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Aerospace & Defense

  • January 18, 2019

    Kan. Man Accused Of Fraud To Net $12.7M In Gov't Contracts

    A Kansas man tasked with running a construction firm is accused of fraudulently obtaining more than $12.7 million in government construction contracts and lying to federal investigators about the company's status as a small business owned by a veteran who became disabled in the line of duty, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Friday.

  • January 18, 2019

    Gov't Escapes Air Force Worker's Sex Harassment Suit

    The federal government won’t have to face claims that a U.S. Air Force bowling alley employee was sexually harassed at work, an Illinois federal judge has ruled, finding the Federal Tort Claims Act shields the government from intentional tort claims.

  • January 18, 2019

    Wash. Tells Navy To Address Pollution Or Face Lawsuit

    Washington will step into a lawsuit over the U.S. Navy's process for cleaning decommissioned ships unless it quickly agrees to clean up related waste, the state attorney general announced Thursday, accusing the Navy of releasing "50 dump truck loads" of pollutants into Puget Sound from one ship cleaning alone.

  • January 18, 2019

    General Dynamics Must Serve Libya To Enforce £16M Award

    A U.K court ruled Friday that for General Dynamics U.K. Ltd. to enforce a £16.1 million ($20.7 million) award issued against Libya in a dispute over a military communications contract, the company must serve the country with the order granting it permission to enforce the award.

  • January 18, 2019

    DOD Says Most Key Bases Vulnerable To Climate Change

    The majority of critical U.S. military bases face risks due to climate change over the next two decades, with some already feeling the effects, according to a U.S. Department of Defense report made public Friday.

  • January 18, 2019

    Theranos Execs' Days Of Reckoning Draw Nearer

    The dissolution of Theranos Inc. hasn’t ended legal troubles for ex-leaders of the wannabe bloodwork disruptor, who are getting closer to climactic trials in fraud suits brought by prosecutors, consumers and securities enforcers. Here, Law360 updates attorneys on criminal and civil cases threatening former executives of the onetime Silicon Valley juggernaut.

  • January 18, 2019

    Bill Would Ban Tech Sales To Some Chinese Telecom Cos.

    Several congressmen introduced a bipartisan bill that would impose penalties and restrict sales to Chinese telecom companies that have violated export control or sanctions laws, after the chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies was detained last month in Canada.

  • January 17, 2019

    Skadden First In BigLaw To Be Hit As DOJ Dusts Off FARA

    There’s an old joke among attorneys who have specialized in the Foreign Agents Registration Act: The only people who ever get hit with violations are KGB officers and Washington, D.C., lawyers. Yet BigLaw powerhouse Skadden may have ruined the punchline Thursday with news it had settled FARA allegations brought by the government.

  • January 17, 2019

    DOD Calls For More Interceptors In Missile Defense Plan

    The U.S. Department of Defense released a new missile defense policy Thursday that calls for a significant expansion in U.S. missile defense capabilities, including the acquisition of dozens more missile interceptor systems and improvements in sensor and weapon technologies.

  • January 17, 2019

    Boost Oversight On Military Lending, CFPB Asks Congress

    Under new leadership, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is asking Congress’ help to reassert its oversight over banks’ adherence to the Military Lending Act.

  • January 17, 2019

    US Needs Baseline Privacy Rules, New Watchdog, Groups Say

    A coalition of consumer groups on Thursday pushed Congress to enact baseline federal privacy legislation that would allow states to set more stringent standards and establish a new agency focused solely on privacy and data protection, countering a recently proposed Senate bill that would override state regulations.

  • January 17, 2019

    Ex-VA Head Had Staffer Chauffeur His Wife, Watchdog Says

    Former Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin's use of his driver to transport his wife, sometimes while the driver was off the clock, constituted an ethics violation, according to a VA Office of Inspector General report Thursday that also cleared Shulkin of some allegations that he misused his security detail.

  • January 17, 2019

    4th Circ. Says Cities Can't Sue DOD Over Gun Check Info

    New York City, San Francisco and Philadelphia have no legal standing to sue the U.S. Department of Defense to force it to improve its compliance with obligations to report information on convicted service members to a federal database used for gun background checks, the Fourth Circuit has ruled.

  • January 17, 2019

    Trump Cancels Pelosi Trip As Feud Fuels Shutdown

    President Donald Trump on Thursday canceled Speaker Nancy Pelosi's ability to use military aircraft for a planned trip abroad, as the conflict between the two has escalated this week amid a partial government shutdown.

  • January 16, 2019

    Maxar Faces Stock-Drop Suit Over Inflated Assets, Tech Lies

    Maxar Technologies Inc. has been slapped with a proposed shareholder class action accusing the Colorado space technology company of using its $2.4 billion acquisition of a space imaging business to inflate its assets and hiding problems with one of the vendor’s satellites, causing dramatic stock plunges when the truth came out.

