Illinois

  • March 08, 2021

    7th Circ. Won't Decide If Unions Must Rep Nonmembers

    The Seventh Circuit declined on Monday to weigh in on whether a union should be required to represent public employees who do not contribute to the union, shutting down an Illinois engineering union's suit as premature but noting that it doesn't have a "losing position."

  • March 08, 2021

    Pulling Up Stakes: Weil, Goodwin, Reed Smith

    In our latest roundup of deal makers on the move, Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP welcomed a deals attorney in London, Goodwin Procter LLP added a pair of partners to its private investment funds and private equity practices, and Reed Smith LLP gained a partner for its global corporate group.

  • March 05, 2021

    Judge Says States Ratified Equal Rights Amendment Too Late

    Nevada, Illinois and Virginia ratified the Equal Rights Amendment too late for it to be officially added to the U.S. Constitution, a D.C. federal judge ruled Friday, holding that the states long ago missed deadlines set by Congress for ratifying the amendment.

  • March 05, 2021

    Allstate Seeks First-Of-Its-Kind Shift Of Policies Under Ill. Law

    Allstate has made a bid to divide up more than $5 billion in inactive Michigan auto insurance policies into Illinois-based companies in a first-of-its-kind maneuver under Illinois' Stock Company Division Law.

  • March 05, 2021

    Sens. Revive Push To Ban Sentencing For Acquitted Conduct

    The U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee's top two members introduced a bill Thursday to bar judges from considering acquitted conduct in sentencing, a practice that Justice Clarence Thomas and late Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Antonin Scalia wanted to review as far back as 2014.

  • March 05, 2021

    DePaul Students Say Online Exam Tool Breaks Privacy Law

    A proposed class claims DePaul University is illegally collecting and using students' biometric data through its online exam system in violation of Illinois biometric privacy laws and must be stopped and ordered to pay up.

  • March 05, 2021

    Judge Says Trip Insurance Suit Against United Can't Take Off

    A proposed class action accusing United Airlines of taking kickbacks in online travel insurance sales was grounded by an Illinois federal judge on Friday because the class of travelers couldn't say how the airline deceived them.

  • March 05, 2021

    Chicago Political Operative Denies Bribing City Officials

    A Chicago political operative accused of bribing a former alderman and public school official to obtain benefits for his clients pled not guilty in federal court in Illinois Friday to wire fraud and other charges.

  • March 05, 2021

    Kaplan Saunders' Website Replaced With Viagra Spam

    Kaplan Saunders' website suffered a cybersecurity breach Friday, as the firm's official URL redirected to a website that sells Viagra for part of the afternoon.

  • March 05, 2021

    Firm Denies Extreme Conduct In Impaired Atty's Bias Suit

    Swanson Martin & Bell LLP asked an Illinois federal judge Thursday to trim a former nonequity partner's lawsuit alleging he was fired after developing a degenerative neurological condition, saying he can't show the firm's alleged conduct was extreme or outrageous enough to support his claim of intentional infliction of emotional distress.

  • March 04, 2021

    7th Circ. Decertifies Class In Sex Harassment Suit

    The Seventh Circuit on Thursday reversed a lower court's order certifying a modified class of female correctional workers suing Cook County, Illinois, for sexual harassment, finding the class "cannot stand" because it is too diverse and because the workers have not identified a common question that unites them.

  • March 04, 2021

    Ill. Atty Pleads Not Guilty To Embezzling $31M From Bank

    A Chicago attorney and several former employees and executives of the shuttered Washington Federal Bank for Savings were among 10 defendants who pled not guilty Thursday to charges that they conspired in an elaborate scheme to embezzle tens of millions of dollars from the Chicago bank before it closed.

  • March 04, 2021

    Coronavirus Litigation: The Week In Review

    The nation's top court has ordered a California county to allow indoor church gatherings, a Pittsburgh judge has been sued over an alleged lack of virtual court access and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention can't enforce a nationwide freeze on evictions amid the pandemic.

  • March 04, 2021

    Alleged Charity Robocall Scammers Cut $110M FTC Deal

    Telemarketers behind an alleged massive robocall scheme cut deals totaling $110 million to resolve allegations by the Federal Trade Commission and dozens of states they bombarded 67 million consumers with 1.3 billion deceptive charitable fundraising calls, according to documents filed in Michigan federal court Wednesday.

