justice’s new cyberfraud initiative will initially occur largely through civil investigations that broadly apply the False Claims Act, so health care organizations should ensure that their practices can withstand hacks, whistleblowers and government scrutiny, say Katie McDermott and Mark Krotoski at Morgan Lewis.

  • Walter Dellinger's Little-Known, Outsize Impact On Legal Aid

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    The late Walter Dellinger’s pro bono work distinguishes him forever, but his greatest moment involved a little-known U.S. Supreme Court case, Brown v. Legal Foundation of Washington, which helped preserve one of the largest sources of legal aid funding — and Dellinger’s arguments were as magical as the program he helped save, says David Lash at O'Melveny.

  • DOJ Unlikely To Charge Trump For Taking Top Secret Docs

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    Former President Donald Trump may have violated the Espionage Act by allegedly bringing classified documents to Mar-a-Lago, but past cases show that he will probably not be prosecuted, depending on the facts, declassification powers, politics and, most importantly, intent, says Daren Firestone at Levy Firestone.

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