White Collar

  • April 29, 2021

    Prison Phone Rate Slash Tops FCC's May Agenda

    The Federal Communications Commission is poised to further crack down on the high call rates charged in prisons and jails, teeing up a vote next month that would finally slash long-distance, per-minute phone charges by up to 42%.

  • April 29, 2021

    Maxwell Judge Wants More Info In Scrap Over Legal Papers

    A Manhattan federal judge directed a jailhouse lawyer Thursday to determine if Ghislaine Maxwell's legal papers were taken or duplicated during a recent encounter with guards, after the sex crimes suspect's defense team alleged "intimidation and humiliation."

  • April 29, 2021

    Ex-Detroit Mayor Ally Released From Prison Years Early

    A former contractor and co-defendant to ex-Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick on Thursday was granted compassionate release from prison after serving eight years of a 21-year sentence over a municipal bribery and kickback scheme, with the judge citing health problems and the fact Kilpatrick had his sentence commuted.

  • April 29, 2021

    Gambler Gets 28 Months For Stealing $9.4M From Investor

    A high-stakes gambler who admitted he'd scammed an unnamed investor out of $9.6 million by lying about how he'd use the money was sentenced to 28 months in prison in Illinois federal court Thursday, according to the U.S. attorney's office.

  • April 29, 2021

    'Missing' Atty Forged Mom's Signature For Cash, Court Told

    A New York City real estate attorney accused of stealing millions of dollars from his clients and going missing is facing new allegations — this time from his own elderly mother, who claims in New York state court that he forged her signature to secure more than $2.6 million. 

  • April 29, 2021

    Texas AG Can Be Named In Ex-Clients' Fraud Suit, Court Says

    Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton can be named as a responsible third party in a securities fraud lawsuit against his former business partners and a company he once owned and advised, the full Dallas court of appeals has ruled.

  • April 29, 2021

    SAP Admits To Illegal Iran Exports In $8M Deal With Feds

    German software company SAP SE will pay more than $8 million in penalties for illegally exporting its U.S.-made software products to users in Iran, the U.S. Department of Justice said Thursday.

  • April 29, 2021

    Ex-Mayor Used Investor Cash For Shoes, Jewelry, Jury Told

    A former Massachusetts mayor showered his then-girlfriend with expensive trips and gifts, including a $700 pair of Christian Louboutin heels and a $1,000 Tiffany necklace, she told a Boston jury Thursday, and prosecutors claim he used investors' money for the pricey items.

  • April 29, 2021

    Cannabis Co. Expected To Plead In Ethanol Dumping Case

    A California marijuana business plans to plead guilty to charges it illegally dumped more than a dozen barrels of ethanol used in its extraction process, court records show.

  • April 28, 2021

    GOP Concerns May Delay Bill To Restore FTC Restitution Tool

    Legislation making clear that the Federal Trade Commission can go after bad marketplace actors for court-ordered monetary relief appears to have bipartisan support in Congress, but GOP opposition to some provisions of the proposed bill could complicate passage.

  • April 28, 2021

    No Prison For Ex-Bumble Bee VPs Involved In Price-Fixing

    Two tearful ex-Bumble Bee Foods executives who pled guilty to price-fixing avoided prison Wednesday when a California federal judge sentenced them to probation, finding that while they worked with rivals at StarKist and Chicken of the Sea to illegally raise canned tuna prices, they also helped put their ex-boss behind bars.

  • April 28, 2021

    Ex-Katten Atty Caught In Shkreli Fraud Gives Up Law License

    The former Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP attorney who was convicted of conspiring to commit fraud with former pharmaceutical executive Martin Shkreli has handed in his law license, according to a Wednesday order from a New York state appellate court.

  • April 28, 2021

    Ex-NY Courts Worker Guilty of Threats To Kill AOC, Pelosi

    A New York federal jury found a former courts worker guilty Wednesday of threatening to kill Democratic lawmakers including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of New York announced.

  • April 28, 2021

    Texas County Must Face Ex-Judge's Due Process Suit

    A Texas county is not immune to allegations by an ex-state judge that it should be liable for due process and Fourth Amendment violations she allegedly suffered after politically motivated charges were filed against her, a Texas federal judge has determined.

