White Collar

  • May 16, 2020

    Shkreli Release Denied After 'Delusional' Virus Cure Boast

    A Brooklyn federal judge on Saturday rejected fraudster Martin Shkreli's bid for release from prison, finding there are no reported COVID-19 cases at the Pennsylvania facility where he is serving time and citing a government assessment that dismisses as "delusional" his boast that he can cure the deadly virus.

  • May 15, 2020

    2nd Circ. Asks If Bridgegate Impacts College Hoops Appeal

    The Second Circuit wants to know whether the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to throw out the convictions of two former New Jersey officials for the "Bridgegate" scandal after it found that prosecutors stretched federal fraud law too far impacts the convictions from the college basketball corruption probe under appeal.

  • May 15, 2020

    Adam Skelos Can't Get COVID-19 Release After Dad Sprung

    A New York federal judge on Friday refused to release Adam Skelos from prison due to COVID-19 after releasing his elderly father, former state lawmaker Dean Skelos, when he contracted the deadly virus, saying the younger Skelos is at "relatively low risk" for illness complications.

  • May 15, 2020

    NJ Strikes $1M Deal Over Staffer's Rape Claims Against Atty

    A staffer in New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy's administration has notched a $1 million settlement in her suit alleging the state and the Murphy campaign mishandled claims that a lawyer who worked on the campaign raped her, with most of the funds earmarked for a charity to benefit sexual assault survivors, the parties said Friday.

  • May 15, 2020

    3 Ill. Men Charged With Pilfering $5.3M From Auto Lender

    Two top officers of an Illinois subprime auto lending company and an accountant they worked with funneled $5.3 million from the company to a shell company by selling GPS devices at significant markups and collecting commissions on vehicle warranties they weren't entitled to, federal prosecutors said Friday.

  • May 15, 2020

    Feds Slam Ex-Fox Exec's Bid To Nix FIFA Bribery Case

    Brooklyn prosecutors hit back hard on Friday against a former 21st Century Fox marketing executive's bid to dismiss the soccer-related bribery charges against him by arguing that a grand jury may not have reached a quorum when it indicted him, calling the suggestion "absurd," "nonsensical" and "frivolous."

  • May 15, 2020

    DC Circ. Says Gitmo Detainee's Due Process Claim Too Broad

    The D.C. Circuit has rejected a Guantanamo Bay prisoner's bid for freedom under the Constitution's due process clause, saying Friday his broad argument was blocked by precedent but narrower due process arguments by Guantanamo detainees might be allowed.

  • May 15, 2020

    Ex-Shook Hardy Trial Lawyer Joins Eckert Seamans In Pa.

    A former federal prosecutor and trial attorney from Shook Hardy & Bacon has joined Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott LLC in its Philadelphia office, with plans to take advantage of the firm's capabilities and visibility to grow her work around the region.

  • May 15, 2020

    Health Hires: Polsinelli, DLA Piper, Eckert Seamans

    Polsinelli nabbed health care attorneys in Seattle and Los Angeles, DLA Piper scooped up a former Baker Donelson shareholder in D.C., and Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott LLC poached a trial attorney from Shook Hardy & Bacon, headlining Law360's latest roundup of personnel moves in the health care and life sciences arena.

  • May 15, 2020

    Ponzi Schemer Wants Out Of Prison Over Virus Risk

    The mastermind behind a $54 million Ponzi scheme is urging a Pennsylvania federal judge to free him from his 22-year prison sentence due to the heightened risk he faces from a potential COVID-19 infection as a result of his weight and an underlying seizure disorder.

  • May 15, 2020

    Manafort's Release Helps Spring Ex-NFL Lineman From Prison

    Citing the compassionate release of former Donald Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, a federal judge said Friday that a former NFL lineman should be able to serve the rest of his prison sentence for a $2.5 million real estate fraud scheme in home confinement to protect him from COVID-19.

  • May 15, 2020

    COVID-19 IP Catch-Up: Source Code Woes, Generic Antivirals

    The Federal Circuit will continue to hold remote oral arguments into the summer, Gilead is allowing some generic-drug makers to produce versions of its antiviral treatment remdesivir, and companies that are allegedly upcharging for coronavirus-related products are continuing to find themselves in court for trademark law violations.

