Employment

  • April 22, 2021

    Pilgrim's Pride Sued Over COVID-19 Spouse Deaths

    A Pilgrim's Pride employee hit the meatpacker with a wrongful death suit Wednesday in Texas federal court, accusing the company of placing profits over safety after she contracted COVID-19 on the job and purportedly transmitted the infection to her now-deceased husband.

  • April 22, 2021

    Gilead Whistleblower Dinged For Lost Texts In Kickbacks Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal judge agreed on Thursday to sanction a former Gilead Sciences Inc. employee and his lawyers for failing to take proper steps to preserve text messages at issue in a whistleblower case they're pursuing against the company over alleged kickbacks paid to doctors.

  • April 22, 2021

    Separate Union Spats Could Foil Construction, 3rd Circ. Told

    A New Jersey construction enterprise urged the Third Circuit on Thursday to consolidate its battles with two unions over job territory, arguing that separate arbitrations could lead to conflicting determinations that will grind projects to a halt and put laborers out of work.

  • April 22, 2021

    Construction Co. Manager Cops To $1M Kickback Scheme

    A construction company payroll manager on Thursday copped to his role in a $1 million kickback scheme that cheated workers out of earned pay for their work on public projects, and now faces a probation term and restitution obligations, according to New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir S. Grewal.

  • April 22, 2021

    Judge Nixes Emory Bid To End Blinded Woman's Med Mal Suit

    A Georgia state judge rejected a bid by a metropolitan Atlanta hospital to end a malpractice suit brought by a woman who alleges that she was blinded by a surgeon's reckless decision, saying there were still factual questions to resolve in the dispute.

  • April 22, 2021

    Ex-CBS Worker Blames Atty For Missing Docs In Bias Dispute

    A Black former CBS Sports employee pursuing race discrimination claims urged a New York federal court on Wednesday to reconsider a $5,000 penalty as part of a contempt order, arguing she had no idea her former lawyer had ignored discovery obligations until she brought on new counsel.

  • April 22, 2021

    Mass. Gov. Fired Agency Head For 'Political Cover,' Suit Says

    The former head of the Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing hit Gov. Charlie Baker with a federal suit Wednesday claiming the administration coerced him into apologizing and ultimately fired him after an old photo surfaced of his fraternity alumni allegedly doing a Nazi salute.

  • April 22, 2021

    Ex-Littler Client Wants Substitute From Judge's Old Firm

    After lies from a Littler Mendelson PC partner to an Alabama federal judge resulted in a five-figure sanction for the employment powerhouse and an Atlanta partner being scrubbed from the Littler website, the firm's former client is seeking to substitute in a lawyer from the judge's old law firm.

  • April 21, 2021

    Ill. Judge Blasts Attys While Tossing Biometric Privacy Suit

    An Illinois federal judge criticized Stephan Zouras LLP's investigation and handling of a client's biometric privacy suit as he dismissed the case, saying the attorneys "skirted the line" of sanctionable conduct and "should have pulled back" once significant issues arose. 

  • April 21, 2021

    McDonald's Board Sued Over Ex-CEO's Affair Scandal Losses

    The Teamsters have sued nine McDonald's board members in Delaware's Chancery Court, accusing them of breaching their fiduciary duty when they allowed former McDonald's CEO Stephen Easterbrook to waltz off with a separation package purportedly worth $56 million after being fired for having an improper relationship with a subordinate.

  • April 21, 2021

    Texas Oil & Gas Services Biz Dispute Ends In $31M Verdict

    A Texas state jury found that an oil and gas electrical equipment company's majority owner failed to act in the company's best interest, and awarded about $31 million to a partial owner of the company and to the company itself.

  • April 21, 2021

    DOJ's New No. 3 Faces Delicate Balancing Act

    Vanita Gupta, who was confirmed as the third-highest ranking official at the U.S. Department of Justice on Wednesday, must navigate both Republican opposition and pressure from the left as she seeks to carry out President Joe Biden’s civil enforcement agenda. But attorneys who have worked with her say her collaborative approach and respect for differing views will suit her well in the fights to come.

  • April 21, 2021

    Construction Co. Sues Ex-Director For 'Raiding' Staff, Data

    A Houston-headquartered construction company hit a former employee with a breach of contract suit in Texas federal court Tuesday for allegedly poaching some of the business's top staff and misusing company secrets after he formed a rival firm.

  • April 21, 2021

    MetLife, AIG Sued Over Afghanistan Police Trainer's Death

    The widow of an Illinois civilian contractor who died while training police in Afghanistan sued MetLife and AIG on Wednesday, alleging that the carriers wrongfully rejected her claims under life and accidental death policies worth more than $1 million.

  • April 21, 2021

    Pot Security Company Says Wage Dispute Must Be Arbitrated

    A cannabis security company that has tried to kill a proposed wage class action by arguing that federal labor laws cannot protect employees at a federally illegal business told a Colorado federal judge on Tuesday that one of the worker's disputes belongs in arbitration.

  • April 21, 2021

    Insurer Wins Suit Against Atty Who Took Data To Next Job

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday gave Berkley Insurance Co. a permanent injunction in a suit accusing a Brooklyn lawyer of stealing "massive amounts" of secret data from his job with the insurer before moving to a competitor and subsequently getting fired.

  • April 21, 2021

    Labor Unions Oppose H-2B Visa Increase, Citing 'Abuses'

    Ten labor unions signed a letter urging the heads of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Labor to walk back plans to issue 22,000 additional temporary work visas this year, citing "egregious abuses" within the H-2B program.

  • April 21, 2021

    Munck Wilson Adds Former Jones Day Atty To LA Office

    Texas-based Munck Wilson Mandala LLP announced Tuesday that it has added an experienced litigation partner to the firm's growing Los Angeles office.

  • April 21, 2021

    Senate Confirms Vanita Gupta As Associate AG

    The U.S. Senate confirmed Vanita Gupta as associate attorney general on a nearly party-line vote Wednesday, capping off a contentious fight that saw Republicans blast the civil rights attorney for her past support for decriminalizing drugs and shrinking police forces.

  • April 21, 2021

    Thompson Hine Adds Taylor English Labor Partner In Atlanta

    Thompson Hine LLP hired a labor and employment partner from Taylor English Duma LLP in its Atlanta office, where she'll be helping clients navigate workplace issues stemming from the pandemic.

  • April 20, 2021

    Philips' Chinese Rivals Can't Dodge Ill. Trade Secrets Suit

    A pair of Chinese companies can't escape claims they stole trade secrets related to Philips Medical Systems' X-ray tubes, an Illinois federal judge ruled Monday, saying there is enough evidence supporting the companies' ties to the Prairie State.

  • April 20, 2021

    Euro Soccer 'Super League' May Draw Antitrust Red Cards

    European soccer federations and fans have widely criticized a proposed "super league" as self-interested and against the sport's open competition principles, sparking antitrust concerns that could turn on whether the coalition is viewed as a new competitor disrupting the existing power structure or a threat to restrict the market.

  • April 20, 2021

    Cresco Labs Faces OT Suit Over Workers' Time Donning PPE

    Two former Cresco Labs employees have filed a proposed class and collective action in Illinois federal court alleging the cannabis company failed to compensate workers for time spent putting on and taking off required personal protective equipment.

  • April 20, 2021

    NY Court Admins Sue Union Boss As Chief Judge Faces Depo

    New York state court officials on Monday sued the head of the state court officers association in an effort to overturn an order directing Chief Judge Janet DiFiore to face a deposition at the union boss's disciplinary proceeding.

  • April 20, 2021

    Judge Trims Defective Public Housing Construction FCA Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Monday left intact a whistleblower's claims accusing two construction companies of covering up and submitting false claims for allegedly defective construction work at a federally funded Philadelphia housing project, while tossing claims against the construction management company that fired him.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    US Trade And Domestic Economic Policy Should Align

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    Progressive international trade policy should offer economic benefits not just to U.S. companies competing internationally, but also to the middle class, say Jeff Weiss at Steptoe & Johnson and Livia Lam at Strategies 360.

  • 5 Biden-Era Corporate Compliance Considerations

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    Attorneys at Cleary analyze the priorities, trends and developments that will affect white collar and regulatory enforcement during the Biden administration, as well as key compliance considerations for boards of directors, financial institutions and companies.

  • Remote Bar Exams Pose New Learning Disability Challenges

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    New bar exam formats necessitated by the COVID-19 crisis — going from paper to computer, in-person to remote, human to artificial intelligence proctoring — may exacerbate shortcomings in disability assessments for learning-disabled test takers seeking accommodations, says Rebecca Mannis at Ivy Prep.

  • Liability Questions For Calif. Employers On Vaccine Mandates

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    California employers looking to increase workplace safety by implementing mandatory COVID-19 vaccines should view as warnings both the current state case law on inoculation liability and the lack of federal and local guidance, says Thu Do at Gilson Daub.

  • Prepare For NY Data Privacy Law To Catch Up To Calif.

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    The proposed New York Data Accountability and Transparency Act, along with last year's SHIELD Act, means that the state may soon have comprehensive privacy laws that rival California's, and all businesses with New York customers should take several important compliance steps to prepare, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • Mitigating AML Act Exposure For High-Net-Worth Individuals

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    In light of the recently passed Anti-Money Laundering Act, high-net-worth individuals and politically exposed persons should take precautions to avoid unwarranted scrutiny and criminal liability under the new regime, while protecting their interests and maintaining their anonymity and safety, say Evelyn Sheehan and Jason Short at Kobre & Kim.

  • What Cos. Must Watch Out For When Obtaining PPP Insurance

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    Paycheck Protection Program insurance can address a critical vulnerability for companies if the U.S. Small Business Administration audits their loans, but policyholders should keep in mind that these policies can harbor a number of coverage gaps and problematic conditions, says Ben Massarsky at Miller Friel.

  • 5 Ways To Address Heightened Forced Labor Compliance Risk

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    In response to ever-increasing enforcement efforts targeting forced labor, companies can leverage available resources to assess conditions in their supply chains and avoid unintended imports and exports with entities known for human rights violations, say Joyce Rodriguez and Francesca Guerrero at Thompson Hine.

  • New Ariz. Law Practice Rules May Jump-Start National Reform

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    Arizona's far-reaching new rules opening its legal sector up to nonlawyer participation may encourage other states to follow suit, with both positive and negative consequences for clients, the justice system, legal education and lawyers' careers, say Maya Steinitz at the University of Iowa and Victoria Sahani at Arizona State University.

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: Fewer MDLs, More Actions

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    A critical trend in multidistrict litigation in 2020 was a simultaneous decrease in the number of proceedings and a major increase in the number of individual actions within MDLs — from just over 130,000 at the end of 2019 to more than 340,000 a year later, says Alan Rothman at Sidley.

  • Opinion

    SEC Enforcement Needs New Guiding Principles

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    New leadership at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission should replace the agency’s outdated approach to securities enforcement with one that aggressively punishes fraud and roots out bad actors, but also values regulation and collaboration where there are problems that can be fixed instead of punished, say Ian Roffman and Mark Jensen at Nutter.

  • IP Considerations For Art-Fashion Collaborations

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    Attorneys advising artists in forming collaborations with fashion companies — such as Dior's use of an Amoako Boafo painting in its summer 2021 menswear line — need to carefully negotiate crucial copyright and trademark protections and navigate overbroad restrictive contract provisions, says Vivek Jayaram at Jayaram Law.

  • 10 Tips For Your Next Virtual Court Appearance

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    Many federal and state courts will likely embrace virtual proceedings even after pandemic-related restrictions are lifted, so attorneys should get comfortable with the virtual platforms commonly used by courts, and follow a few audio and video best practices, says Justin Heminger, a senior litigation counsel at the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • Oil And Gas Cos. Must Ensure They Can Back Up ESG Claims

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    As regulator and investors devote increasing attention to environmental, social and governance factors, oil and gas companies must make sure that their ESG-related statements and disclosures match their performance in order to avoid future liability, say Tim Baines and Paul Forrester at Mayer Brown.

  • Predictions For Future PPP Fraud Prosecution By DOJ

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    Paycheck Protection Program fraud involving egregious wrongdoing is likely to remain a major area of interest for the U.S. Department of Justice’s Criminal Division, but, over time, prosecutors will likely pursue more complicated schemes that raise difficult questions about criminal intent, says David Bouchard at Finch McCranie.

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