  • April 28, 2021

    Former Brooklyn Carpenters Union Leader Convicted Of Fraud

    The former president of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters' Brooklyn chapter has been found guilty of fraud and a pair of related charges stemming from his involvement in a bribery scheme, according to a federal New York jury's verdict Wednesday.

  • April 28, 2021

    Rollback Of Restitution Power Leaves FTC Cases In Limbo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's ruling last week in AMG Capital v. FTC all but stripped the Federal Trade Commission of its ability to recoup money from lawbreakers in federal court and the agency's pending cases are sure to feel the impact.

  • April 28, 2021

    Ex-Mayor Was Warned Of Investor Trouble, Jury Hears

    The former mayor of Fall River, Massachusetts, was warned by a potential business partner that using investor money meant to support his startup for personal expenses could result in criminal charges and was "a horrible mistake," a Boston jury heard Wednesday.

  • April 28, 2021

    Feds Accuse Bitcoin Fog Operator Of Money Laundering

    The purported operator of cryptocurrency mixing service Bitcoin Fog on Tuesday was arrested in Los Angeles and accused of laundering hundreds of millions of dollars worth of bitcoin.

  • April 28, 2021

    Raymond James Gets Bigger Chunk Of $8M Jay Peak Deal

    A Florida federal judge signed off on an amendment Wednesday that increases investment bank Raymond James & Associates' entitlement to recoveries in an $8 million settlement resolving claims against law firms implicated in the failed Jay Peak ski resort EB-5 immigrant investor scam.

  • April 28, 2021

    1st Circ. Upholds Enhanced Sentence For Tax Fraudster

    A Massachusetts federal court correctly applied an enhanced 84-month prison sentence to a man convicted of participating in a $1.6 million tax fraud scheme, the First Circuit ruled, affirming a lower court decision.

  • April 28, 2021

    Donziger Prosecutors Say Contempt Case Isn't 'Vindictive'

    Special prosecutors pursuing criminal contempt charges against Steven Donziger urged a New York federal judge Tuesday not to toss the case, arguing the disbarred attorney's allegations of a "vindictive" prosecution and judicial bias have already been rejected by the court.

  • April 28, 2021

    7th Circ. Says Cell Info Used Legally To Find Robber

    The Seventh Circuit has found that the real-time AT&T cell site location data Indiana police obtained without a warrant to locate a convicted robber and confirm his whereabouts during a spree of robberies was constitutional under the Fourth Amendment.

  • April 28, 2021

    SEC Enforcement Head Resigns 1 Week After Being Hired

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission said Wednesday that the enforcement director it hired last week has resigned, just days after a federal judge raised the prospect of sanctions in a case she had recently handled as a corporate defense attorney.

  • April 28, 2021

    Ill. Accountant Admits To Role In $5.3M Auto Lender Fraud

    An Illinois accountant admitted in federal court Wednesday that he participated in a scheme to funnel $5.3 million from a subprime auto lending company to a shell company by selling marked-up GPS devices and collecting unearned vehicle warranty commissions.

  • April 28, 2021

    Teary Ex-CEO Tells Jury Mortgage Co.'s Failure Not His Fault

    Live Well Financial founder Michael Hild cried Wednesday as he recalled the bankruptcy of his business, but prosecutors who say he illegally overvalued the company while paying himself $24 million pushed back after Hild told Manhattan jurors he was "just along for the ride" and wasn't to blame.

Expert Analysis

  • Cos. Should Keep A Close Watch On SIGPR Enforcement

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    The special inspector general for pandemic recovery is enlisting help from other agencies to broadly exercise its enforcement mandate, and there is no better time than now for companies to ensure they are documenting use of relief funds, particularly if they borrowed from more than one program, say attorneys at Cadwalader.

  • Let's Emerge From The Pandemic As Legal Innovators

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    The pandemic forced a digital reckoning on the legal profession — which switched to remote workforces, paperless workflows and digital signatures seemingly overnight — and law firms and corporate legal departments can keep up the innovation momentum with three guiding principles, says Kevin Clem at HBR Consulting.

