Calif. Ruling Clears Up Pay Stub Rules For Company Names

By Kirsten Gallacher (January 17, 2020, 2:32 PM EST) -- California has very specific and numerous wage statement requirements that employers must follow.[1] Litigation based on alleged violations of these requirements has increased in recent years, likely spawned by massive verdicts such as the decision in Magadia v. Wal-Mart Associates Inc. issued by the U.S. District Court of the Northern District of California requiring Wal-Mart Stores Inc. to pay nearly $102 million for noncompliant employee wage statements.[2]  

In particular, California Labor Code Section 226(a) specifies nine items that must be included in a wage statement, one of which is "the name and address of the legal entity that is the employer" set...

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