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White Collar

  • June 6, 2019

    Ex-Arizona Basketball Coach Gets 3 Months In Bribe Scheme

    A onetime basketball coach for the University of Arizona was sentenced Thursday in New York federal court to three months in prison for accepting $20,000 in bribes in exchange for steering young athletes to a sports agent, the first prison term for a coach in the scandal.

  • June 6, 2019

    Don't Suppress Our Evidence, Feds Say In Centra Tech Case

    Prosecutors asked a New York federal judge Wednesday to put an end to the crusade by a co-founder of the shuttered cryptocurrency company Centra Tech to suppress evidence seized during his arrest.

  • June 6, 2019

    Insys Chairman To Resign In Wake Of $225M Deal With Feds

    Insys Therapeutics Inc. Chairman Steven Meyer will leave the post he’s held since 2017, along with fellow board member Pierre Lapalme, the company said in a regulatory filing Thursday morning, a day after the drugmaker ended an opioid bribe investigation with the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • June 6, 2019

    Autonomy Founder Not Fit For Role, Ex-HP Exec Says At Trial

    Former HP chief executive Meg Whitman told a fraud trial in London on Thursday that the technology giant’s $11 billion acquisition of Autonomy deteriorated because the founder of the British software firm could not cope in a larger corporate environment.

  • June 6, 2019

    5 Banks Fined $91M Over Forex-Rigging Claims

    Five major banks including JP Morgan and Barclays have been fined almost 90 million Swiss francs ($91 million) for allegedly colluding to manipulate trading in foreign exchange markets, Switzerland's antitrust authority said Thursday, bringing the total penalties imposed on the lenders for competition violations to nearly $1.3 billion.

  • June 5, 2019

    Calif. Fund Says It Lost $4.6M In Fraudulent Bitcoin Deal

    A San Francisco investment fund claiming con artists snookered it into a deal to buy bitcoins from a supposed Russian oligarch has sued a New York woman who allegedly represented the oligarch, seeking to recover $4.6 million the fund says remains stolen in the scam.

  • June 5, 2019

    NJ Pols Pan 'Sloppy' Legal Advice In Campaign Rape Probe

    New Jersey lawmakers who investigated how an accused rapist got a high-ranking job in Gov. Phil Murphy's administration slammed an attorney's "sloppy" purported legal advice to keep the allegations confidential, saying Wednesday it kept the incoming Democratic governor in the dark about a serious accusation to which he was privy.

  • June 5, 2019

    5-Nation Tax Crime Group Cites Progress In Joint Crackdown

    The heads of a five-nation group that’s cracking down on transnational tax crimes said Wednesday that their first year of collaboration has sparked new cases and sped development of existing ones but hasn’t yet led to a prosecution.

  • June 5, 2019

    Insys To Pay $225M To End DOJ's Opioid Scheme Probe

    Insys Therapeutics has agreed to a $225 million global settlement to end criminal and civil investigations by the federal government tied to allegations the pharmaceutical company bribed doctors to prescribe a powerful and addictive opioid spray, the U.S. Department of Justice said Wednesday.

  • June 5, 2019

    Longfin CEO Charged In $66M Bogus Revenue Scheme

    Federal prosecutors in New Jersey and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Wednesday accused the founder and CEO of financial technology firm Longfin Corp. of duping potential investors by publicly reporting more than $66 million in sham revenue.

  • June 5, 2019

    Two La. Enviro Researchers Charged With Trade Secret Theft

    Two former water research institute employees allegedly tried to steal software worth millions that allowed the organization to model how the Mississippi delta's environment would change, according to a Louisiana federal court indictment unsealed Tuesday.

  • June 5, 2019

    FCC Thinks Ex-Bank Fraudster Controls Radio Station Group

    A convicted bank fraudster appears to be behind an enterprise that was used to buy several radio stations, a serious potential violation of federal licensing rules that could put the stations' owner at risk of losing their licenses, the Federal Communications Commission said.

  • June 5, 2019

    'Honest' Fund Boss Tells Jury Ex-Employees Out To Get Him

    Premium Point Investments boss Anilesh "Neil" Ahuja is an honest leader who is being framed by his former underlings, the wealthy investment pro's lawyer told a Manhattan jury Wednesday, rejecting charges that he led a $100 million criminal fraud at his now-bankrupt hedge fund.