  • What New Corporate Disclosures Mean For Real Estate

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    The recently passed Corporate Transparency Act's requirement that companies report their beneficial ownership and control parties will dramatically change the disclosure regime for all parties involved in real estate capital formation and investment, even as they await further clarification on the law's many ambiguities, say attorneys at Pillsbury.

  • A Road Map For US Involvement In Europe's Cum-Ex Probe

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    The dividend arbitrage trading strategy known as cum-ex continues to face regulatory scrutiny in Europe, and stateside regulators may soon follow suit with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s recent American depositary receipt probe as a guide for enforcement, says Joshua Ray at Rahman Ravelli.

  • Perspectives

    DOJ Charging Memo Rescission Aids Prosecutorial Discretion

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's recent rescission of a 2017 memo that required prosecutors to charge federal defendants with the offenses that would carry the most severe penalties should be welcomed by prosecutors associations as supporting prosecutorial discretion, even when the new policy may lead to leniency, says Marc Levin at the Council on Criminal Justice.

  • Anticipating Predictive Analytics' Potential Uses In Litigation

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    Predictive analytics — the marriage of statistics and machine learning now commonly used in litigation for document review and production — will soon likely bring exciting new uses in discovery and beyond, offering attorneys more data-driven ways to establish facts and predict case outcomes, say Richard Finkelman and Karl Schliep at Berkeley Research Group.

  • High Court Could End Judicial Grand Jury Secrecy Exceptions

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    In deciding whether Congress can access the Robert Mueller investigation's grand jury materials, there is a considerable chance that the U.S. Supreme Court could revoke courts' inherent authority to create even important, limited exceptions to grand jury secrecy, including for matters of historical significance, say attorneys at Sullivan & Cromwell.

  • Opinion

    This Black History Month, Law Firms Should Challenge Norms

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    With so little progress made in the diversification of the legal industry, Black History Month is a good time for law firms to adjust their organizational cultures, ensuring that diversity and inclusion goals are transparent and measured in the same way billable hour and other core targets are — through written, enforceable policies, says Paulette Brown at Locke Lord.

  • Perspectives

    A Critical Step Toward Eliminating Profit Motive From Prisons

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    President Joe Biden's recent executive order to phase out the federal government's use of private prisons is a welcome start to what needs to be a broad reform of the prison system — where profit-based incentives to incarcerate run deep, says Jeffrey Bornstein at Rosen Bien.

  • Prep For Enviro Scrutiny As Trump Policies Are Rolled Back

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    Given the U.S. Department of Justice's rollback of Trump policies seen as impediments to environmental enforcement, and the Biden administration's intent to increase enforcement efforts, industrial actors should invest now in compliance, say Jeffrey Corey and Michael Zody at Parsons Behle.

  • 4 Takeaways For States From 1st Circ. Wire Act Lottery Ruling

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    The First Circuit's recent decision in NH Lottery Commission v. Rosen, that state-run, intrastate, online lotteries can continue to operate, may precipitate significant growth in the gambling industry despite limitations on online wagering, say attorneys at White & Case.

  • Series

    Judges On Race

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    On the heels of nationwide calls to address systemic racism and inequality, five sitting state and federal judges shed light on the disparities that exist in the justice system and how to guard against bias in this series of Law360 guest articles.

  • Law Firm Penalties On Departing Partners Just Got Riskier

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    A D.C. appeals court's recent decision in Jacobson Holman v. Gentner sharply limiting the ability of law firms to financially penalize departing partners continues a clear trend among court rulings and bar ethics opinions, and should encourage firms to review their partnership agreements for any ethical land mines, says Alan Kabat at Bernabei & Kabat.

  • Illiquid Asset Valuation Presents Unique Risks Amid Pandemic

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s recently approved investment adviser rules signal that the valuation of illiquid assets could become a major risk amid COVID-19 market turmoil, with post-2008 valuation disputes offering a cautionary tale, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • NJ Case Has Lessons On Arbitration Clauses In Atty Retainers

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    The New Jersey Supreme Court’s recent opinion in Delaney v. Dickey tracks and builds on other jurisdictions' limitations on the enforceability of arbitration provisions in law firm retainer agreements, and provides useful guidance for lawyers hoping to bind clients to arbitration, say attorneys at Harris Wiltshire.

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