Employment UK

  • December 01, 2022

    BP Can't Ax IT Worker's Race Bias Suit

    A tribunal has refused to dismiss a Black IT worker's claims that BP fired him because of his race, saying it needed a full hearing to weigh whether there is merit to his allegations or whether he was fired for poor performance.

  • December 01, 2022

    Unilever Gets 2nd Shot To Fight Payout To Finance Director

    A Unilever subsidiary won another chance Thursday to challenge a compensation payout to a former finance director who claimed to have been passed over for a promotion after exposing a secret affair an executive was having with another employee.

  • December 01, 2022

    Restaurant Must Pay Couple £125K For Homophobic Abuse

    A London tribunal has awarded £125,000 ($153,000) to a gay couple who worked in a failed restaurant for being discriminated against and harassed due to their sexual orientation.

  • December 01, 2022

    Trainee Solicitor Prevails In Contract Spat With Firm

    A high street law firm breached its contract with a trainee solicitor when it made changes to his place of work four days before he began working at the firm, an employment tribunal has ruled.

  • December 01, 2022

    Pension Scheme Liable For Claim Over Alleged Offshore Scam

    A Gibraltar-based pension scheme will face British investors' claims it was negligent in accepting pension transfers from an unregulated firm in Cyprus that allegedly scammed them, an appeals court has ruled, in a significant decision for consumers' claims against offshore companies.

  • December 01, 2022

    UK Public Increasingly Willing To Join Class Actions

    British consumers are more willing than ever to join class actions against companies that breached national laws, especially in the energy and finance industries, according to a report by a British research agency published Thursday.

  • December 01, 2022

    CMS Guides Musicans' Union On £13M Pension Deal

    A trade union for musicians has offloaded £13 million ($16 million) of its pension liabilities to Aviva PLC, the insurance giant said on Thursday, in a deal advised by CMS Cameron McKenna Nabarro Olswang LLP.

  • December 01, 2022

    FCA Floats Rules For Operators Of Online Pensions Portals

    The Financial Conduct Authority proposed rules on Thursday for companies operating and providing services for the long-awaited online pension program, saying that a robust framework would protect consumers in the new market.

  • December 01, 2022

    FCA Sets Out Cash Warning Plans For Personal Pensions

    Pension providers will be required to warn customers about the effect of inflation on their cash savings under new rules outlined by the Financial Conduct Authority on Thursday.

  • November 30, 2022

    Gov't Plan For Solicitor Legal Aid Fees Draws Criticism

    The government laid out plans Wednesday to increase legal aid funding, but the Law Society promptly argued the move would effectively reduce legal aid rates for criminal solicitors by only offering an 11% increase after years of stagnation amid double-digit inflation.

  • November 30, 2022

    Widows Challenge Cutoff Rules For Police Pensions

    Police widows urged the Court of Appeal on Wednesday to rule that current pension rules violate European human rights law by depriving them of the right to remarry.

  • November 30, 2022

    Gove Taken Off Of HMRC Staffer's Disability Bias Suit

    A former employee of the U.K.'s tax body cannot bring a disability discrimination suit against MP and Leveling Up Secretary Michael Gove, and should instead bring it against the Cabinet Office, the Employment Tribunal has ruled.

  • November 30, 2022

    Norway Oil Co. Firing Of Absent Worker Is Ruled Justified

    An accountant for a Norwegian national oil company was fired because of repeated absences and not for speaking up about being sexually harassed, the Employment Tribunal has ruled.

  • November 30, 2022

    Law Body Backs Plans For Senior-Level Diversity Parity

    The Law Society gave its support on Wednesday to plans set out by a government-backed taskforce that aims to see at least half of senior leaders in the country's financial and professional services coming from less-affluent backgrounds by 2030.