  • January 16, 2019

    Gov't Shutdown Stymies Dormitory Co.'s Fed Contract Case

    A dormitory services company's unfair treatment suit against the U.S. government slowed to a crawl in the Court of Federal Claims when the presiding judge asked the parties whether she should stay the case in light of an appropriations lapse due to the government shutdown.

  • January 16, 2019

    Relaxed Rules Offer Little Clarity On Expanded Drone Flights

    The Federal Aviation Administration's loosening of restrictions on certain drone flights won't spur more drones to take to the skies until regulators draft additional rules to track and identify unmanned aircraft, ensuring the regulatory landscape will remain murky as technology continues to outpace the legal landscape, experts say.

  • January 16, 2019

    9th Circ. Won't Stop Deportation For $50 Given To Terrorists

    The donation of approximately $50 by a Nepalese man to a terrorist organization bars his qualification for obtaining asylum or for ducking deportation, the Ninth Circuit has decided.

  • January 16, 2019

    UK Nat'l Security Official To Lead New Financial Crime Agency

    A high-ranking U.K. national security official with a background in implementing controversial data collection efforts will take the reins of a new economic crime-fighting department, the National Crime Agency said Wednesday.

  • January 15, 2019

    Google, Amazon Urged To Keep Face ID Tech From Feds

    Dozens of advocacy groups joined together Tuesday to push Microsoft, Google and Amazon to refrain from selling face surveillance technology to the federal government, arguing that such a move would undermine public trust in their businesses and hand the government sweeping new power to target immigrants and minorities.

Expert Analysis

  • Diversity's Next Step: Developing Minority Partners

    Chris King.jpg

    The lack of minority partners comes at a high cost to firms, say attorneys at Lightfoot Franklin & White LLC, as they suggest several practical ways to tackle this problem.

  • TSA Pipeline Cybersecurity Road Map: Key Points

    Norma Krayem

    Pipelines are a crucial aspect of the nation's economic and national security. But no one agency has officially been in charge of pipeline cybersecurity — until last month, when the U.S. Transportation Security Administration's cybersecurity road map made clear that the TSA will take the lead role in this area, says Norma Krayem of Holland & Knight LLP.

  • Arbitrators And Mediators Should Reflect Society's Diversity

    James Jenkins

    Alternative dispute resolution providers have made great strides toward diversity, but recent statistics show there is still work to be done. There are certain steps ADR providers can take to actively recruit more women and minority candidates to serve as arbitrators and mediators, says James Jenkins of the American Arbitration Association.

  • Why AFAs Are Key To The Future Of Legal Practice

    Kelly Eisenlohr-Moul

    Alternative fee agreements can help align law firm and client interests, increase efficiency and eliminate corporate extortion, among other benefits. They are the best thing to happen to the practice of law in decades, says Kelly Eisenlohr-Moul at Dinsmore & Shohl LLP.

  • Domestic Sourcing Requirement Doesn’t Fit DOD’s Gloves

    Scott Freling

    A recent Government Accountability Office decision found that a nonavailability exception applied to a Defense Department solicitation for leather combat gloves even though the type of leather at issue was available domestically. The decision sheds light on the regulatory nuances regarding domestic sourcing, say attorneys at Covington & Burling LLP.

  • Opinion

    Eyeballs Are Better Than Border Walls

    Stephen Pazan

    My rough calculations suggest “extreme vetting” of U.S. visa applicants could be as good as building a wall, and the human and economic costs would be much less, says Stephen Pazan, special counsel at Barket Epstein Kearon Aldea and LoTurco LLP and a former consular officer with the U.S. Department of State.

  • Circuits Left To Develop FCA Discovery Case Law

    Andy Liu

    Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court denied certiorari in two major False Claims Act cases, both involving the government’s knowledge or suspicion of violations allegedly resulting in knowingly false claims. Nichols Liu LLP attorneys consider the implications for the materiality standard and FCA cases going forward.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Barron Reviews 'The Clamor Of Lawyers'

    Judge David Barron

    Can lawyers lead a revolution? According to "The Clamor of Lawyers: The American Revolution and Crisis in the Legal Profession" — a slim but elegant volume by Peter Charles Hoffer and Williamjames Hull Hoffer — they can and they did, says First Circuit Judge David Barron.

  • Handling Corporate Congressional Probes In The Trump Era

    John Hellerman

    President Donald Trump’s approach to crisis communications has changed the game enough to demand companies' consideration of a whole new set of options. John Hellerman of Hellerman Communications and Bill Pittard of KaiserDillon PLLC discuss whether corporations can successfully use similar tactics.

  • Opinion

    The Case For Lawyer-Directed Litigation Funding In NY: Part 2

    Peter Jarvis

    Lawyer-directed nonrecourse litigation funding is more likely to protect a lawyer's exercise of independent professional judgment than traditional means of litigation finance, and furthermore enables worthwhile cases that otherwise could not be funded, say Peter Jarvis and Trisha Thompson of Holland & Knight LLP.