Employment

  • September 02, 2021

    Former Ga. DA Indicted For Handling Of Ahmaud Arbery Case

    A former district attorney in southern Georgia was indicted Thursday in relation to her handling of the death of Ahmaud Arbery, a young Black jogger gunned down by three white men in an alleged hate crime.

  • September 02, 2021

    4th Circ. Says NC Must Face Trans Health Coverage Suit

    A North Carolina state health plan is not immune from a suit lodged by state employees who say its exclusion of gender transition services was discriminatory, the Fourth Circuit said.

  • September 02, 2021

    Lab Maker Says Ex-Exec Stole 10,000 Docs For New Employer

    Sterile laboratory maker AES Clean Technology Inc. has sued a former operations manager for allegedly stealing more than 10,000 confidential documents for his new employer, a direct rival that it has separately litigated against.

  • September 02, 2021

    Weil Adds Proskauer Rose Labor Litigator In NY

    Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP on Wednesday announced the appointment of a lateral from Proskauer Rose LLP as the new head of employment litigation based in New York.

  • September 02, 2021

    Sanford Heisler Delays Office Reopening To January

    Civil rights firm Sanford Heisler Sharp LLP has delayed its office reopening to January 2022, given the recent surge throughout the U.S. in COVID-19 cases associated with the delta variant.

  • September 01, 2021

    Ford Dealer's Insurer Wants Out Of Suit Over Worker's Killing

    Employers Assurance Co. told a California federal court Wednesday that it doesn't have to pay for the settlement of a suit brought by the family of a Ford dealership employee who was killed by a co-worker, since the employer's liability coverage specifically excludes damages arising out of an employee's termination.

  • September 01, 2021

    Former Ute Manager Says Tenth Circ. Must Rethink Nixing Suit

    A former manager for the Ute Indian Tribe has asked a Tenth Circuit panel to revisit its decision to toss his employment contract suit, saying he shouldn't have to exhaust his remedies with the tribe because he doesn't have a fair chance to get his claims resolved by the tribe's courts.

  • September 01, 2021

    Eli Lilly Favors Millennial Applicants, Older Job Seekers Say

    Eli Lilly & Co. illegally discriminates against older, more experienced applicants for pharmaceutical sales representative positions by favoring younger hires, according to a potential class and collective action filed Wednesday in Indiana federal court.

  • September 01, 2021

    Snyder's-Lance Can't Decertify Snack Workers In FLSA Row

    An opt-in class of more than 300 delivery drivers for the Snyder's and Lance snack-food companies had enough in common to avoid being broken up into individual cases, a North Carolina federal judge ruled Wednesday.

  • September 01, 2021

    DOJ Gets Time At 11th Circ. For Burger King No-Poach Appeal

    The Eleventh Circuit will let the U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division participate in oral argument for an appeal from a proposed class of Burger King workers trying to revive their suit over the fast-food chain's past use of no-poach provisions in its franchise agreements.

  • September 01, 2021

    DOJ Says Poultry Execs Must Face Price-Fixing Charges

    Federal prosecutors are fighting to preserve criminal charges accusing poultry executives of price-fixing in the broiler chicken industry, telling a Colorado federal judge that the indictment has all the specific and timely allegations necessary under federal antitrust law.

  • September 01, 2021

    Amazon Wants NJ Pot Policy Challenge Nixed

    Amazon has urged a New Jersey federal judge to toss a proposed employment class action brought by an applicant whose job offer was rescinded after a positive marijuana test, arguing that the statute the company is accused of violating had not yet taken effect at the time.

  • September 01, 2021

    Lowenstein Sandler Atty Targeted In NJ Virus 'Favor' Suit

    A former New Jersey health official is looking to pull the governor's chief of staff and a Lowenstein Sandler LLP attorney into his whistleblower suit alleging he was fired for objecting to collecting COVID-19 test samples from the chief of staff's relatives, saying the state has admitted that they "orchestrated" his termination.

  • September 01, 2021

    Texas Judge Holds Sex Addiction Is Not a Disability

    A Texas federal judge held that a diagnosis of sex addiction isn't recognized as a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act in dismissing a former Careington International Corp. information technology director's lawsuit alleging she was fired after disclosing her diagnosis.