  • November 30, 2022

    Eversheds, CMS Guide £1.7B Pension Deal For Balfour Beatty

    Construction giant Balfour Beatty has offloaded £1.7 billion ($2 billion) of its pension risk to insurer Zurich UK and SCOR SE of France in a deal guided by Eversheds Sutherland and CMS Cameron McKenna Nabarro Olswang LLP.

  • November 30, 2022

    Investment Firm Julius Baer Fined £18M Over Forex Fraud

    Britain's financial watchdog said Wednesday it has fined Julius Baer International £18 million ($21. 6 million) and banned three of its former managers after concluding that it paid improper introducer fees to an employee at a now-defunct Russian oil company.

  • November 29, 2022

    Recovery Firms Fight Ex-Employees Over Billionaire's Assets

    Companies hired by a deceased Georgian billionaire's family to recover his assets battled at the Court of Appeal Tuesday to overturn a ruling that three former employees are entitled to a $45 million slice of the funds.

  • November 29, 2022

    FRC Manager Was Unfairly Dismissed, Tribunal Rules

    An employment tribunal has ruled that the accounting watchdog unfairly dismissed a learning and development manager by failing to offer her a different position when it decided to phase out her job as part of an overhaul.

  • November 29, 2022

    Purported CFO Loses Dismissal Claim Over Consultant Status

    An employment tribunal has tossed a consultant's unfair dismissal suit against an app maker, finding that it had no jurisdiction because he wasn't an employee of the company, though he believed he served as chief financial officer.

  • November 29, 2022

    Ireland Lifts Financial Crisis Banking Pay Restrictions

    Irish ministers said on Tuesday that they will lift some restrictions on bankers' pay and bonuses introduced after the 2008 global financial crash, as the government seeks to end reported recruitment difficulties at three of the country's lenders.

  • November 29, 2022

    Law Firm Owner Hit With Fine For Accounting Failures

    A tribunal in London has hit the owner of a law firm with a £5,000 ($6,000) fine for a litany of bookkeeping failings after she admitted there were "massive holes" in her accounting knowledge.

  • November 29, 2022

    Catholic Order To Pay Carer Forced Out Without Warning

    A judge has awarded £9,000 ($11,000) to a former employee of an adult care home owned by a Catholic order, finding she was asked to attend a meeting to discuss mistakes made on the job without a proper explanation that it was a disciplinary hearing.

  • November 29, 2022

    Worker Can't Use Disability To Get A Boost In Redundancy

    An appellate tribunal has rejected a youth worker's bid to revive his claim that a local authority failed to accommodate his depression during a collective redundancy process by refusing to "slot" him into a new role without requiring him to attend an interview.

  • November 29, 2022

    Insurers Warned Over Cover For British Steel Pensions Claims

    The financial watchdog has urged insurers to be upfront with advisers on whether professional indemnity coverage will cover them against claims under the British Steel pensions redress scheme.

  • November 28, 2022

    Uber Drivers Sue Over Absent Minimum Wage Guarantees

    Uber drivers have sued the ride-sharing giant in a London court, claiming that the company has failed to pay its drivers minimum wage as required following a landmark ruling clarifying that its drivers are legally "workers" for the company and not independent contractors hired by customers.

Expert Analysis

  • German Labor Court Takes Surprising Stance On Disclosure

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    A German labor court's recent ruling regarding an employer's disclosure of the number and names of employees identified as "severely disabled" will surprise practitioners in the data protection and diversity spaces, who may question the justification for aspects of the decision, say Hannah Disselbeck and Marco Hermann at Fieldfisher.

  • A Look At The Increase In Employee Ownership Trusts

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    The rise in employee ownership trusts has brought certain challenges, but with tax advantages and a proven positive impact on individuals, businesses and regional economies, employee buyouts are set to become more popular and could outstrip mainstream deal activity, says ​​​​​​​Lisa Hayward at Birketts.