  • May 15, 2020

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen Venezuela's central bank drag England's into court following months of rumored disputes over gold reserves, an offshore tax consultant renew a fraud claim over consultant fees against an investment manager, and consumers sue the likes of Mercedes-Benz amid growing claims over a massive emissions scandal. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • May 14, 2020

    WilmerHale, Toyota Agent Hit By Atty's $20M Virus Countersuit

    An attorney accused of extorting WilmerHale, Toyota and a staffing agency fired back with counterclaims on Wednesday, slapping the agency with a litany of claims including whistleblower retaliation for allegedly firing him after he reported concerns about COVID-19 in his New York City office.

  • May 14, 2020

    Ex-UAW Head Denies Charges Of Looting Union Cash

    United Auto Workers' ousted president Gary Jones pled not guilty in Michigan federal court Thursday to charges stemming from claims that he conspired to embezzle more than $1 million in union money to spend on expensive cigars, top-shelf booze and pricey getaways.

  • May 14, 2020

    Sotomayor Says Prisons May Be 'Cautionary Tales' Amid Virus

    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor warned Thursday against prisons becoming "cautionary tales" amid the COVID-19 pandemic, after Justice Samuel Alito shot down a bid by a group of Texas prisoners seeking to enforce a lower court's order on their facility's virus protection policies.

  • May 14, 2020

    Meet The Debevoise Partner Set To Fight DOJ's Flynn Flip

    Retired New York federal judge and Debevoise & Plimpton partner John Gleeson emerged this week as a key figure in the criminal case against former Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn after a D.C. federal judge tapped him to serve as amicus curiae and explore a perjury charge against Flynn.

  • May 14, 2020

    No Early Exit For $158M Medicare Fraudster Amid COVID-19

    A Texas federal judge denied a request for compassionate release of a Houston psychiatrist serving a 12-year prison sentence for her role in a $158 million Medicare fraud scheme, ruling Thursday that the bid stems from a "generalized fear of contracting COVID-19" while lacking any "extraordinary and compelling reason."

  • May 14, 2020

    Texas Dentist Owes $9M For Fraudulent Medicaid Billings

    A Dallas-area dentist owes about $10.8 million plus interest for fraudulently billing Medicaid for certain services, a Texas state judge found, an amount that's significantly less than the $20.1 million the attorney general's office had argued should be handed over.

  • May 14, 2020

    Conn. Man Ran $2M Liquid Purification Tech Scam, SEC Says

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission accused a disbarred attorney of securities fraud Thursday for allegedly collecting $2 million from investors while misleading them about the capabilities of a new liquid purification technology.

  • May 14, 2020

    Release Unlikely For Virus-Fearing Brooklyn Inmates, For Now

    A New York federal judge on Thursday expressed skepticism about releasing inmates who claim a Brooklyn prison is keeping them in unconstitutionally unsafe conditions amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • May 14, 2020

    Ex-Cargo Exec Gets Early Release From Price-Fixing Sentence

    A Georgia federal court has agreed to reduce the prison sentence and release a former air cargo executive who pled guilty to price-fixing charges this year after spending nearly a decade as a fugitive from U.S. authorities, citing risks posed by COVID-19.

  • May 14, 2020

    Investor Class Wins Cert. In Longfin Securities Suit

    Investors in shuttered cryptocurrency company Longfin Corp. won class certification in New York federal court on Thursday in their securities fraud class action, allowing the shareholders to move forward with their request for default judgment against the company and three related individuals.

  • May 14, 2020

    LA Real Estate Figure To Plead Guilty To Bribing City Leaders

    A real estate consultant has agreed to plead guilty to a federal racketeering charge for participating in a "pay-to-play" scheme in which Los Angeles City Hall leaders and a member of the City Council were allegedly bribed by developers to help get their projects approved, federal prosecutors announced Wednesday.

  • May 14, 2020

    Ex-Bumble Bee CEO Looks To Avoid Jail Amid COVID-19

    The former Bumble Bee CEO facing up to a decade behind bars for fixing tuna prices has asked for just one year of home confinement, saying prison presents "a real and tangible threat to his life" amid the global pandemic.

Expert Analysis

  • How Lawyers Can Find Equanimity In Crisis

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    Lawyers navigating the COVID-19 fallout may think they no longer have time for the “soft” aspects of their work — such as being an outlet for clients' stress — but maintaining equanimity and focusing on the human aspects of lawyering are key to weathering the crisis, say Meredith Parfet and Aaron Solomon at Ravenyard Group.

  • Anticipate Gov't Subpoenas Of Your Zoom Recordings

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    The speed with which the government is subpoenaing Zoom video recordings in investigations during the pandemic demands that companies develop policies that permit employees to use this critical technology while also protecting corporate interests, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Opinion

    Courts Should Look To 3 Bar Exam Alternatives During Crisis

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    While the pandemic delays bar exams, jurisdictions should adopt other ways to license new lawyers, as sticking to the status quo would abdicate our profession’s responsibility to meet the public’s legal needs, say law professors Deborah Jones Merritt, Marsha Griggs and Patricia Salkin.

  • The Road Back To Business As Usual: 12 Steps For Cos.

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    It is not too early for in-house counsel, compliance personnel and senior management to start planning for the end of the pandemic, and lessons from previous crises can guide management of the various enforcement and litigation risks in the new normal, say attorneys at White & Case.

  • South Korean Bank's AML Penalties Offer Cautionary Tale

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    Federal and New York State regulators' settlements this week over anti-money laundering allegations at the Industrial Bank of Korea demonstrate the risks of neglecting internal compliance functions at banks, say John Curran and Daniel Chirlin at Walden Macht.

  • Mitigating Fraud Risk During COVID-19 Crisis

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    As the U.S. prepares to provide $2.2 trillion in financial relief under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, enhanced corporate controls with respect to reporting financial performance, material nonpublic information and government communications are crucial to ensure compliance and allay fraud risk, say attorneys at White & Case.

  • Are Litigation Funding Documents Protected From Discovery?

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    With law firms and their clients increasingly interested in exploring litigation funding during the current economic crisis, attorneys must be aware of the trends emerging in courts across the country regarding the discoverability of litigation funding materials, say attorneys at Jenner & Block and Longford Capital.

  • Don't Get Blindsided By Correspondent Banking Enforcement

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    Attorneys at Mayer Brown share guidance on mitigating correspondent banking risks for financial institutions as COVID-19 market disruptions are likely to prompt an increase in financial crime and misconduct.

  • Virus-Prompted Market Volatility May Expose Fraud Schemes

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    As the economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic hasten the end of an 11-year bull market, the downturn could expose new fraud schemes as investors seek liquidity, just as prior financial crises laid bare the likes of Bernie Madoff and Enron, say managing directors at AlixPartners.

  • How COVID-19 Might Uproot Centuries Of Litigation Traditions

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    Litigation has historically been an in-person activity, but the COVID-19 crisis might bring a long-lasting shift toward adoption of technologies that allow discovery and other litigation activities to proceed in a manner that preserves social distancing, say Elisabeth Ross and Christopher Hennessy at Cozen O’Connor.

  • Nursing Homes Must Prepare For Risk Of FCA Liability

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    The U.S. Department of Justice is ramping up its scrutiny of nursing homes and other extended care facilities due to COVID-19, and it is critically important that the companies operating those facilities understand the False Claims Act and related federal criminal laws the government will use for enforcement, says Valarie Hays at Riley Safer.

  • Consider Legal Ramifications Before Recording Video Calls

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    Given the ease with which videoconference participants can unwittingly risk civil and criminal liability by unlawfully recording calls, attorneys should be mindful of — and clients may appreciate prospective advice on — state consent laws and the various meeting platforms' consent features, say Daniel Rozansky and Crystal Jonelis at Stubbs Alderton.

  • Aviation Watch: The Uncertain Future Of The 737 Max

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    A year after the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302, the future of Boeing's still-grounded 737 Max airliner lies in the hands of the Federal Aviation Administration — and the agency's decisions may be strongly influenced by political and economic considerations, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • How To Combat IP-Facilitated Digital Fraud During Pandemic

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    When your intellectual property is being used to facilitate digital fraud during the pandemic, engaging in a multifaceted response involving law enforcement, the internet service provider and the courts is of paramount importance to protect consumers and mitigate erosion of brand value, say Joshua Reisberg and Angelina Whitfield at Axinn.

  • Perspectives

    Inmate Release Exhaustion Rule Should Be Waived For COVID

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    The issue at the forefront of many compassionate release applications during the pandemic has been whether federal courts must wait 30 days before they can rule on them due to the statutory administrative exhaustion requirement, and those 30 days could become a matter of life or death, says Jolene LaVigne-Albert at Schlam Stone.

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