  • March 04, 2021

    Ill. Judge Says Labor Law Blocks Worker's Finger Privacy Suit

    A southern Illinois federal judge has tossed a biometric privacy suit claiming a kitchen and bath surfaces manufacturer collected and used employees' fingerprint data without informed consent, finding the claims preempted under the Labor Management Relations Act.

  • March 04, 2021

    Real Estate Rumors: CIBC Bank, Ryan, PulteGroup

    CIBC Bank USA has reportedly loaned $15.38 million for a Florida warehouse project, Ryan could get $23 million with the sale of an Illinois office property and PulteGroup is said to be buying 390 residential lots in Florida and has wrapped up part of that purchase.

  • March 04, 2021

    Insurance Co. Employees File FLSA Suit Over OT

    An Illinois insurance company misclassified employees as exempt from overtime even though they did not do executive work, a group of former employees claimed in a proposed class and collective action in federal court.

  • March 03, 2021

    FanDuel Dupes Users With 'False' Betting Info, Suit Says

    An Illinois man has hit FanDuel with a proposed multi-state class action in Illinois federal court on behalf of potentially 6 million FanDuel Sportsbook users spanning 10 states, alleging the sports betting online platform and mobile app misstates how much time is left in games to entice more in-game wagering.

  • March 03, 2021

    7th Circ. Hammers Southwest On FAA Arbitration Exemption

    During a second round of oral arguments Wednesday in a Southwest Airlines Co. employee's wage suit, two Seventh Circuit judges questioned whether the airline was interpreting precedent too narrowly as it argued the dispute was correctly sent to arbitration.

  • March 03, 2021

    Staffing Exec Gets Probation In Immigrant Hiring Plot

    An Illinois staffing company executive has been sentenced to two years of probation after admitting his role in a conspiracy to hire unauthorized immigrants for a Chicago-area sheet metal fabrication company.

  • March 03, 2021

    CFPB Says Payment Processor Aided $71M Elder Fraud

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau accused a Chicago-area payment processing company of knowingly assisting tech support scammers in a scheme that swindled mostly elderly victims out of $71 million over four years.

  • March 03, 2021

    Great Wolf Lodge Says Zurich Owes For COVID-19 Losses

    Resort chain Great Wolf Lodge claims in Illinois state court that Zurich American Insurance Co. wrongfully denied it coverage for business losses its 17 nationwide resorts have sustained during the coronavirus pandemic.

  • March 03, 2021

    Stationery Retailer Paper Source Blames COVID-19 For Ch. 11

    Artisanal stationery retailer Paper Source Inc. filed for Chapter 11 protection in Virginia, blaming the COVID-19 pandemic for a reversal of fortune that stalled its aggressive expansion strategy.

  • March 02, 2021

    Ex-MillerCoors VP's COVID-19 Release Bid Put On Ice

    An Illinois federal judge refused Monday to shorten a former MillerCoors LLC executive's 42-month sentence for stealing more than $8 million from his employer, agreeing with the government he should not be granted compassionate release over COVID-19 concerns because he already contracted the virus and appears to be doing fine.

  • March 02, 2021

    $92M TikTok Privacy Deal Held Up By Objections

    An Illinois federal judge on Tuesday held off on granting preliminary approval of a $92 million settlement in multidistrict litigation accusing TikTok of biometric privacy violations after objectors slammed the recovery amount, the "embarrassingly low" claims rate and the proposed notice plan.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 Ways Outside Counsel Can Impress Their Clients

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    Attorneys can build lasting relationships with corporate clients by thinking of in-house counsel as project partners, adhering to a few basic communication principles and thinking beyond legal advice, says Gerry Caron at Cabot.

  • Circuit Split On Class Feasibility Offers Defense Opportunities

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent opinion in Cherry v. Dometic Corp. adds to the disagreement among federal circuits over the role that administrative feasibility plays in a court's decision on certifying a purported class — but defense counsel may be able to leverage the split by moving cases to favorable forums, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Ethics Tips For Attorneys Telecommuting Across State Lines

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    Attorneys working remotely from jurisdictions in which they are not admitted should take precautionary steps to avoid engaging in unauthorized practice of law, say John Schmidt and Michael Seaman at Phillips Lytle.

