Employment

  • May 03, 2022

    Qualcomm Settles Trade Secrets Suit Against Ex-Engineer

    Qualcomm Technologies Inc. has informed a California federal judge that it settled a trade secrets suit against a former engineer, resolving claims that he swiped confidential company know-how for a rival technology developer.

  • May 03, 2022

    Ga. College Wants Ex-Staffer's Bias Case Axed

    A college administrator did not face retaliation for complaining about sexual harassment because plans to terminate her predated any reports of misconduct, the Georgia public university system told a federal court.

  • May 03, 2022

    GM Urges 2nd Circ. To Nix Black Manager's Race Bias Suit

    General Motors told the Second Circuit not to revive a suit accusing the company of undermining a Black supervisor because of her gender and race, saying her reassignment upon returning from sick leave wasn't a demotion and couldn't be the basis for a discrimination suit.

  • May 03, 2022

    Feds Expand Grace Period For Migrant Work Permit Renewals

    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services gave noncitizens with work permits set to expire or recently expired some breathing room on Tuesday, increasing a grace period after authorizations expire to 540 days in an attempt to combat agency backlogs.

  • May 03, 2022

    Gibson Dunn Wants Fees After Soccer Co.'s Noncompete Win

    A co-founder of the soccer promotion company run by Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross is wrongly refusing to pay some $300,000 in attorney fees despite a court ruling that he breached a noncompete, Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP told a federal judge on Monday.

  • May 03, 2022

    Harvard Case Should End Race In Admissions, Top Court Told

    A group seeking to end the use of race in the college admissions process through lawsuits against Harvard University and the University of North Carolina asked the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down a landmark affirmative action case.

  • May 02, 2022

    Apple Says Chip Startup, Ex-Employees Stole Trade Secrets

    A chipmaker startup hired away dozens of Apple's former engineers and then instructed at least some of them to rip off key trade secrets for use at their new company, the tech giant said in a California federal court complaint Friday.

  • May 02, 2022

    ITC To Probe Drug Cos. Accused Of Using Medytox Secrets

    The U.S. International Trade Commission announced Monday that it has agreed to investigate Medytox's claims that anti-wrinkle drug imports allegedly use the medical aesthetic provider's proprietary biotechnology.

  • May 02, 2022

    W.Va. High Court Reaffirms Miner's Suspension Over CBD Use

    The West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals said the state's Miners' Health Safety Office was right to suspend a coal miner after a positive marijuana drug test since state law does not differentiate between CBD and THC in workplace drug testing, so the consumption of a CBD product cannot be used as a legal defense.

  • May 02, 2022

    MLB Bat Company Founder Wants Judge To Toss IP Suit

    The founder of a Major League Baseball equipment supplier urged a Florida federal judge Friday to toss a suit accusing him of selling his company to former New York Mets player Yoenis Céspedes and launching a competing business using the same intellectual property, arguing that the claims are meritless and the court has no jurisdiction over him.

  • May 02, 2022

    Ex-Scientologists Sue Church Claiming Forced Labor, Abuse

    Three individuals raised in Scientology are suing the church, its leader and several affiliated corporations claiming they violated the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act by forcing them to work in abusive conditions without pay aboard the church's cruise vessel and at its headquarters in Clearwater, Florida.

  • May 02, 2022

    'Inflammatory' Closing Upends $3.1M Union Pacific Verdict

    An Illinois appellate panel has overturned a $3.14 million jury verdict against Union Pacific in a lawsuit brought by an ex-employee who claimed he was physically battered by his supervisor, saying his counsel's "inflammatory and improper" closing argument denied the railroad a fair trial.

  • May 02, 2022

    Cos. Fight Union Pension Fund's $24M Bill After Hotel Closed

    Four companies affiliated with the shuttered Roosevelt Hotel in Manhattan have denied that they owe more than $24 million to a pension fund for unionized hotel workers, urging a New York federal judge to dismiss them from an Employee Retirement Income Security Act lawsuit seeking the money.

  • May 02, 2022

    Personal Injury Firm Failed To Pay Paralegals OT, Suit Says

    A Georgia-based personal injury law firm failed to pay overtime to paralegals who regularly worked more than 40 hours per week, a former paralegal said Monday in a proposed collective action in federal court.

