Aerospace & Defense

  • February 23, 2018

    Sallyport Sues 'Disgruntled' Former Workers For Defamation

    Defense contractor Sallyport Global Holdings sued two former employees for defamation in Virginia state court Friday, alleging they had deliberately lied about the company's alleged involvement in a sex trafficking ring, fraud and efforts to conceal information about security breaches as part of its support work at Balad Air Force Base in Iraq.

  • February 23, 2018

    Pentagon Favors 'Targeted' Steel, Aluminum Tariffs

    The U.S. Department of Defense has endorsed hitting imports of steel and aluminum with “targeted” tariffs rather than across-the-board enforcement measures, according to a memo released by the Trump administration late Thursday.

  • February 23, 2018

    US Steps Into Tricare FCA Suit Against Pharmacy, PE Owner

    The government has intervened in a False Claims Act suit accusing a Florida compounding pharmacy and its private equity fund owner of running a kickback scheme that induced Tricare to pay more than $68 million for medically unnecessary prescriptions, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Friday.

  • February 23, 2018

    State Dept. Approves $3.2B Patriot Missile Sale To Sweden

    The U.S. State Department has approved the possible sale of Patriot missiles to Sweden in a deal worth an estimated $3.2 billion, saying the weapons system would help ensure the security of the strategically important country.

  • February 23, 2018

    US Squeezes N. Korean Shipping Sector With New Sanctions

    The Trump administration on Friday unveiled a slew of new sanctions aimed at cracking down on North Korea’s shipping industry, flexing its muscle in what the president deemed the “largest ever” sanctions package imposed against the country.

  • February 23, 2018

    Wilson Sonsini Adds Ex-Skadden National Security Pro In DC

    Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati PC on Thursday announced it has brought aboard a former Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP associate for the firm's national security regulatory practice in Washington, D.C.

  • February 23, 2018

    Manafort Associate Pleads Guilty In Mueller Probe

    Richard Gates, an ex-business associate of President Donald Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and himself a former member of the campaign, pled guilty Friday to charges brought as a part of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

  • February 22, 2018

    Palantir Ordered To Turn Over Books, Records To Investor

    The bitter feud between Palantir Technologies Inc. and an early investor accused of stealing its trade secrets took another turn on Thursday after the Delaware Chancery Court ruled the secretive data analysis company must turn over internal information to KT4 Partners LLC.

  • February 22, 2018

    Facebook Shouldn't Expect 'Fake News' Legal Woes, For Now

    Social media sites are facing heightened scrutiny amid charges that an army of Russia-based “bot” accounts meddled in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, but companies like Facebook, Twitter and Google are largely immune from liability even if they unwittingly help spread propaganda, attorneys say.

  • February 22, 2018

    Senate Budget Chief Urges DOD To Show Audit Progress

    Congress could hold back on proposed growth in the U.S Department of Defense’s budget if it doesn’t assure lawmakers and the public that it is spending money wisely, including by demonstrating its progress on a pending department-wide audit, a senior GOP senator said Wednesday.

  • February 22, 2018

    Deals Rumor Mill: Phoenix, Telecom Italia, United Tech

    Phoenix Group is reportedly nearing a deal for Standard Life's insurance unit, F2i and Rai Way increased their bid for Telecom Italia's broadcasting business, and United Technologies' CEO said the company will decide by the end of the year whether to split up.

  • February 22, 2018

    GAO Waves Off Air Force Contractor's Bad Financial Report

    The allegation that the U.S. Air Force ignored a contractor's adverse financial rating does not involve the sort of corporate responsibility issue that merits review, the U.S. Government Accountability Office recently said in denying a protest over a $105.6 million cyber defense deal.

  • February 22, 2018

    BMW To Pay Service Members $2.1M In Lease Refund Row

    BMW Financial Services NA has agreed to pay more than $2 million to 492 service members who terminated their vehicle leases early for military obligations, resolving U.S. Department of Justice claims that the company violated federal law when it failed to refund them a portion of their up-front lease payments.

  • February 22, 2018

    Crowell & Moring Adds Ex-DOJ Gov’t Contracts Trial Atty

    A former Covington & Burling LLP and U.S. Department of Justice attorney, who has successfully defended a $1 billion contract on behalf of PAE Government Services Inc. before the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, has joined Crowell & Moring LLP’s government contracts group.

  • February 22, 2018

    CACI Still Faces Torture Claims By Abu Ghraib Prisoners

    Several former prisoners of Iraq’s notorious Abu Ghraib prison failed to plausibly support direct liability claims against a CACI International unit over its employees’ alleged torture and abuse of detainees, but a Virginia federal judge did back their conspiracy and aiding and abetting claims in ruling not to dismiss the suit.

  • February 22, 2018

    GAO Sustains Protest Of $771M IT Solutions Contract

    The Defense Intelligence Agency did not provide enough reasoning not to award an information technology contract worth more than $770 million to ManTech Advanced Systems despite giving the proposal a higher technical rating than the winner's, the U.S. Government Accountability Office said on Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2018

    New Cloud Data Bill Pits Big Tech Against Privacy Hawks

    Silicon Valley giants have teamed up with privacy advocates to fight the U.S. government’s bid, now at the U.S. Supreme Court, to access Microsoft data stored on an Irish server. But that uneasy alliance has crumbled as lawmakers mull a plan to carve out a more concrete path for U.S. prosecutors pursuing data stored abroad, with critics claiming data-sharing deals resulting from the bill could erode human rights.

