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White Collar

  • June 4, 2019

    Barnes & Thornburg Hires 2 Former Prosecutors In San Diego

    Barnes & Thornburg LLP has beefed up its litigation department and white collar and investigations practice on the West Coast, adding two former federal prosecutors to its San Diego office with extensive experience conducting government investigations and going after high-profile white collar criminals.

  • June 4, 2019

    Ex-HHS Watchdog Says Anti-Fraud Revamp Going Too Slowly

    Days after his resignation, the longest-serving inspector general ever at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services tells Law360 he understands the frustration at how slowly his office has altered its anti-fraud oversight in response to colossal changes in health care delivery.

  • June 4, 2019

    Frat Brother Agrees To SEC Asset Freeze Over Ponzi Scheme

    A recent University of Georgia graduate accused of running a $269,000 Ponzi scheme from his fraternity house agreed to have his assets frozen by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, according to a consent order approved by a Georgia federal judge Tuesday.

  • June 4, 2019

    Former Credit Union CEO Gets 5½ Years For Embezzling $10M

    A Manhattan federal judge hit former Municipal Credit Union CEO Kam Wong with a 5½-year prison sentence Tuesday for pilfering nearly $10 million, saying the defendant's actions hurt the lender's blue-collar clientele.

  • June 4, 2019

    SEC Opposes Case Delay For Firms Tied To $165M Fraud

    The companies that a British broker is accused of using to cover up his $165 million global pump-and-dump scheme should not be allowed to pause a civil suit while the suspected fraudster's criminal case moves forward, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission said Tuesday.

  • June 4, 2019

    Calif. Man Guilty In $5.7M Scheme To Crowdfund Laptops

    A Chicago federal jury has convicted a California man of fraudulently soliciting $5.7 million, including on a crowdfunding website, in investments for novel dual-screen and foldable laptops that never materialized.

  • June 4, 2019

    Ex-Penn State GC To Face High Court Disciplinary Hearing

    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court took the rare step on Monday of ordering oral arguments over whether Penn State University's former general counsel should face discipline regarding her dual representation of the school and three top administrators who went on to face charges related to the Jerry Sandusky sex abuse scandal.

  • June 4, 2019

    Extell Founder Accused Of Cheating Investor In EB-5 Scheme

    The founder of Extell Development Co. has been called into court in New York over $65 million in claims that he defrauded a former member with an ownership stake in the company’s EB-5 regional center.

  • June 4, 2019

    Rio Tinto Dodges Investor Suit Over Mozambique Coal Fraud

    Rio Tinto dodged an investor suit over a Mozambican mining project on Monday after a New York federal judge found that all of the mining giant's allegedly misleading statements were either made more than five years before the suit was filed or were insufficient to prove malfeasance.

  • June 4, 2019

    Trader Gave Ex-UBS Officer 'Glamorous' Life, Jury Hears

    A trader accused of betting on insider information from a former UBS compliance officer gave her access to his "glamorous" world, a prosecutor for the Financial Conduct Authority told a London jury Tuesday.

  • June 4, 2019

    Chicago Pol Pleads Not Guilty To Public Corruption Charges

    Chicago Alderman Edward Burke and two co-defendants indicted for an alleged scheme to trade Burke's considerable political clout for private tax work pled not guilty Tuesday to the government's racketeering, bribery and extortion charges.

  • June 4, 2019

    Cops Cite Judge's Link To Exoneration Group In Recusal Bid

    An Illinois town and a group of officials and police officers have asked a federal judge to step aside from a former prosecutor’s lawsuit alleging local police and prosecutors framed him for his wife’s murder, saying the judge’s daughter’s new job with the Exoneration Project creates an appearance of bias.

  • June 4, 2019

    Trump Squeezes Cuba With New Travel Restrictions

    The White House rolled out a new set of restrictions against Cuba on Tuesday by effectively outlawing most educational travel to the island as part of its broader effort to reverse the Obama administration's policy of loosening sanctions on Havana.

  • June 4, 2019

    Swedish Court Rejects Request To Arrest Julian Assange

    A Swedish court has rejected a request to detain Julian Assange over a rape allegation, a decision which could ease efforts to extradite the WikiLeaks founder to the U.S to face conspiracy charges for leaking classified documents.

