Commercial Litigation UK

  • October 22, 2021

    US TV, Film Studios Win Blocking Order On Pirate Websites

    A judge granted website blocking orders sought by a group of major American entertainment studios, including Disney and Columbia Pictures, on Friday against six U.K. telecommunications companies, saying the targeted websites authorize the infringement of copyrighted film and television content.

  • October 22, 2021

    Huawei Can't Get £8M Security From Patent Fund In 3G Case

    A judge rejected a Huawei subsidiary's bid to get £8 million ($11 million) in security from a Japanese patent fund suing the Chinese technology giant for allegedly infringing its mobile phone technology, saying Friday it was unlikely the claimant would lose on all points of its case.

  • October 22, 2021

    Hogan Lovells To Face Tycoon's Lost Settlement Claims

    A Ukrainian tycoon will be allowed to argue that failure by Hogan Lovells to secure a freezing order against two former PrivatBank shareholders cost him a chance of a settlement as a High Court judge dismissed the law firm's bid for summary judgment on Friday. 

  • October 22, 2021

    ENRC Says Suspended SFO Employee Was Reporter's Source

    Eurasian Natural Resources Corp. has dragged a suspended Serious Fraud Office investigator into its lawsuit over leaked confidential information regarding an ongoing criminal probe into the Kazakh miner, saying the investigator was a freelance journalist's internal source.

  • October 22, 2021

    EU Court Tosses Russian Steelmaker's Anti-Dumping Move

    The European General Court has rejected an attempt by Russian metals producer Novolipetsk Steel to annul the imposition of European Union anti-dumping duties that it says discriminate against its imports of steel products which are already subject to tariff quotas.

  • October 22, 2021

    Mishcon Says Soccer Club's Appeal Against Player Was Futile

    Law firm Mishcon de Reya has said it is not liable to hand over £20 million ($28 million) to an English soccer club for allegedly missing an appeal deadline with an international sports court as the team would have lost the case anyway.

  • October 22, 2021

    'Whiplash' Portal Handles 45K Claims In First 3 Months

    The U.K. government said Thursday that an online portal for processing so-called whiplash injury cases following the introduction of civil justice reforms has handled 45,718 claims in its first three months of operation.

  • October 22, 2021

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen the U.K.'s competition watchdog take legal action to force holiday refunds, a pension provider take administration steps amid regulatory scrutiny, and a law firm sue the company behind proposals for a new theme park in southern England. 

  • October 22, 2021

    Insurer Wins Bid To Expand Defense In £6M Law Firm Dispute

    A judge has given the Axis insurance group permission to expand its defense in a £6 million ($8.3 million) lawsuit from Discovery Land Co. LLC over an unpaid judgment sum that the property developer secured against its law firm.

  • October 22, 2021

    Turkish Bank Wins £91M Loan Fight In London

    A major Turkish bank won its claim for more than £91 million ($125 million) against a company based in the Marshall Islands as a London court ruled on Friday that it had failed to defend a debt claim connected to an industrial conglomerate.

  • October 22, 2021

    Bank Fights $7.5M Unpaid Fees Suit From Cantor Fitzgerald

    Indian lender Yes Bank has hit back against a $7.5 million lawsuit filed by Cantor Fitzgerald & Co. over an unpaid finder's fee, saying the financial services company did not actually raise any capital for the bank.

  • October 22, 2021

    5 Questions For Macfarlanes LLP's Matt McCahearty

    Macfarlanes LLP's dispute resolution chief Matt McCahearty talks to Law360 about what he likes most about his career, changes in the U.K.'s legal sector and what he learned from spending a year working in a New York law firm.

  • October 21, 2021

    Tardy Invoices Don't Void VAT Deduction Right, ECJ Rules

    A supplier's late-provided, perfunctory invoices don't nullify a company's right to deduct value-added tax and seek a refund, the European Union's highest court said Thursday in a decision favoring a French maker of industrial pumps.

  • October 21, 2021

    Ship Owner Can Refuse Security Tied To Sanctions Clause

    A judge held Thursday that the owner of a ship damaged in a Suez Canal vessel pileup didn't have to accept a security letter from the responsible ship's insurer after it argued that a sanctions clause made the document "useless."

