White Collar

  • May 05, 2022

    Cognizant Must Hand Over Docs In Ex-Execs' Bribery Case

    A New Jersey federal judge has ordered Cognizant Technology Solutions Corp. to hand over troves of documents from an internal corruption investigation to a pair of indicted former executives who are accused of arranging a $2 million bribe in exchange for a construction permit in India.

  • May 05, 2022

    Spinal Device Co. Inks $1M Midtrial Deal To End FCA Claims

    Spinal implant maker Reliance Medical Systems reached a deal Thursday to end the federal government's False Claims Act suit alleging it orchestrated kickbacks to surgeons who used its products in spinal surgeries, agreeing to a $1 million settlement the day after opening statements in the California federal trial.

  • May 05, 2022

    Ex-Saul Ewing Paralegal Pleads Not Guilty To $600K Theft

    A former paralegal for Saul Ewing Arnstein & Lehr LLP pled not guilty on Thursday to charges that she orchestrated a nine-year $600,000 embezzlement scheme from bankruptcy estate accounts the firm handled.

  • May 05, 2022

    Ex-BitMEX CEO Asks For No Prison Time In 'Novel' AML Case

    The co-founder and former CEO of offshore cryptocurrency derivatives exchange BitMEX sought to avoid prison Wednesday after pleading guilty in what he called a "first-of-its-kind" criminal case alleging the platform flouted U.S. anti-money laundering requirements.

  • May 05, 2022

    Tribal Chair, Architect Guilty On Some Counts In Bribe Case

    A Massachusetts federal jury convicted the former Mashpee Wampanoag chairman and an architect of some bribery and extortion charges Thursday over an alleged scheme to protect the design firm's multimillion-dollar contract for the tribe's $1 billion casino development.

  • May 05, 2022

    Engineer Hid Pilfered Chip Files As Pokémon Pics, Jury Told

    An Analog Devices Inc. engineer disguised valuable microchip schematics as image files named after Pokémon characters when he secretly sent the trade secrets to his personal computer to rip off the designs as his own, federal prosecutors told a Boston jury Thursday.

  • May 05, 2022

    Fiji Seizes Russian Oligarch's $300M Yacht At DOJ's Request

    Fijian authorities have seized a $300 million yacht owned by a sanctioned Russian oligarch, the U.S. Department of Justice said Thursday, touting the latest prize in the government's bid to punish the Kremlin for its invasion of Ukraine.

  • May 05, 2022

    Ex-K&L Gates Atty Can't Loosen Bail Restrictions, Feds Say

    The former K&L Gates LLP partner charged with cyberstalking former colleagues cannot be allowed to shed an ankle monitor and leave home confinement simply because he is following the conditions of his bail, federal prosecutors told a New York judge on Wednesday.

  • May 04, 2022

    Chicken Execs Want Their 3rd Day In Court ASAP

    Chicken industry executives accused of price-fixing urged a Colorado federal court not to delay their impending third trial, arguing that prosecutors had plenty of time to prepare for the previous trials and their justification for pushing back the start date is vague and groundless.

  • May 04, 2022

    Balwani Can't Use Giant Spreadsheet In Theranos Defense

    The California federal judge overseeing ex-Theranos executive Ramesh "Sunny" Balwani's criminal fraud trial denied the defense's request Wednesday to introduce a 2,000-page spreadsheet Walgreens purportedly sent to Theranos, part of Balwani's effort to show he was truthful in telling investors that the companies were serious about expanding their partnership.

  • May 04, 2022

    Spinal Implant Co. Accused Of Doctor Kickbacks In FCA Trial

    Prosecutors told a California federal jury during opening statements in a False Claims Act trial Wednesday that Reliance Medical Systems orchestrated a kickback scheme that illegally paid surgeons for using its spinal implant devices, resulting in medically unnecessary procedures and fraudulent claims to Medicare.

  • May 04, 2022

    Nationwide Unit Says Underlying Suits Constitute Single Claim

    A Nationwide insurance unit asked a Colorado federal judge to declare that it can treat two underlying lawsuits against a law firm as a single claim.

  • May 04, 2022

    Windfall Taxes Hurt Energy Investment, UK's Johnson Says

    Ahead of local elections scheduled for Thursday across the United Kingdom, Prime Minister Boris Johnson rejected one-off taxes on fossil fuel companies during a television interview, saying they'd discourage investments in what he characterized as stability in the energy sector.

  • May 04, 2022

    Ex-Dean Gets 1 Year For Defrauding $651K From Student Org.

    A former professor and interim dean for Chicago State University's pharmacy school was sentenced to a year and a day in federal prison Wednesday for conducting a fraud scheme through which she pocketed $651,000 in donations meant for a student organization she led.

  • May 04, 2022

    Del. Chancery Stays Stimwave Tech's Battle With Ex-CEO

    Stimwave Technology Inc.'s case against its former CEO Laura Perryman will be stayed indefinitely pending the resolution of a Department of Justice investigation into the company she once led, a Delaware Chancery Court vice chancellor ruled Wednesday.

  • May 04, 2022

    Crowdfunding Portal Overhyped Robot's Skills, FINRA Says

    The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority fined two California-based crowdfunding portals a combined $1.75 million on Wednesday after finding that one misled investors about the "exaggerated" proficiency of a home robot while the other raised millions more than regulations permit. 

  • May 04, 2022

    Ex-Perkins Coie Atty Must Let Judge Review Fusion Emails

    A D.C. federal judge said Wednesday that he plans to review additional sets of emails at the center of a privilege dispute in the run-up to a former Perkins Coie LLP partner's trial for allegedly hiding his relationship with Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign in a 2016 meeting with the FBI.

  • May 04, 2022

    Policyholder Gains In Virus Coverage State Trial Court Suits

    Insurance carriers may hope that COVID-19 coverage litigation is nearing its end with rulings in their favor by the Massachusetts and Iowa high courts, but positive outcomes for policyholders in Nevada, Pennsylvania and California state courts show some of these suits may still have legs.

  • May 04, 2022

    NBA Health Fraud Prosecutors Seize Ex-Players' Phones

    Manhattan federal prosecutors are reviewing the cellphone and email accounts of several retired NBA players in an expanding criminal case accusing them of scheming to pilfer $4 million from the league's health care system with phony medical claims.

  • May 04, 2022

    Gibson Dunn Lands Ex-Smyser Kaplan Litigator In Houston

    Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP has added a commercial litigator to its Houston office, who spent the past five years as a partner with Smyser Kaplan & Veselka LLP, the firm announced Monday.

  • May 03, 2022

    Pfizer Scientist Didn't OK Theranos Using Logo, Jury Hears

    A former Pfizer scientist testified Tuesday in the criminal fraud trial of ex-Theranos executive Ramesh "Sunny" Balwani that he didn't authorize adding a Pfizer logo to a Theranos report endorsing its blood-testing devices, after Balwani's attorneys lost a battle to exclude evidence of the doctored report.

  • May 03, 2022

    Ex-Homeland Security Agent Found Guilty In Bribery Scheme

    A California federal jury on Tuesday found a former U.S. Department of Homeland Security agent guilty of 30 felonies stemming from an alleged bribery scheme in which he accepted cash and other perks to hand over sensitive law enforcement information and take official action, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • May 03, 2022

    Convicted White Sox Ticket Broker Threatened With Contempt

    Federal prosecutors on Tuesday said an Illinois ticket broker serving 18 months in prison for participating in a $1 million fraud scheme has failed to pay court-ordered restitution and may deserve to be held in contempt.

  • May 03, 2022

    Cannabis Attys Still Practicing Under Cloud Of Prohibition

    Cannabis attorneys and ethics experts said Tuesday that their field of law has made strides toward shedding the stigma of its early days, but the drug's continuing federal illegality and the patchwork of state regulatory regimes mean there are still ethical and business pitfalls to keep in mind.

  • May 03, 2022

    Wells Fargo In Talks To Settle 2 Government Probes

    Wells Fargo is in talks with federal regulators to settle investigations into foreign banks that used a Wells Fargo "software-based solution" to carry out prohibited transactions, and is negotiating a deal on a separate probe into the bank's 401(k) plan, according to a securities filing on Tuesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Why I'll Miss Arguing Before Justice Breyer

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    Carter Phillips at Sidley shares some of his fondest memories of retiring Justice Stephen Breyer both inside and out of the courtroom, and explains why he thinks the justice’s multipronged questions during U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments were everything an advocate could ask for.