  • May 02, 2022

    Georgia Power Says Contractor Liable Over Dam Diver's Death

    Georgia Power Co. says it is not responsible for the death of a commercial diver at one of its dams and is seeking indemnification from a North Carolina contractor that employed the man.

  • May 02, 2022

    Chinese Citizen Convicted Of Stealing GSK Trade Secrets

    A federal jury on Friday convicted a Swiss scientist who is also a Chinese national of stealing pharmaceutical trade secrets from GlaxoSmithKline to benefit Chinese government-funded companies controlled by himself and his sister, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

  • May 02, 2022

    Ex-Dolphins Coach Rips Arbitration Bid In Race-Bias Suit

    A former Miami Dolphins head coach who was fired despite his success argued Monday against arbitrating his suit claiming systemic racism in the NFL, calling it "unconscionable" that the league is seeking to adjudicate the matter behind closed doors.

  • May 02, 2022

    Biden Admin. Defends Federal Contractor Minimum Wage Hike

    The Biden administration has asked a federal judge in Texas to dismiss a lawsuit brought by Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi alleging the president acted outside the scope of his authority when he increased the minimum wage to $15 per hour for federal contractors.

  • May 02, 2022

    End Of Mask Order Moots Legal Challenge, Mass. Justices Say

    Massachusetts' high court on Monday tossed a tax-preparation business owner's challenge to the state's mask mandate as moot, citing the U.S. Supreme Court's indication that federal authority to enact COVID-19 measures "may be more limited than previously thought."

  • May 02, 2022

    Ex-Home Depot Manager Asks Court To Revisit Age Bias Suit

    A former Home Depot manager told the Ninth Circuit that it should bring back his age discrimination suit against the home improvement giant, saying the jury wasn't able to see raw data on the company's fired associates that he said would have shown a pattern of age-based terminations.

  • May 02, 2022

    FCC On Verge Of Settling Long-Running Racial Bias Suit

    A settlement has been reached in a suit by a Black attorney adviser who said the Federal Communications Commission passed her up for a promotion because of her race, but details are still being worked out, a Washington, D.C., federal judge heard Monday.

  • May 02, 2022

    JPMorgan Says VP's Poor Work, Bad Behavior Led To Firing

    JPMorgan Chase Bank NA has asked a New York federal court to end a suit from an attorney and former vice president over employment retaliation, contending that she was fired for poor work performance and abusive behavior.

  • May 02, 2022

    Walmart Gives Workers Stealth Shifts To Fire Them, Suit Says

    Walmart schedules shifts for employees at the end of their medical leave without telling them in order to create a pretext that the retail giant can then use to fire those workers, according to a proposed class action filed in federal court.

  • May 02, 2022

    Lewis Brisbois Snaps Up Sports Labor Expert As Partner

    Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith added a partner who has arbitrated salary disputes for professional athletes and represented university teams on collegiate athletics' most pressing labor issues, as the firm seeks to grow its sports and employment law divisions.

  • May 02, 2022

    Mass. Justices Skeptical Grubhub Drivers Can Skip Arbitration

    Massachusetts' top court on Monday appeared reluctant to exclude Grubhub Inc. drivers from a federal law requiring arbitration of employment disputes, as the lower court ruling on appeal is the only decision in the country that has sided with the workers.

Expert Analysis

  • What Cos. Can Learn From The 2021 FCA Recovery Statistics

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    Attorneys at Winston unpack the recently released U.S. Department of Justice False Claims Act recovery statistics for fiscal year 2021, discuss how they compare to prior years and what companies in an expanding array of industries should expect next.

  • Compliance Takeaways From DOJ Duress Defense Guidance

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's recent Foreign Corrupt Practices Act advisory opinion sheds light on the applicability of the duress defense, which may help companies formulate policies to avoid liability in high-stakes situations, but several unanswered questions about the scope of the defense remain, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • Recent Rulings Show Lawyer Criticism Of Judges Is Perilous

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    Although many lawyers may believe the First Amendment broadly protects their opinions and good faith criticism of judges, recent sanctions decisions from courts across the country suggest lawyers are at greater risk of discipline for criticizing judges than they have been in the past, says John Harris at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • How Ill. High Court Ruling May Further Evolve BIPA Landscape

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    The Illinois Supreme Court’s recent ruling in McDonald v. Symphony Bronzeville Park, holding that the state’s workers' compensation law does not preclude claims for statutory damages under the Biometric Information Privacy Act, clarifies a critical question in BIPA jurisprudence, likely increasing the risk of related litigation, say attorneys at Paul Hastings.

