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Employment

  • November 14, 2018

    Ex-Broker Can't Skirt Prison For NY Pay-To-Play Scheme

    Former New York broker Gregg Schonhorn was sentenced Wednesday to a year and a day in prison for his role in a pay-to-play bribery scheme in which a former New York pension fund director steered more than $3 billion in business from the New York State Common Retirement Fund to corrupt brokers, despite the defendant's "exceptional" cooperation with authorities.

  • November 14, 2018

    9th Circ. Judge Doubts Bio-Rad Appeal Of Ex-GC's $11M Win

    A Ninth Circuit judge appeared skeptical Wednesday of Bio-Rad Laboratories Inc.'s arguments in favor of overturning an $11 million whistleblower judgment against the company, repeatedly questioning its counsel during a hearing on how an erroneous jury instruction would change the outcome of the verdict.

  • November 14, 2018

    Schorsch, Vereit Move Ahead In $18M Chancery Fee Fight

    A Delaware vice chancellor encouraged former real estate mogul Nicholas Schorsch, a Vereit Inc. affiliate and others to soldier on Wednesday in an $18 million fee advancement dispute linked to litigation over the meltdown of American Realty Capital Partners in 2015 

  • November 14, 2018

    Int'l Paper Co. To Face Claim It Fires Workers Pre-Retirement

    International Paper Co. must face a former driver’s claim that the company has a practice of firing workers before they turn 55 to prevent them from collecting early-retirement benefits, a California federal judge ruled Tuesday.

  • November 14, 2018

    United Airlines Investor Says Exec Pay Suit Should Survive

    An investor in United Airlines told a Delaware Chancery Court judge Wednesday that its claims against the company, its directors and former CEO over allegedly excessive compensation given to the executive after he was involved in a bribery scheme should survive because corporate officers shouldn’t be rewarded for bad behavior.

  • November 14, 2018

    Calif. Jury Deadlocks In J-M Bad Pipes Damages Bellwether

    A California federal judge declared a mistrial on Wednesday in a bellwether False Claims Act suit against J-M Manufacturing after a jury deadlocked on the amount the company owes, if any, to a group of municipalities that paid $2.1 million for pipes that weren't uniformly compliant with industry standards.

  • November 14, 2018

    White & Case Revamped Parental Leave Policy For 2018

    White & Case LLP rolled out a new parental leave policy in 2018 for its U.S. offices that offers 12 weeks of paid leave to all legal and business employees regardless of their gender, the firm confirmed on Wednesday.

  • November 14, 2018

    BNSF Gets Quick Win In Ex-Worker's Disability Bias Suit

    BNSF Railway Co. on Wednesday dodged an employee’s suit alleging it effectively fired her by moving her job halfway across the country because she took medical leave, with a Kansas federal judge saying her claims largely derived from “conjecture.”

  • November 14, 2018

    On Appeal, Wash U. Defeats Jury Award In Disability Bias Suit

    A Missouri appeals court reversed a former Washington University employee's win in her suit alleging that she was fired in retaliation for requesting a disability accommodation, ruling that the jury that awarded her $769,000 hadn't been properly instructed.

  • November 14, 2018

    Disney Investor Faces Uphill 9th Circ. Fight In No-Poach Row

    A Ninth Circuit judge on Wednesday appeared unswayed by a Disney shareholder's bid to revive a derivative shareholder lawsuit claiming board members breached their fiduciary duties by agreeing not to poach other studios’ animators, saying during a hearing that “nothing in the complaint says the board knew about this conspiracy.”

  • November 14, 2018

    Tax-Free Travel Payments Count As Wages, 8th Circ. Says

    The Eighth Circuit ruled Wednesday that tax-exempt payments made by Werner Enterprises Inc. to tens of thousands of truck drivers for anticipated travel costs could be used in calculating their pay rates, upholding the dismissal of a class action alleging the payments were wrongly used to offset minimum wages the drivers were owed.

  • November 14, 2018

    Colo. DA Asks State High Court For Atty Fees In Ethics Row

    The former district attorney for a pair of Colorado counties asked the state’s Supreme Court on Wednesday to revive his lawsuit for $300,000 in attorneys’ fees he incurred while fighting ethics complaints brought by the attorney regulatory council, saying the counties must pay for expenses related to his job.

  • November 14, 2018

    Okla. VA Immune From Genetic Bias Claim, Judge Says

    States are immune from suits alleging they violated a federal law blocking employers from discriminating against workers based on their or their family members’ genes, a federal judge said Tuesday in an order dismissing part of a nurse’s suit against the Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs.

  • November 14, 2018

    9th Circ. Creates New Role To Tackle Workplace Harassment

    In a first for the federal judiciary, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit has created the new position of director of workplace relations to confront workplace harassment issues in the appellate, trial and bankruptcy courts within the circuit’s jurisdiction.

  • November 14, 2018

    Immigrants Slap NM Detention Center With $5M Wage Suit

    A putative class of immigrant detainees who claim their wages were stolen by the owner of a privately run detention facility in New Mexico sued the company for over $5 million in Maryland federal court on Wednesday, alleging the facility failed to pay them adequate wages.

  • November 14, 2018

    Port Authority Beats Religious Bias Suit Over Sabbath Shifts

    The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey won't have to face bias claims from a former employee at Newark Liberty International Airport who asked for Fridays and Saturdays off to observe the Jewish Sabbath, a New Jersey federal judge ruled Tuesday, finding the scheduling request would have flouted an existing union contract.

  • November 13, 2018

    Nine West Gets OK To Solicit Votes On Ch. 11 Plan

    Nine West Holdings Inc. received New York bankruptcy court approval Tuesday to solicit votes from creditors on its plan to reorganize in Chapter 11 while certain stakeholders maintain that the fashion company's proposal to settle potential fraudulent transfer claims against owner Sycamore Partners is woefully inadequate.

  • November 13, 2018

    NHL Ends Concussion MDL With $19M Tentative Settlement

    The National Hockey League has agreed to pay nearly $19 million to end multidistrict litigation brought by more than 300 retired players alleging they endured long-term problems from head trauma suffered on the ice, a deal some experts said fell short of expectations after the league put up a stiff defense.

  • November 13, 2018

    US To Pay Contractor $1.1M For SC Nuclear Facility Work

    The National Nuclear Security Administration must pay at least $1.1 million in withheld cash to the company tasked with designing, building and running a now-canceled nuclear fuel facility in South Carolina, the U.S. Court of Federal Claims said Friday.

  • November 13, 2018

    8th Circ. Backs Hospital In EEOC Religious Bias Appeal

    Workers denied religious accommodations can't automatically sue under a provision of federal law barring businesses from retaliating against workers who oppose discrimination, a split Eighth Circuit panel said Tuesday, declining to revive a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit.

Expert Analysis

  • Sekura Case Expands Scope Of Illinois Biometric Privacy Law

    Greg Abrams

    An Illinois state appeals court's recent decision in Sekura v. Krishna Schaumburg Tan appears to break from multiple Biometric Information Privacy Act cases that had required plaintiffs to allege some harm beyond mere technical violations to qualify as “aggrieved,” say attorneys with Faegre Baker Daniels LLP.

  • Simple Secrets For Improving Your CLE

    Daniel Karon

    With few cases going to trial, many attorneys keep their oral-presentation skills sharp by teaching continuing legal education programs. To avoid giving a CLE that falls flat and damages your reputation, you must fashion a thoughtful message, control its presentation, and nail the beginning and ending, says Daniel Karon of Karon LLC.

  • 3 Takeaways From Google’s Harassment Policy Overhaul

    Nisha Verma

    In the wake of the #MeToo movement, Google’s recent changes to its sexual harassment policy are notable because they highlight employers’ ability to innovate while taking measures to comply with California law, say Nisha Verma and Jessica Linehan of Dorsey & Whitney LLP.

  • It’s Time For Law Firms To Start Talking About Gen Z

    Eliza Stoker

    Since the oldest members of Generation Z aren’t even finished with law school yet, law firm management is in a unique position to prepare for their entrance into the legal workforce, says Eliza Stoker of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • Employee Nonsolicitation Terms Now Likely Void In California

    Dylan Wiseman

    In AMN Healthcare v. Aya Healthcare Services, a California appellate court recently held that employee nonsolicitation agreements are void unless they fall within one of three statutory exceptions, clearing up uncertainty about their enforceability in the state, say Dylan Wiseman and Alexandra Grayner at Buchalter PC.

  • AAA Arbitration: An Overview For Employment Lawyers

    Excerpt from Lexis Practice Advisor
    Julia Jordan

    Julia Jordan and Christina Andersen of Sullivan & Cromwell LLP provide guidance on arbitrating employment-related disputes before the American Arbitration Association and summarize what practitioners might expect during various aspects of the process.

  • An Expansion Of Employee ADEA Protections At High Court

    Daniel Pasternak

    The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Mount Lemmon Fire District v. Guido extends Age Discrimination in Employment Act protections to all political subdivisions of states, regardless of size, despite contrary interpretations by many circuits, say Daniel Pasternak and Melissa Legault of Squire Patton Boggs LLP.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: Yale's Linda Greenhouse Talks Journalism

    Linda Greenhouse

    In this series featuring law school luminaries, Yale Law School lecturer and Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Linda Greenhouse discusses her coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court, the conservatives' long game and trends in journalism.

  • Opinion

    Celebrate Veterans By Improving Their Access To Justice

    Linda Klein

    Attorneys should think beyond the Veterans Day parades and use their time and talents to help the many veterans facing urgent legal issues, says Linda Klein of Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz PC.

  • NY Employers Must Prep For New Wage Laws Now

    Randi May

    New York legislation mandating a series of significant wage increases becomes effective at the end of 2018. Employers should make sure their payrolls are in order well before the new year, as violations can result in steep consequences, say Randi May and Amory McAndrew of Hoguet Newman Regal & Kenney LLP.