  • Opinion

    Amid Historic Spending, Congress Should Strengthen FCA

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    Notwithstanding the misleadingly rosy picture painted by the U.S. Department of Justice’s fiscal year 2021 False Claims Act recovery statistics, Congress should close legislative gaps that deter whistleblower actions, especially in light of increasingly high government spending and adjacent opportunities to misuse public funds, says Jeb White at Taxpayers Against Fraud.

  • Practical Implications Of SEC's Enforcement Policy Shift

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    Harris Fischman and Daniel Sinnreich at Paul Weiss dissect the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s increasingly aggressive stance on enforcement remedies, such as requiring admissions of wrongdoing in some cases, and cutting back on so-called Wells meetings — defendants' chief opportunity to communicate with the SEC before facing charges.

  • What Cos. Can Learn From The 2021 FCA Recovery Statistics

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    Attorneys at Winston unpack the recently released U.S. Department of Justice False Claims Act recovery statistics for fiscal year 2021, discuss how they compare to prior years and what companies in an expanding array of industries should expect next.

  • Compliance Takeaways From DOJ Duress Defense Guidance

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's recent Foreign Corrupt Practices Act advisory opinion sheds light on the applicability of the duress defense, which may help companies formulate policies to avoid liability in high-stakes situations, but several unanswered questions about the scope of the defense remain, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • Recent Rulings Show Lawyer Criticism Of Judges Is Perilous

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    Although many lawyers may believe the First Amendment broadly protects their opinions and good faith criticism of judges, recent sanctions decisions from courts across the country suggest lawyers are at greater risk of discipline for criticizing judges than they have been in the past, says John Harris at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • Takeaways From DOJ Fraud Section's 2021 Year In Review

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    Attorneys at Wiley highlight important trends in the U.S. Department of Justice Fraud Section’s just-released annual report, identifying how 2021 statistics compare to the previous year and predicting future areas of focus for the DOJ's prosecution of white collar crime.

  • Breyer's Role In Courthouse Design Sets A Judicial Template

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    As U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer prepares to retire, his pivotal role two decades ago in the design of the award-winning John Joseph Moakley U.S. Courthouse in Boston demonstrates how the judiciary can engage in civic architecture and specifically the design of courthouses, says Kate Diamond at HDR.

  • 2nd Circ. Libor-Rigging Reversal Is A Boon For Defendants

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    In U.S. v. Connolly, the Second Circuit recently reversed convictions of two former Deutsche Bank traders accused of rigging Libor, giving defendants ammunition for more favorable jury instructions on the requisite falsity for a fraud conviction, and ensuring the government is held to its burden of proof, say Rachel Maimin and Robert Johnston at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Opinion

    Digital Asset Regulatory Vacuum Is A Threat To Investors

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    Recent digital heists prove the lack of U.S. regulatory oversight relating to so-called Web3 digital trading platforms is an extraordinary threat to investors and to the safety and security of the global financial marketplace, says cybersecurity consultant John Reed Stark.

  • Federal Courts Will No Longer Brook Prosecutor Misconduct

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    A New York federal judge's recent order for an evidentiary hearing on prosecutors' possibly intentional discovery violations in the U.S. v. Giacobbe real estate fraud case evinces a growing intolerance of prosecutorial misconduct that defense counsel should exploit, say Celeste Koeleveld and Carlisle Overbey at Clifford Chance.

  • BigLaw Must Nix All-Or-Nothing Work Model To Retain Talent

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    Record numbers of workers quitting in the “Great Resignation,” paired with the growing success of nontraditional and freelance legal services, show that BigLaw’s management committees must reconsider rigid billable hour expectations and be open to part-time and noncontinuous work arrangements, says Hui Chen at Hui Chen Ethics.

  • Opinion

    Biden's Supreme Court Nominee Should Have 5 Key Qualities

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    In fulfilling his campaign promise to nominate a Black woman to the U.S. Supreme Court, President Joe Biden should look for candidates with experience as a state trial judge, a background in public education and a few other important characteristics, says Benes Aldana, president of The National Judicial College.

  • Inside The New Guidance On Federally Funded Research

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    In light of the White House's recently released national security guidance for federally funded research, institutions should ensure their policies and systems can compile information to satisfy required disclosures of outside activity, conflicts of interest and other potential sources of inappropriate influence, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • SEC Is Pushing Boundaries In Insider Trading Enforcement

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's actions in 2021 demonstrate that insider trading remains a key enforcement priority, and that the commission is interested in pursuing new categories of actors and novel theories, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

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