  • Breyer's Role In Courthouse Design Sets A Judicial Template

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    As U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer prepares to retire, his pivotal role two decades ago in the design of the award-winning John Joseph Moakley U.S. Courthouse in Boston demonstrates how the judiciary can engage in civic architecture and specifically the design of courthouses, says Kate Diamond at HDR.

  • ESG Risk Mitigation And Compliance Boosts Company Value

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    Environmental, social and governance investments are now the fastest-growing segment of the financial services industry, which means compliance departments must lead ESG integration to create a consistent, efficient and risk-adjusted return on investment, say Brooke Hopkins at AlixPartners and Evan Singer at Jones Day.

  • BigLaw Must Nix All-Or-Nothing Work Model To Retain Talent

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    Record numbers of workers quitting in the “Great Resignation,” paired with the growing success of nontraditional and freelance legal services, show that BigLaw’s management committees must reconsider rigid billable hour expectations and be open to part-time and noncontinuous work arrangements, says Hui Chen at Hui Chen Ethics.

  • Opinion

    Biden's Supreme Court Nominee Should Have 5 Key Qualities

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    In fulfilling his campaign promise to nominate a Black woman to the U.S. Supreme Court, President Joe Biden should look for candidates with experience as a state trial judge, a background in public education and a few other important characteristics, says Benes Aldana, president of The National Judicial College.

  • Lessons For Trucking Cos. From Colo. Crash Controversy

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    Questions over who is ultimately at fault for a fatal truck crash in Colorado that recently resulted in a life sentence for a trucker highlight the need for trucking companies to review their contracts with drivers, and to understand their responsibilities and protect their interests when crashes occur, say Harsh Arora and Efraim Adler at Kelley Kronenberg.

  • Prep For Possibility Of Virtual I-9 Exams Post-Pandemic

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    As the U.S. Department of Homeland Security considers making pandemic-related policies permanent, including flexibilities on remote employment eligibility verification, now is the time for employers to audit COVID-19 form I-9 practices and correct any missteps, says Margarita Krncevic at Benesch.

  • 2 Recent Decisions Highlight Ambiguity As FCA Defense

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    Recent federal appellate decisions in Schutte v. SuperValu and Sheldon v. Allergan, solidifying an objectively reasonable reading of a statute or regulation as a defense to False Claims Act liability, will make it easier for defendants to obtain early dismissal in run-of-the-mill cases and limit discovery costs in others, says Elisha Kobre at Bradley.

  • Litigation-Ready Caveats For Stock And Asset Purchase Deals

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    Brett Garver and Kelly Schneid at Moritt Hock explore the representations and warranties, post-closing adjustments, arbitration clauses and other provisions that have become more indispensable in pandemic-era post-closing litigation in stock and asset purchase deals.

  • Key Trade Secret Developments Of 2021: Part 2

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    Last year, federal courts issued several important rulings on trade secret issues, including the standard for pleading under the Defend Trade Secrets Act, whether entry of a preliminary injunction stops the accrual of damages, and how nondisclosure agreement survival clauses limit confidentiality obligations, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • How To Navigate Equity Rollovers In A Tight M&A Market

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    As heavy competition for acquisition targets allows buyers to be more flexible in fulfilling their desire for management to roll equity and invest with them, businesses should be mindful that equity rollover transactions, which take many forms, also require thorough review as part of the overall transaction assessment, says Joshua Klein at Neal Gerber.

  • The Flaws In The Traditional Approach To Hiring A Law Firm

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    Trevor Faure at Smarter Law Solutions and Gregory Richter at Major Lindsey offer an inside look at Teva Pharmaceuticals' recent overhaul of its law firm relationships through anonymous grading, and discuss how the company’s surprising findings on the correlation between quality and cost reveal shortcomings in traditional business development.

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