  • 6 Ways Legal Employers Can Help Pandemic-Weary Parents

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    Parenting during the pandemic has introduced a series of competing personal and professional obligations for attorneys and professional staff, and even organizations that are supportive of their parent employees can take steps to do better, says Meredith Kahan at Saul Ewing.

  • How Cos. Can Weather Growing DOJ Labor Antitrust Scrutiny

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    In light of of the U.S. Department of Justice's increasing antitrust scrutiny of labor markets and President Joe Biden's vow to eliminate most noncompetes, companies should customize their compliance plans and review employee agreements to mitigate risk, say Eric Grannon and Adam Acosta at White & Case.

  • Questions Loom About DOJ Dismissal Power In FCA Suits

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    The Second Circuit's recent decision to grant a U.S. Department of Justice motion to dismiss a False Claims Act suit, without weighing in on the standard for assessing the agency’s decision, illustrates a significant trend, given an increase in agency dismissals and the expected uptick in FCA cases amid the pandemic, say attorneys at Baker Botts.

  • Republican AGs Likely To Challenge Biden On Multiple Fronts

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    During recent presidential administrations, state attorneys general have challenged federal regulations and obtained nationwide injunctions against executive orders — and there is every reason to believe that Republican attorneys general will continue this trend, resisting Biden administration efforts on climate change, health care, immigration and more, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • 3 Degrees Of Legalization Show True Prevalence Of Cannabis

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    The three degrees of state marijuana legalization regimes throughout the U.S. show that cannabis is only fully illegal in three U.S. states and one territory — not 14 states as some counts indicate — and even in those places, there are stirrings of change, says Julie Werner-Simon at Drexel University's Thomas R. Kline School of Law.

  • Remote Working Tips For Lawyer Trainees And Their Firms

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    The prospect of joining a law firm during the pandemic can cause added pressure, but with a few good practices — and a little help from their firms and supervising attorneys — lawyer trainees can get ahead of the curve while working remotely, say William Morris and Ted Landray at King & Spalding.

  • Mitigate Key FCPA Risks With Tailor-Made Compliance

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    Multinational companies should take a pragmatic approach to Foreign Corrupt Practices Act compliance by being aware of key risk areas — such as inappropriate gift-giving, liability for third-party actions, and countries with recurring corruption issues — and implementing custom-designed procedures that evolve with their operations, says Howard Weissman at Miller Canfield.

  • Compliance Lessons From Newest Fla. Privacy Class Actions

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    To prepare for a new slate of privacy class actions, brought under Florida’s wiretapping statute against retailers using tracking software, companies should be assessing the placement, display and content of their technology disclosures and user agreements, say Ian Ross and Jorge Perez Santiago at Stumphauzer Foslid.

  • What Biden's Ethics Pledge Means For Gov't Revolving Door

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    Attorneys at Nossaman look at how President Joe Biden’s ethics pledge goes beyond those of his predecessors by imposing post-employment shadow lobbying and golden parachute restrictions on his administration’s appointees — and how a House bill proposing expansion of federal ethics law could affect enforcement.

  • Opinion

    Punishing Bar Exam Policies On Menstrual Products Must Go

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    Law graduates across the states are sitting for the grueling two-day bar exam this week despite menstruation-related barriers, such as inadequate menstrual product and bathroom access, which could be eradicated with simple policy tweaks, say law professors Elizabeth Cooper, Margaret Johnson and Marcy Karin.

  • Mitigating BIPA Suit Risk Under Alternative Liability Theories

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    A recent Illinois federal court decision allowing a suit to proceed against Enterprise Leasing and its parent company for violating the state's Biometric Information Privacy Act shows why even companies that don't directly use biometric data must take proactive contractual measures to mitigate alternative liability exposure, says David Oberly at Blank Rome.

  • EPA Hazardous Pharma Waste Rule Has Wide Reach

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    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's soon-to-be-effective rule on hazardous waste pharmaceuticals may seem only relevant to health care entities, but its sweeping definitions could cover any business that dispenses over-the-counter medicines, say Andrew Stewart and Anushka Rahman at Sidley Austin and Renée van de Griend at Ramboll.

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