Wi-Fi Location Ruling Offers Path For Evaluating New Tech

By Allison Grande (November 20, 2012, 10:07 PM EST) -- A Pennsylvania federal judge ruled last week that police officers did not violate the Fourth Amendment when they tracked down a suspected child-pornography distributor through his use of an unsecured Wi-Fi network, a decision attorneys say shows the likely path other courts will take in applying prior U.S. Supreme Court privacy determinations to new technology.

Addressing a novel Fourth Amendment question, U.S. District Judge Joy Flowers Conti ruled Nov. 14 that police had acted lawfully in using a software program called "Moocherhunter" to find the location of a suspect who was using a neighbor's open wireless network, after a lawful search...

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