  • Employment Ruling Takes A New Look At Settlement Waivers

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    The recent Scottish Employment Appeal Tribunal decision in Bathgate v. Technip U.K. demonstrates that a waiver in a settlement agreement must relate expressly to the circumstances of the individual case, and that it is no longer possible to dismiss a prospective claim simply by including a reference to unfair dismissal or the Equality Act 2010, says David Whincup at Squire Patton.

  • Series

    My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Argue Open-Mindedly

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    Queens College President Frank Wu reflects on how Yale Kamisar’s teaching and guidance at the University of Michigan Law School emphasized a capacity to engage with alternative worldviews and the importance of the ability to argue for both sides of a debate.

  • Employment Ruling Shows Value Of Dismissal Alternatives

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    The recent Employment Appeal Tribunal ruling in Department of Work and Pensions v. Boyers demonstrates that employers should ensure that alternatives have been properly considered before dismissing a disabled employee, since it can be difficult to show that a proportionate approach has been taken in the decision-making process, say Asten Hawkes and Larissa Hawkins at BDB Pitmans.

  • How Proposed Forced Labor Product Ban Affects Biz With EU

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    The European Commission's recently proposed regulation banning products made with forced labor in the European Union highlights the importance for multinational companies to enhance their human rights due diligence programs to meet fast-evolving standards and requirements of doing business in the region, say Sarah Bishop and Paul Mertenskötter at Covington.

  • FCA Pension Scheme Case Highlights Issues Ripe For Reform

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    The Financial Conduct Authority's response to the British Steel Pension Scheme case exposed wider issues within its regulatory approach and could demonstrate the need for industrywide reforms to minimize the risks with transferring out of a pension scheme, say Oliver Reece and Larisa Gordan at PwC.

  • Holiday Entitlement Ruling May Affect Employer Practices

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    Following the recent decision of Harpur Trust v. Brazel, employers may want to consider some practical options and review their processes to ensure that workers with irregular hours receive their paid holiday entitlement, say Alex Fisher and Anna West at Travers Smith.

  • How The Rise Of Brand Activism Is Affecting Employment Law

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    As the choice of employer and its values is increasingly seen as an extension of an employee's personal brand, a number of employment law issues come to the fore, including employers' rights to restrict their employees' behaviors and employees' rights to express their own views, says James Davies at Lewis Silkin.

  • Changes The New UK PM May Bring To Workers' Rights

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    U.K. Prime Minister Liz Truss is considering the removal of a significant number of EU regulations, which could lead to a reduction in rights for workers such as equal pay and holiday pay, arguably going against the principles of the U.K.-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, say Sean Nesbitt and Anneliese Amoah at Taylor Wessing.

  • What New French Whistleblower Law Means For Companies

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    A French law that recently entered into force broadens the definition of whistleblower and simplifies the reporting process, creating a new system that offers added protection but may well increase the number of reports made to authorities, say Alexandre Bisch and Fanny Gauthier at Debevoise.

  • Why Risk-Based Employee Conduct Policies Are Advisable

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    In establishing employee conduct policies, companies should consider the extent to which they are exposed to certain types of risk, such as bribery and corruption, as establishing clear written standards offers a step toward avoiding criminal liability, says Steve Melrose at Bellevue Law.

  • Steps Businesses Can Take To Mitigate AI Discrimination Bias

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    There are risks that artificial intelligence systems can result in actionable discrimination in recruitment and employment processes, and to mitigate bias businesses should ensure there is informed human involvement, putting in place suitable policy frameworks to reflect their values and positions on diversity, says David Lorimer at Fieldfisher.

  • New FCA Listing Rules May Start Regulatory Shift On Diversity

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    Listed companies that fail to meet new Financial Conduct Authority rules for minimum executive board diversity currently risk reputational damage mainly through social scrutiny, but should prepare for potential regulatory enforcement actions, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • The Case For Company-Directed Offensive ESG Litigation

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    Rather than treat environmental, social and governance litigation as a source of liability, there is a serious benefit for companies and their lawyers to evaluate and pursue offensive ESG litigation, says Bob Koneck at Woodsford.

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