  • September 01, 2021

    Pa. Gas Investor Says Ex-Manager Refused To Cede Power

    The founder of a Pennsylvania oil and gas exploration company has refused to cede control to new managers appointed by investors in the company, according to a lawsuit the investors filed in Pennsylvania state court.

  • September 01, 2021

    Vizquel Accuser Didn't Report Alleged Harassment, Team Says

    A minor league affiliate of the Chicago White Sox told an Alabama federal judge Tuesday that an autistic former bat boy can't sue the team over alleged sexual harassment by its onetime manager Omar Vizquel because the ex-employee never officially reported the incident. 

  • September 01, 2021

    Checkr Reaches $4.6B Valuation After New $250M Funding

    Background screening company Checkr Inc., advised by Cooley, said Wednesday that it has achieved a valuation of $4.6 billion after securing $250 million from a group of investors led by Durable Capital Partners LP.

  • August 31, 2021

    Team Differences Block Class Cert. In NFL Painkiller Suit

    A California federal judge declined to certify a class of former football athletes who allege the NFL forced them to take painkillers to keep playing, ruling Tuesday that differences in teams' approaches make nonclass litigation more efficient than a class action.

  • August 31, 2021

    NJ Cops Lose Challenge To Health Benefits Contributions

    A New Jersey state appeals court dealt a final blow to a lawsuit lodged by Trenton police officers seeking to change a state mandate requiring officers to contribute to their health benefits plan premiums based on their salary instead of their temporary disability benefits.

  • August 31, 2021

    Court Security Officers Union Can't Sue Over COVID Measures

    A court security officers union cannot sue the U.S. Marshals Service and a contractor over their COVID-19 precautions, a New York federal judge has ruled, saying the suit only mentioned harm to individual members rather than the union itself.

  • August 31, 2021

    Class Attys Get $152M As Sutter Settles Antitrust Case In Calif.

    A California judge has given final approval to a $575 million deal Sutter Health reached with private litigants and the state attorney general to resolve long-running antitrust claims, agreeing to $152 million in class attorney fees.

  • August 31, 2021

    What To Know About Texas' New Sexual Harassment Laws

    On Wednesday, a set of new laws will take effect in Texas that expand sexual harassment protections for employees in the workplace, including making the state's laws stronger than federal statutes in some ways. Here, Law360 breaks down what's essential to know about this under-the-radar legislation.

  • August 31, 2021

    Paper Wants 3rd Circ. To Say If 1st Amendment Bars Bias Suit

    The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette asked to go straight to the Third Circuit for a ruling on whether the First Amendment protected it from liability when it refused to let a Black reporter cover Black Lives Matter protests because of a tweet, arguing the district court was wrong to claim it could have been a personnel decision.

  • August 31, 2021

    NortonLifeLock Beats Investor Suit Over Board Diversity

    A California federal judge has dismissed shareholder derivative claims against NortonLifeLock Inc. that accused the cybersecurity giant's board of failing to uphold its stated commitment to diversity and inclusion.

  • August 31, 2021

    Calif. Health Giant Sutter To Pay $60M To End FCA Claims

    Sutter Health has agreed to pay $60 million to put to rest a False Claims Act suit alleging that the California-based health services provider billed for unsupported diagnoses of Medicare Advantage beneficiaries, according to a settlement announced Monday.

Expert Analysis

  • How Gov't FCPA Hiring Practices Theory May Pan Out In Court

    Author Photo

    In recent settlements with banks, U.S. authorities have taken the position that providing a job or even an unpaid internship to relatives or friends of foreign officials is a violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, but it is worth assessing how this theory would fare in individual prosecutions, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • The Pandemic's Bright Spots For Lawyers Who Are Parents

    Author Photo

    The COVID-19 crisis has allowed lawyers to hone remote advocacy strategies and effectively represent clients with minimal travel — abilities that have benefited working parents and should be utilized long after the pandemic is over, says Chelsea Loughran at Wolf Greenfield.

  • Opinion

    Revise Mansfield Diversity Mandates To Also Benefit Veterans

    Author Photo

    The well-intentioned efforts and salutary purposes of the legal industry's Mansfield Rule diversity metric are tainted by the Diversity Lab initiative's omission of veterans, who are underrepresented at large law firms and entitled to advantageous treatment based on more than 200 years of public policy, says Robert Redmond at McGuireWoods.

  • Opinion

    Leverage The National Interest Waiver To Help US Economy

    Author Photo

    Understanding the intricacies and complexities of the national interest waiver, and positioning this immigration benefit to foreign nationals who are likely to create jobs for U.S. workers in health care, technology and other fields, are integral to post-pandemic economic recovery, says Miatrai Brown at Hayman Woodward.

  • Lessons From Key Expert Testimony In Chauvin Trial

    Author Photo

    During the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, pulmonologist Martin Tobin gave a gripping account of the cause of George Floyd’s death, engaging jurors in creative ways and bringing five important lessons for lawyers preparing expert witnesses, say Harlan Prater and Logan Matthews at Lightfoot Franklin.

  • Why The Future Law Firm Model Is Industry-Based Offerings

    Author Photo

    Multidisciplinary, industry-based groups at law firms allow for more holistic legal advice, lead to sustainable client relationships, and are likely to replace practice group monoliths at many firms, say Jennifer Simpson Carr at Furia Rubel, Timothy Corcoran at Corcoran Consulting and Mike Mellor at Pryor Cashman.

  • Enforcement Takeaways From ABA Antitrust Meeting

    Author Photo

    Although many are calling for sweeping changes to antitrust laws, virtual sessions of the American Bar Association's 69th Antitrust Law Spring Meeting reveal that state and federal enforcers are already able to challenge big tech, acquisitions of small, nascent competitors, and wage-fixing and no-poach agreements, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Thought Leadership's Critical Role In Law Firm Diversity

    Author Photo

    Minority attorneys are often underrepresented in conferences, media interviews and other law firm thought leadership campaigns, which affects their visibility with potential clients and their ability to advance at their firms, says John Hellerman at Hellerman Communications.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Offers Defendants Hope On Remand Appeals

    Author Photo

    The Ninth Circuit's recent decision in Academy of Country Music v. Continental Casualty comes as welcome news for defendants in many types of litigation because it outlines a possible avenue for appeal when an attempt to remove a case from state court to federal court has resulted in a remand order, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Opinion

    The Right Approach To Personal Jurisdiction In Class Actions

    Author Photo

    Since the U.S. Supreme Court's 2017 decision in Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. v. Superior Court, three approaches to personal jurisdiction over absent class members have emerged in the lower courts, but only one comports with due process and limitations on procedural devices imposed by the Rules Enabling Act, say David Kouba and Andreas Moffett at Arnold & Porter.

  • Opinion

    It's Time To Modernize Amateurism In College Sports

    Author Photo

    Recent U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments in a case challenging the NCAA’s freedom from antitrust constraints — together with proposed federal legislation and U.S. Golf Association rules favorable to student-athletes — signal a coming, needed sea change in the definition of amateurism in college sports, says Geoffrey Lottenberg at Berger Singerman.

  • What Associates Should Consider Before Switching Practices

    Author Photo

    The current high demand for midlevel associates provides them a rare opportunity to potentially explore new practice areas, but associates should first ask themselves six questions to begin figuring out why a change sounds appealing, says Stephanie Biderman at Major Lindsey.

  • 4 Effective Ways To Prioritize Client Advocacy

    Author Photo

    To truly support a client going through a complicated lawsuit or a painful experience, lawyers must think beyond interpreting legal guidelines and navigating court proceedings, says attorney Scott Corwin.

  • Remote Law Firm Culture Should Prioritize Associate Training

    Author Photo

    Due to the pandemic, the gap between law school and the first day on the job has never been wider, but law firms can leverage training to bridge that intimidating gap and convey the unique value of their culture in a virtual environment, say Melissa Schwind at Ward and Smith, and William Kenney and Jaron Luttich at Element Standard.

  • Virtual Litigation May Unravel The Narcissistic Lawyer

    Author Photo

    The virtual courtroom limits a narcissistic lawyer's ability to intimidate witnesses and opposing counsel, boast to clients or engage in grandstanding — an unexpected benefit of the global pandemic as some aspects of remote litigation are likely here to stay, says Jennifer Gibbs at Zelle.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Employment archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!