  • February 21, 2018

    Prosecution Appeals Suspension Of Guantanamo Terror Trial

    Prosecutors in the military commission for the alleged mastermind of the deadly USS Cole bombing on Wednesday appealed the indefinite halting of the case by the judge overseeing the commission, who had cited concerns that defense counsel was engaged in a “revolution” against the commission system.

  • February 21, 2018

    DOD To Send Transgender Recommendations To White House

    Defense Secretary James Mattis will deliver his recommendations regarding the service of transgender troops in the military to President Donald Trump this week, but the U.S. Department of Defense has no plans to publicly release those recommendations, it said Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2018

    Embattled Shulkin Working To Stop 'Hijack' By VA Staff

    U.S. Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, under fire after a recent watchdog report criticized his conduct related to a trip to Europe last year, continued to insist Tuesday that he will not step down, while adding he would work to stamp out a purported staff rebellion within his agency.

Expert Analysis

  • Managing Aircraft Lease Novations: A Primer

    Patrice Robinet

    With the world’s commercial aviation fleet nearly set to double over the next 15 years, trading activity among lessors is bound to increase. Aircraft lessees will confront ever-increasing requests from lessors to consent to novations of existing leases. Parties to aircraft trade transactions would do well to engage lessees in person early in the process, says Patrice Robinet of Akerman LLP.

  • 10 Government Contracting Trends To Watch This Year

    Joseph Berger

    Recent developments point to continued high total spending on government contracts, which will improve national defense, disaster relief and domestic infrastructure, presenting opportunities and challenges for both agencies and contractors, says Joseph Berger of Thompson Hine LLP.

  • Autonomous Drones: Set To Fly, But May Not Comply

    Sara Baxenberg

    A California company has unveiled a fully autonomous "selfie" drone, which promises to stay trained on a moving subject, capturing footage while avoiding any obstacles. But a drone that flies itself may run afoul of a number of Federal Aviation Administration regulations, even if it has fancy obstacle detection and personal tracking, say Sara Baxenberg and Joshua Turner of Wiley Rein LLP.

  • How Emerging Sources Of ESI Will Impact Discovery

    Charles McGee

    Late last year, the Sedona Conference released the third edition of its principles addressing electronic document production, updated to account for innovations like Snapchat and Twitter. It may be necessary for these principles to be updated more often in order to keep pace with technology, says Charles McGee III of Murphy & McGonigle LLP.

  • Put The Brakes On Acceleration Bay Litigation Funder Ruling

    David Gallagher

    Last week, the District of Delaware raised eyebrows by ruling that documents provided to a litigation funder and its counsel in connection with their due diligence are categorically not attorney work product. Acceleration Bay v. Activision Blizzard seems to be a case of bad facts making bad law, says David Gallagher, investment manager and legal counsel for Bentham IMF.

  • Considerations For Attorneys Using Artificial Intelligence

    Ben Allgrove

    Artificial intelligence tools can empower attorneys to work more efficiently, deepen and broaden their areas of expertise, and provide increased value to clients, which in turn can improve legal transparency, dispute resolution and access to justice. But there are some common pitfalls already apparent in the legal industry, say Ben Allgrove and Yoon Chae of Baker McKenzie.

  • CFIUS Scrutiny Of Foreign Acquisitions Intensifies

    John Barker

    The environment for foreign investment in the United States is shifting. Most recently, the Chinese acquisition of MoneyGram was derailed after the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States rejected proposals offered to try to mitigate national security concerns. At the same time, U.S. legislation to enhance CFIUS controls seems to be gaining momentum, say attorneys with Arnold & Porter.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Duncan Reviews 'Justice And Empathy'

    Judge Allyson Duncan

    In "Justice and Empathy: Toward a Constitutional Ideal," the late Yale Law School professor Robert Burt makes a compelling case for the undeniable role of the courts in protecting the vulnerable and oppressed​. But the question of how the judiciary might conform to Burt’s expectations raises practical problems​, says U.S. Circuit Judge Allyson Duncan of the Fourth Circuit. ​

  • Emerging Trends In FCA Enforcement: 2018 Outlook

    Vince Farhat

    Two new policies from the U.S. Department of Justice, along with ongoing developments concerning the elements of scienter and materiality stemming from the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision in Escobar, have the potential to significantly change the landscape of False Claims Act enforcement in the year ahead, say attorneys with Holland & Knight LLP.

  • Movements Without Motion In Russian Sanctions Policy

    Fatema Merchant

    Current sanctions appear not to deter Russian bad behavior. And the much anticipated oligarchs list appears to have been cribbed from someone else’s homework. Taking the two together, one begins to suspect that the Trump administration, without a further push from Congress or world events, will continue to resist ratcheting up Russia sanctions, say members of Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP.