Energy

  • July 9, 2019

    PG&E Fights To Keep Ch. 11 Discovery From Regulators

    Pacific Gas & Electric Co. urged a California federal judge on Tuesday to issue a protective order limiting the use of evidence produced in its Chapter 11 bankruptcy, but drew objections from state regulators who argued the overly broad proposal would hamstring regulators and whistleblowers.

  • July 9, 2019

    American Wind Cos. Want Tariffs On Imported Wind Towers

    American wind tower companies have taken a beating from foreign wind tower producers selling their products in the U.S. at unfairly cheap prices, a coalition of U.S. producers alleged Tuesday, asking the U.S. government in a petition to level the playing field with tariffs.

  • July 9, 2019

    Marine Surveyor Defeats Insurers' $500M Chevron Rig Suit

    Insurance underwriters for Chevron Corp. cannot hold marine surveyor American Global Maritime Inc. liable for the $500 million they paid to cover losses from the failure of an offshore oil rig built for the energy giant, a Texas federal judge ruled Tuesday, dismissing all remaining counts in the underwriters' suit. 

  • July 9, 2019

    Calif. Electric Co. Beats Firefighter's Suit Over Shock Injury

    A firefighter who suffered a severe electric shock after his fire engine’s ladder struck power lines could not prove Southern California Edison was responsible for his injuries, a California appellate court affirmed Monday, saying the firefighter kept changing his theories of liability.

  • July 9, 2019

    Tribe Wants In On Wash. Suit Over EPA Water Regs

    A Washington tribe has told a federal court that it wants to intervene in the state's suit accusing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency of violating the Clean Water Act by weakening the state's water quality standards at the request of the wood products industry.

  • July 9, 2019

    Ukraine Says Immunity Ruling Addresses Novel Issue

    Ukraine has asked the D.C. Circuit to reclassify its opinion rejecting the country's sovereign immunity defense in litigation to enforce a $112 million arbitral award against it, saying the decision establishes new precedent on a novel issue.

  • July 9, 2019

    Petrobras Selling Natural Gas Biz Over Antitrust Worries

    Brazilian state-owned oil giant Petrobras is exiting the natural gas transportation and distribution business under a deal with the country’s antitrust enforcer addressing abuse of dominance and discriminatory pricing concerns.

  • July 9, 2019

    DOL Botched Miner's Black Lung Award, 10th Circ. Says

    The Tenth Circuit on Tuesday handed Energy West Mining Co. a win in its challenge to a benefits award given to a now-deceased miner claiming his lung disease was caused by his employment, saying a U.S. Department of Labor ruling overlooked a medical expert's opinion.

  • July 9, 2019

    Cloud Peak Investors Push For Ch. 11 Equity Committee

    More than 100 shareholders of coal mining enterprise Cloud Peak have contributed to a letter-writing campaign imploring a Delaware bankruptcy judge to appoint a committee of equity security holders and saying the debtor had undervalued its assets to the detriment of investors.

  • July 9, 2019

    TCEQ Ignored Project's Oil & Gas Impact, Local Gov'ts Say

    A Texas county and city told a state appellate court it overlooked red flags when it affirmed the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality’s approval of an industrial waste disposal facility, saying the project will negatively impact nearby oil and gas drilling.

  • July 9, 2019

    Can Data Solve BigLaw’s Diversity Problems?

    Even the most well-intentioned law firms can struggle to build and retain diverse teams. Those at the cutting edge are finding the answers could lie in their own internal data.

  • July 9, 2019

    12 Attorneys On How Diversity Gives Them The Edge

    Law360 asked lawyers how diverse backgrounds can be an advantage for them and their firms, and the answers poured in. Here are a dozen personal accounts of diversity at work.

  • July 9, 2019

    Refineries Raise Alarm Over USDA Interest In Fuel Waivers

    A group of small refineries on Monday asked the head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to block the U.S. Department of Agriculture from accessing confidential information they submitted in support of petitions for waivers from alternative fuel mandates.

  • July 9, 2019

    Bracewell Adds Energy Finance Atty From Pillsbury

    Bracewell LLP has brought on board to its New York City office a former Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP attorney with decades of experience in energy finance. 

  • July 9, 2019

    'Illegal Rubber Stamp' Nullifies Pipeline Permits, Enviros Say

    Permits issued by the Army Corps of Engineers for a 160-mile-long crude oil pipeline should be vacated because the agency "illegally rubber stamped" risk assessments without properly evaluating the project's impact, an environmental group told a Louisiana federal court.

  • July 9, 2019

    Biggest Energy Decisions So Far In 2019: Midyear Report

    Federal and state officials faced skeptical courts over the scope of their authority in the biggest energy-related court decisions in the first half of 2019, from FERC being elbowed out of utility bankruptcy cases and warned to step up its climate change reviews to President Donald Trump's efforts to open up more areas to offshore drilling running aground. Here are some notable energy-related decisions from the first half of 2019.

  • July 9, 2019

    EQT Must Pay For Underground Gas Storage, Landowners Say

    More than 100 Pennsylvania landowners in Allegheny, Greene and Washington counties said EQT Corp. has improperly stored natural gas beneath their homes without paying them, according to a proposed class action complaint filed Tuesday in Pittsburgh federal court.

  • July 9, 2019

    2 Former Platinum Execs Convicted Of Fraud, Ex-CFO Walks

    A New York federal jury convicted two former top executives of Platinum Partners of fraud and conspiracy Tuesday, but acquitted the defunct hedge fund’s ex-chief financial officer of charges stemming from a purported scheme to defraud investors in Platinum’s flagship fund.

  • July 9, 2019

    Columbia Gas Settles Claim Over Mass. Explosion Death

    The family of an 18-year-old Massachusetts man who was killed as a result of gas explosions that rocked the Merrimack Valley last September has reached a settlement with Columbia Gas, according to an announcement Tuesday.

  • July 9, 2019

    Perkins Coie Taps Construction Partner For Chicago Office

    Perkins Coie has added a construction attorney who helped establish one of Chicago's most iconic buildings to its roster of partners in its Chicago office, the firm has announced.

  • July 8, 2019

    How The Legal Pipeline Is Failing Black Attorneys

    Despite decades of programming and well-meaning talk about increasing diversity, African Americans still make up a lower percentage of law firm lawyers than both Latinos and Asian Americans. Here's what some attorneys are doing about it.

  • July 8, 2019

    Health Groups Challenge Trump's Power Plant Emissions Rule

    Two public health groups launched the first of what's expected to be many court challenges to the Trump administration's replacement of the Obama administration's Clean Power Plan in the D.C. Circuit on Monday, saying the replacement ignores the consequences of climate change.

  • July 8, 2019

    Trump Talks Green Amid Deregulatory Push

    President Donald Trump on Monday touted his commitment to improving the nation's environment in an apparent attempt to push back against criticism that environmental stewardship is taking a back seat to deregulation, reduced enforcement and increased fossil fuel production during his presidency.

  • July 8, 2019

    Tribes Say Army Corps Reversed Itself On Copper Mine Permit

    Tribes and environmental groups have doubled down on their attempt to block the Army Corps of Engineers from starting construction of a copper mine in Arizona, telling a federal judge that the agency ignored its own findings that the project will destroy key water sources. 

  • July 8, 2019

    Mayer Brown Nabs Arbitration Atty From Squire Patton Boggs

    Mayer Brown has lured a Squire Patton Boggs LLP partner to join its Dubai office and head its dispute resolution practice in the United Arab Emirates, a move the firm says will help to expand its international arbitration capabilities in the Middle East.

Expert Analysis

  • Maximizing Insurance Recovery For Energy Companies

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    Two recent cases from Texas showcase some of the unique insurance challenges faced by the energy industry. Oil and gas companies must carefully craft their insurance programs to account for economic, political and societal pressures, say Robin Cohen and Lauren Varnado of McKool Smith.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Cleary Chief Talent Officer Hy Pomerance

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    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Amanda Brady and Dustin Laws talk with Hy Pomerance, chief talent officer of Cleary.

  • Rebuttal

    Forced Arbitration Is A Far Worse 'Product' Than Jury Trials

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    Jury trials are not dying because arbitration is a “better product,” as alleged in a recent Law360 guest article, but because corporations have rigged the system through forced arbitration to ensure they cannot be held accountable before a judge or jury, say attorneys at Hagens Berman.

  • Guest Feature

    Preet Bharara On The Human Factor In The Justice System

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    A key theme in Preet Bharara's new book is the enormous role the human element plays in the administration of justice. The former U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York discussed this theme, among other topics, in a recent conversation with White and Williams attorney Randy Maniloff.

  • What We Heard At The FTC Hearings: Day 22

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    The 13th hearing in the Federal Trade Commission’s series on competition in the 21st century focused on evaluating the FTC’s merger retrospective program. Jon B. Jacobs and Jeremy Keeney of Perkins Coie discuss some of the recurring themes, innovative concepts and key takeaways.

  • Rebuttal

    Jury Trials, Though In Decline, Are Well Worth Preserving

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    In a recent Law360 guest article, the author applauded the disappearance of jury trials as an inefficient, costly mechanism, but in doing so he overlooked the greater value of jury trials for our justice system, says Stephen Susman, executive director of the Civil Jury Project at NYU School of Law.

  • A Broader View Of The US Supreme Court Bar

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    During the past 15 years, three widely read articles bolstered by starstruck media have promulgated the incorrect perception — sorely in need of revision — that the U.S. Supreme Court bar is limited to a handful of elite lawyers, says Lawrence Ebner of Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • How Treaties Protect Investors When Clean Energy Regs Shift

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    When changes in clean energy regulations lead to investor disputes, domestic companies may be limited to challenging regulatory changes in local courts, but investors from abroad can often seek remedies under international law, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • In Virtual Teams For Mass Torts, The 'Law Team' Is Critical

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    A critical component of any virtual law team assembled for mass tort litigation is a dedicated "law team," which tackles the legal strategy and drafts the many necessary pleadings, motions and other submissions, say attorneys at Pepper Hamilton and Faegre.

  • Opinion

    Jury Trials Are In Decline For Good Reason

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    A recent Law360 article reported on federal judges bemoaning jury trials' nationwide decline, but these laments are unfounded as jury trials have been replaced by better alternatives, says J.B. Heaton of J.B. Heaton Research.

  • The PTAB's New, Narrow Avenue For Filing Late IPR

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    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board's decision in Proppant Express v. Oren provides one example of permissible self-joinder for inter partes review petitioners after the one-year bar. Though limited, the ruling may apply to several other circumstances, say Stephen Zinda and James Hall of Blank Rome.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Circuitous Path To The Law

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    Instead of going to college after high school, I followed in my father’s footsteps and became an electrician. Later I became an electrical engineer, and then an IP attorney. Every twist and turn along the way has made me a better lawyer, says Joseph Maraia of Burns & Levinson.

  • Fee Award Highlights Patent Litigation In Claims Court

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    The recent U.S. Court of Federal Claims decision awarding Hitkansut more than $4 million in attorney fees explains the different fee standard for patent cases against the government, and may lead to increased interest in these types of cases, say Matthew Rizzolo and Steve Meil of Ropes & Gray.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Conrad Reviews 'The Jury Crisis'

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    In "The Jury Crisis," jury consultant and social psychologist Drury Sherrod spotlights the vanishing jury trial, providing a fascinating canary-in-the-coal-mine warning for lawyers, litigants and society at large, says U.S. District Judge Robert Conrad of the Western District of North Carolina.

  • Revamping Your Approach To Client Development

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    As a former general counsel for both public and private companies, my advice to law firm attorneys who want to attract and keep clients is simple — provide certain legal services for free, says Noel Elfant, founder of General Counsel Practice.

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