  • June 3, 2019

    DOJ's View That Wire Act Applies Beyond Sports Betting KO'd

    A New Hampshire federal judge on Monday set aside a recent U.S. Department of Justice reinterpretation of the Wire Act to apply beyond sports gambling in a closely watched challenge by the New Hampshire Lottery Commission and lottery vendors that had argued the opinion would hamper the growing online lottery and gambling industries.

  • June 3, 2019

    Ex-JPMorgan Forex Trader Stuck Facing Conspiracy Charges

    A Manhattan federal judge on Monday denied a onetime JPMorgan trader's attempt to dump charges of bid-rigging and price-fixing conspiracy in the foreign exchange markets, ruling that it was too soon to exclude certain trading behaviors from examination. 

  • June 3, 2019

    Contractor Ducks Prison In Army Bribery, Kickback Schemes

    A New Jersey federal judge on Monday granted requests from prosecutors and defense lawyers to keep a contractor out of prison over his role in bribery and kickback schemes related to military construction projects, citing his extensive cooperation in the government's case against a former U.S. Army employee.

  • June 3, 2019

    SEC Pledges To Stop College Frat House Ponzi Scheme

    A recent college graduate bilked other students and young investors out of more than $269,000 through a Ponzi scheme he ran from his fraternity house, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission says in a complaint filed Friday in Georgia federal court, urging the court to freeze the man's assets.

  • June 3, 2019

    Couple Urges High Court To Undo $35M EB-5 Fraud Judgment

    A couple accused of scamming Chinese immigrant investors out of millions has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to undo a $35 million judgment against them, arguing that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission does not have the authority to ask courts for disgorgement under high court precedent.

  • June 3, 2019

    Carnival Fined $20M In Cruise Waste Dumping Plea Deal

    A Florida federal judge signed off on a $20 million plea agreement Monday from Carnival Corp. over the cruise giant's violations of a previous illegal waste dumping settlement, but not before she chastised the executives assembled in the Miami courtroom for frustrating a compliance officer's attempts at implementing changes.

  • June 3, 2019

    'Varsity Blues' Attorneys Differ On Definition Of A Bribe

    Attorneys for defendants in the so-called Varsity Blues college admissions scheme said in Boston federal court Monday that prosecutors should cough up evidence that shows some parents believed they were making donations to universities rather than bribes to coaches.

  • June 3, 2019

    Ex-USC Soccer Coach Agrees To Flip In 'Varsity Blues' Case

    A former women's soccer coach at the University of Southern California will plead guilty and cooperate with the government for taking bribes from the mastermind of a nationwide scheme to fraudulently reserve college admissions slots designated for recruited athletes, according to a filing in Boston federal court Monday.

  • June 3, 2019

    Barrett & Singal Creates New 'Research Misconduct' Practice

    Boston law firm Barrett & Singal PC has launched a "research misconduct" practice the firm says is the first of its kind and a response to an uptick in government focus on institutions that receive federal dollars to conduct their research.

  • June 3, 2019

    Justices Deny Martoma's Appeal Of Insider Trading Conviction

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear an appeal from former SAC Capital Advisors LP portfolio manager Mathew Martoma, dealing him yet another defeat in his bid to reverse his insider trading conviction.

  • June 3, 2019

    High Court Won't Review NJ Fraud Foreclosure Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined Monday to review an embattled homeowner’s challenge to the foreclosure of her $2 million house, which she pinned on a longtime corruption conspiracy dating back to an investment fraud case against her and her husband.

Expert Analysis

  • Ethical Social Media Marketing For Lawyers

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    Social media presents rich opportunities to reach prospective clients. Attorneys should not let those opportunities pass them by, but they should keep their ethical obligations in mind as they post, says Cort Sylvester of Nilan Johnson Lewis PA.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Norton Rose Diversity Director Nina Godiwalla

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    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Nina Godiwalla, director of diversity and inclusion at Norton Rose Fulbright.

  • 5 Mistakes Law Firms Make When Responding To RFPs

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    More and more corporations are now using requests for proposals to make data-driven decisions about which law firms to work with, so it is more important than ever for law firms to avoid common RFP mistakes, says Matthew Prinn of RFP Advisory Group.