  • October 21, 2021

    IT Co. Wins Permission To Appeal HP 'Counterfeit' Ink Case

    A High Court judge said on Thursday that a British IT equipment provider can challenge findings that it sold "counterfeit" Hewlett-Packard ink cartridges amid new evidence that HP's in-house detecting tool had validated the products. 

  • October 21, 2021

    Businessman's Son Denies 'Sham' Dealings In £19M Debt Suit

    The son of a Lebanese businessman slapped with a £19 million ($26 million) fraud claim has denied that "sham transactions" were made to put a London property and company shares out of reach of a lender seeking to recover his father's unpaid debts.

  • October 21, 2021

    Sicily Settles Swaps Validity Claim With Japanese Bank

    The government of Sicily has admitted that swaps it agreed with Nomura were valid as it agreed to settle the Japanese investment bank's €1 million ($1.2 million) lawsuit, which it had brought to enforce the terms of an agreement that restructured the region's debts.

  • October 21, 2021

    PwC Denies Negligence Over Audits In £41M Suit

    PricewaterhouseCoopers has hit back at a £41.3 million ($57 million) negligence claim brought by the administrators of a collapsed car dealership, denying allegations that it did not take all reasonable steps when conducting its audits.

  • October 21, 2021

    Lebanese Bank Must Face NHS Doc's $4.2M Suit In UK

    A British doctor can sue a Lebanese lender in England to release $4.2 million stuck in his account after a London court concluded that the bank's efforts to attract customers around the world included the local market.

  • October 20, 2021

    EU Court Tosses Airline's Challenge Of Air Berlin Deals

    The European Union's General Court rejected challenges on Wednesday to easyJet and Lufthansa's purchases of assets from an insolvent Air Berlin, finding that enforcers did not have to consider the individual routes flown by the defunct carrier when authorizing the deals.

  • October 20, 2021

    Apple Argues 3G Patent Not Essential In Patent Appeal

    Apple Inc. urged an English appellate court on Wednesday to overturn a finding that a patent for 3G wireless devices the technology giant is accused of infringing is essential to telecommunications standards.

  • October 20, 2021

    UK Gov't Gets OK For Conditional Deal Before Vodafone Trial

    The U.K. government won tentative permission Wednesday to draw up a £184 million ($254.4 million) contract with Japan's Fujitsu over the running of a secure communications channel ahead of a trial with Vodafone over the bidding process.

  • October 20, 2021

    London Tribunal Wrongly Shifted Burden Of Proof In Job Suit

    A tribunal made a mistake when it decided that an electronics manufacturer had the burden to prove it had not unfairly dismissed an employee because of his manager's disability, an appellate judge ruled Wednesday.

  • October 20, 2021

    SocGen Faces Nepotism Allegations In Lebanese Forex Suit

    The Lebanese branch of Societe Generale will face allegations of nepotism, favoritism and corruption over its approval of money transfers outside the country after a client won permission Wednesday to flesh out a £3 million ($4.1 million) High Court lawsuit.

  • October 20, 2021

    Extra £900M In Lehman Bros. Estate Won't Be Paid Equally

    An appeals court has dashed the hopes of some creditors fighting for £900 million ($1.2 billion) left in the estate of Lehman Brothers, ruling on Wednesday that certain claims for compensation by separate affiliates took priority over other creditors.

Expert Analysis

  • What SEP Holders Can Take Away From UK's Apple Ruling

    Author Photo

    A U.K. court's recent decision in the standard essential patent dispute between Apple and Optis Cellular Technology provides encouragement for SEP owners litigating their portfolios in the U.K. and reaffirms the country's place as a patentee-friendly jurisdiction, says Tess Waldron at Powell Gilbert.

  • Complex Fraud Ruling Clarifies Abuse Of Process Jurisdiction

    Author Photo

    The U.K. Court of Appeal’s recent judgement in Regina v. Jones — allowing prosecution of the complex fraud case to continue — provides important guidance on trial judges’ proper use of the abuse of process jurisdiction in the context of private prosecution, says David Corker at Corker Binning.

  • The Rise Of Climate Change Litigation In Europe

    Author Photo

    European courts are an increasingly popular arena for preventative environmental litigation because they can give judgments that have immediate and binding effects on member states and international companies, making it imperative for companies to comply with and exceed environmental standards, say Sylvie Gallage-Alwis and Stephanie Eaton at Signature Litigation.