  • June 5, 2019

    Jury Orders €18M Clawback From Real Estate Tycoon's Wife

    A Connecticut federal jury has ordered the wife of an Irish real estate developer to repay more than €18 million ($20.2 million) in assets and cash that her husband fraudulently transferred to her around the time of his bankruptcy, including a €14 million property that changed hands on the same day the bankruptcy papers were filed.

  • June 5, 2019

    Revolving-Door Roundup: Paul Weiss, Davis Polk, Jones Day

    The month of May saw some high-profile ex-government players return to the BigLaw ranks, including a former attorney general now at Paul Weiss, a well-known ex-prosecutor who worked with Robert Mueller, and veteran enforcement attorneys around the country.

  • June 5, 2019

    Mintz Hires State Street Anti-Money-Laundering Exec

    Mintz Levin has hired a State Street anti-money-laundering executive and former federal prosecutor for its compliance, white collar, investigations and enforcement practices in Boston.

  • June 5, 2019

    Gov't Fights Whistleblower's Bid For Piece Of $3.27M Deal

    A relator who has filed multiple qui tam complaints over health care fraud committed by a Michigan doctor is not entitled to a share of the $3.27 million settlement reached between a government agency and the hospital where he practiced, the government has told a federal court.

  • June 5, 2019

    CEO Of Defunct IT Firm Gets 5 Years For $2.8M Fraud Scheme

    The former CEO of a now-bankrupt Illinois information technology firm was sentenced Wednesday to five years in prison for his role in a scheme to steal more than $2.8 million from the company.

  • June 5, 2019

    Rare White Collar Psych Eval Sought In Bitcoin Scheme Case

    Lawyers for a man charged with participating in an unidentified website’s multimillion-dollar scheme to swap bitcoins for personal payment card information took the rare step Wednesday of asking for a psychiatric evaluation of their client, saying he is showing signs of instability.

  • June 5, 2019

    Feds Left Employer In Dark About Embezzler's Past, Suit Says

    A Massachusetts event-planning company said it had no idea its part-time bookkeeper, who was allegedly embezzling money from the company, had previously been indicted and sentenced to prison for doing the same thing to a past employer, the company said Tuesday in a lawsuit against the federal government.

  • June 5, 2019

    Iranian Exported Aircraft Parts Despite Sanctions, Gov't Says

    Federal prosecutors on Tuesday unsealed charges against an Iranian man who allegedly exported and sold U.S.-made aircraft parts to Iranian airlines, including one with ties to Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, which the Trump administration recently labeled a terrorist group.

  • June 5, 2019

    Prosecutors Say Ex-UBS Officer, Trader Lied About Meetup

    A former UBS compliance officer and a trader have lied about meeting up on a night the officer purportedly gave the trader insider information despite cellphone tower evidence suggesting they were together, a prosecutor for the Financial Conduct Authority told a London jury Wednesday.

  • June 5, 2019

    Ex-USC Basketball Coach Avoids Prison For Taking Bribes

    A Manhattan federal judge on Wednesday allowed a former University of Southern California assistant men's basketball coach to avoid prison time for taking bribes from financial advisers in exchange for directing athletes to retain their services.

  • June 5, 2019

    Autonomy Fraud Led To Blame Game At HP, Whitman Testifies

    Bosses at Hewlett Packard tried to shift the blame for the company's disastrous $11 billion takeover of Autonomy after uncovering evidence that the British software company's bosses fraudulently pumped up its revenues before the deal, former HP chief executive Meg Whitman testified Wednesday.

  • June 4, 2019

    Platinum Oil Co. Exec Tells Jury Of Downward Spiral

    The founder of Northstar Offshore Group LLC on Tuesday told a New York federal jury of how the Texas oil and gas company took a downward turn after being taken over by Platinum Partners, and of his dim view of the value of certain assets in the hedge fund manager's energy portfolio.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Limiting Supreme Court's Size Is Not Enough

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    The proposal by Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., for a constitutionally mandated nine-justice U.S. Supreme Court does not address any of the well-known problems with the current system — problems that could be solved through a nonpartisan package of reforms, says Gordon Renneisen of Cornerstone Law Group.