  • Opinion

    In Defense Of Manafort's 47-Month Sentence

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    The 47-month prison sentence imposed on Paul Manafort is being perceived as far too lenient only because most federal sentences are far too punitive, say criminal defense lawyer Alan Ellis and sentencing consultant Mark Allenbaugh.

  • 9 Data Considerations For Investment Management Attorneys

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    Today, data powers investment management domains like algorithmic-based trading strategies and compliance and risk software. For industry lawyers and compliance officers this is both nothing new and an accelerating source of questions, says Nathan Greene of Shearman & Sterling LLP.

  • Manafort’s Breach Of Plea Deal Has Been Misunderstood

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    Unlike Paul Manafort's case in Virginia — which last week brought a relatively light 47-month sentence — his hearing this Wednesday in the District of Columbia could result in a longer sentence due to Manafort's breach of his plea agreement, an offense widely misunderstood by the press and legal analysts, says Robert Adler of Nossaman LLP.

  • Implications Of 2nd Circ.'s Madoff Foreign Clawback Opinion

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    While the Second Circuit's Madoff opinion last month closed a potential Bankruptcy Code loophole with respect to fraudulent transfers, the opinion did not resolve a split among bankruptcy courts in the Southern District of New York regarding the extraterritorial reach of the Bankruptcy Code’s avoidance powers, say attorneys at Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • Wadler V. Bio-Rad Poses Noteworthy Whistleblower Questions

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    Wadler v. Bio-Rad Labs — where the Ninth Circuit recently affirmed most of an $11 million jury verdict in favor of Sanford Wadler, the company's former general counsel — illustrates the unique and unusually significant risks presented by whistleblower retaliation claims from corporate gatekeepers, say Steve Pearlman and Pinny Goldberg of Proskauer Rose LLP.

  • CFTC Intentions Unclear In Foreign Corrupt Practice Advisory

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    The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission advisory, issued this week, announcing its entry into the foreign corrupt practices space, leaves open a million-dollar question: What violations are under the CFTC’s purview? Laura Brookover at Covington & Burling LLP looks at some possibilities.

  • Guest Feature

    Leon Panetta In The Courtroom, Langley And Area 51

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    Over the course of his career, Leon Panetta has served as a U.S. representative, director of the CIA and secretary of defense. But before all that, he was a lawyer. Randy Maniloff of White and Williams LLP asked him about his legal background — and about little men from outer space.

  • At The Intersection Of Escobar, Touhy And Gov't Dismissal

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    Last week the head of the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Fraud Section warned False Claims Act defendants about using discovery as a tactic to solicit dismissal. The issue is further complicated in nonintervened FCA cases, where circuit courts apply vastly different review standards when an agency refuses to produce subpoenaed materials, says Derek Adams at Feldesman Tucker Leifer Fidell LLP.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Finding A Voice, And A New Home

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    My Fulbright scholarship project developed after I talked to my grandmother in the Philippines about the cost of her medication. Drugs developed in the U.S. and Europe are typically sold there for prices beyond the reach of many Filipinos. So I advocated for compulsory licensing for lifesaving medicines, says Melissa Martinez of McGuireWoods LLP.

  • Perspectives

    Sentencing Data Raise Major Questions About Guidelines

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    A 30-city report by the U.S. Sentencing Commission sheds new light on the prevalence of unwarranted sentencing disparities in federal cases, and should get more attention from prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges and the public, says Stephen Lee of Benesch Friedlander Coplan & Aronoff LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Willett Reviews 'Guilty Pleasures'

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    Professor Laura Little’s new book, "Guilty Pleasures: Comedy and Law in America," will make you laugh and make you think — and to a federal circuit judge who reads the Constitution for the articles, it is ... appealing, says Fifth Circuit Judge Don Willett.

  • International Pharma Rules Tighten Restrictions On Gifts

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    The International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers & Associations' revised code of practice specifically targets cultural gifts that may create the appearance of improper influence. Pharmaceutical companies will need to understand the differences and overlap between this ban and various countries' anti-bribery legislation, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray LLP.

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