  • Policyholder Outlook Following UK Biz Interruption Test Case

    Author Photo

    In the nine months since the U.K. Supreme Court ruled in favor of policyholders in the Financial Conduct Authority’s test case on insurance coverage for COVID-19 businesses interruption claims, similar lawsuits filed against insurers show that a positive outcome for insureds is not guaranteed, say Peter Sharp and Paul Mesquitta at Morgan Lewis.

  • How UK Data Breach Ruling May Rein In Insurance Claims

    Author Photo

    The recent U.K. High Court ruling in Warren v. DSG Retail, which held that claimants can only pursue personal data claims provided for in data protection legislation, narrows the basis upon which claims can be made following a data breach, and could make lower-cost recovery of after-the-event insurance premiums a thing of the past, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Takeaways On Noncompete Pacts From UK Top Court Ruling

    Author Photo

    The recent U.K. Supreme Court holding in Harcus Sinclair v. Your Lawyers provides a helpful synopsis of factors to be considered in determining whether the beneficiary of a restraint of trade undertaking has legitimate interests to protect, say David Fisher and Pooja Dasgupta at CM Murray.

  • Takeaways On Pre-Action Protocols From UK Patent Ruling

    Author Photo

    The U.K. High Court's recent patent ruling in Add2 Research v. dSpace instructs parties in proper pre-action discussions that avoid breaches of protocol, including how to provide materials in confidence, say Angela Jack and Emily Atherton at EIP.

  • Grant Thornton Ruling May Broaden Advisers' Duty Of Care

    Author Photo

    The U.K. Supreme Court's ruling in Manchester Building Society v. Grant Thornton will affect other professional negligence cases as it downgraded the scope of duty test and will provide more flexibility for judges in deciding similar cases now that they have been released from the 1997 SAAMCO precedent, says Robin Henry at Collyer Bristow.

  • Arbitral Enforcement Takeaways From Kazakh Asset Ruling

    Author Photo

    While a Belgian court's recent decision in Stati v. Kazakhstan to uphold a freeze on Kazakhstan's assets sets a precedent in favor of arbitral award enforcement, it still highlights the difficulties of investor-state arbitration, and shows that investors' need to launch new proceedings may ultimately depend on the approach of the relevant jurisdictions, says Tomas Vail at Vail Dispute Resolution.

  • Prospects Look Strong For UK Class Actions

    Author Photo

    Class actions have become more commonplace in the U.K. and elsewhere in Europe amid high returns, and the trend is expected to continue in areas as diverse as competition, environmental, data privacy and securities, with some busy years ahead, say Edward Coulson and Rachel Ziegler at BCLP.

  • What The Financial Markets Might Look Like After Libor

    Author Photo

    As the long-awaited transition out of Libor via alternative reference rates such as the Sterling Overnight Index Average edges closer, several long-term uncertainties and inherent litigation risks remain, with legacy contracts and misseling claims among the key areas of concern, say Alexander Edwards and Hannah Sharp at Rosling King.

  • The UK Bribery Act At 10, And What's Next

    Author Photo

    Lauded as a gold standard that put the U.K. in step with modern commercial practices, the Bribery Act turns 10 years old with just a few unmet goals, mostly at the prosecutorial end — and those charged with enforcement will likely face some real tests in the next decade, says Anneka Randhawa at White & Case.

  • UK Employment Case May Lead To New Discrimination Suits

    Author Photo

    The recent Maya Forstater case before the U.K. Employment Appeals Tribunal, concerning whether gender-critical beliefs are a protected characteristic, could provoke an influx of discrimination cases on the basis that philosophical beliefs could trump other protected characteristics, says Jules Quinn at King & Spalding.

  • An Underused Group Litigation Tool Could Help UK Claimants

    Author Photo

    Though the Financial Markets Test Case Procedure has only been used as a collective redress mechanism for the first time recently in Financial Conduct Authority v. Arch Insurance, hopefully it will be called on more often to resolve future post-Brexit issues and other pandemic cases, says Becca Hogan at Signature Litigation.

  • Warnings And Guideposts From EU Sanctions Blocking Case

    Author Photo

    An advocate general's recent opinion in Bank Melli Iran v. Telekom Deutschland, a European Union sanctions blocking case, highlights serious new international regulatory compliance risks but also presents helpful guidance for navigating conflicting EU and U.S. rules, say Thomas Grant at Cambridge University and Scott Kieff at George Washington University.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!