  • Clarifications Needed After DOJ's New FCPA Policy

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's recent revisions to its Foreign Corrupt Practices Act corporate enforcement policy fall short of answering several key cooperation questions faced by companies, say attorneys with Crowell & Moring LLP.

  • How Data Analytics Can Weed Out College Admissions Fraud

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    As colleges and standardized test providers scramble to assess years of records following the “Operation Varsity Blues” admissions scandal, examining data patterns in those files might help expose signs of misconduct, say Michael Costa and Jonny Frank of StoneTurn Group LLP.

  • US Policy On Cuba Litigation Comes With Risks For Cos.

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    A newly effective embargo measure that allows U.S. claimants to sue the Cuban government in U.S. courts for confiscated Cuban property may soon be expanded to permit lawsuits against non-Cuban entities operating in Cuba. Attorneys at Greenberg Traurig LLP discuss key issues surrounding the policy change.

  • Assessing Compliance Risk Under DOJ China Initiative

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's China Initiative should be a signal to Chinese companies, multinational companies with Chinese subsidiaries, and U.S.-based investors in Chinese companies — it's time to design and implement strong anti-corruption and anti-bribery programs, says Jean Chow-Callam of FTI Consulting Inc.

  • Lenders Score Major High Court Victory In Foreclosure Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous ruling on Wednesday in Obduskey v. McCarthy & Holthus LLP removes nearly all activities taken by creditors seeking nonjudicial foreclosure of liens and mortgages from the ambit of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, says John Baxter of Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP.

  • Tech Trends From SXSW Pose Unique Questions For Lawyers

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    These days, a popular theme in media is that lawyers' jobs will be taken by robots. However, based on the tech issues discussed at the South by Southwest technology conference in Austin, Texas, last month, robots may in fact need lawyers, says Nick Abrahams of Norton Rose Fulbright.

  • How Per Se Rule Will Die In Criminal Antitrust Cases

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    When the issue of the per se rule for criminal Sherman Act trials reaches the U.S. Supreme Court in the near future, the justices will take different approaches, but the rule will fall, says former federal prosecutor Robert Connolly.

  • Liability For CEO Misconduct Expands After #MeToo

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    The Nevada Gaming Commission's recent $20 million fine against Wynn Resorts for failing to act after reports of its former CEO's alleged sexual misconduct demonstrates how #MeToo has altered the classic economic assessment for harassment claims, says Dove Burns of Obermayer Rebmann Maxwell & Hippel LLP.

  • In Bar Admissions Process, It's Candor Or Bust

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    You passed the bar exam and are ready for the character and fitness committee interview. Time to think about how to discuss that minor incident in college, that misdemeanor in high school or that mental health issue that you have totally under control, says Richard Maltz of Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz PC.

  • DOJ's Wire Act Opinion Means Uncertainty For Tribal Gaming

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    While tribes may be split on the U.S. Department of Justice's new interpretation of the Wire Act, they should all note the DOJ's willingness to weigh in on otherwise established gaming laws, say Charles Galbraith and Julian SpearChief-Morris of Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP.

  • Compliance Homework For Schools After 'Varsity Blues'

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    With last week's news of an undergraduate admissions bribery scandal, all of higher education in America is on notice. Colleges and universities should meet this new challenge by implementing best practices from the world of corporate compliance, say Brandon Essig and Brian Kappel of Lightfoot Franklin & White LLC.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Bashant Reviews 'Doing Justice'

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    My initial reaction to "Doing Justice" was that author Preet Bharara may have bitten off more than he could chew — an accusation leveled against him when he served as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York — but I found the book full of helpful gems, says U.S. District Judge Cynthia Bashant of the Southern District of California.

  • Firms Can Leverage Communications When Economy Is Slow

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    Though most experts believe that an imminent recession is unlikely, slowdown fears are increasing. Now is the time for firms to consider how to best leverage their communications and marketing teams to lessen impacts from a potential economic slowdown, says Tom Orewyler of Tom Orewyler Communications LLC.

  • An Emerging Road Map For FCPA Compliance, Cooperation

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    Enforcement of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act has firmly entered a new era of transparency under U.S. Department of Justice Assistant Attorney General Brian Benczkowski, says Kevin Feldis of Perkins Coie LLP.

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