Illinois

  • November 22, 2017

    Ex-Players' Riddell Helmet Safety Suit Kicked To Illinois

    A California federal judge on Tuesday transferred a putative class action alleging that sports equipment manufacturer Riddell and parent company BRG Sports Inc. lied about the protection that its helmets offered against concussions, agreeing with former college football players who argued that Illinois was the proper venue.

  • November 22, 2017

    Ropes & Gray Taps PE Leader As Chicago Office Head

    Ropes & Gray LLP has chosen Neill Jakobe, a co-leader of its private equity industry group, as the new managing partner for its Chicago office, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • November 22, 2017

    Calif. Ruling Sets Chicago Up For Win In Sanctuary City Fight

    After a California federal judge barred the Trump administration from tying federal funding to compliance with its immigration policies, experts say Chicago seems primed for a win at the Seventh Circuit as it defends its case challenging new conditions on federal public safety funds.

  • November 22, 2017

    Cities And States Brace For Loss Of SALT Deductions

    As the work of reforming the federal tax code took a temporary timeout for Thanksgiving, opponents of legislation that would fully or partly eliminate deductions for state and local taxes didn’t let up in their fight, despite increasingly long odds they would succeed in changing lawmakers' minds when they return from their break.

  • November 22, 2017

    Gov’t Sues Ill. Couple For Evading $1M In Taxes Since 1997

    The U.S. government sued an Illinois couple Tuesday, alleging they failed to pay over $1 million in personal federal income taxes since 1997.

  • November 22, 2017

    Ill. Condo Sellers Say Online Database Overcharged Them

    CondoCerts.com, a web database that sells statutorily mandated certification documents to people selling condos in Illinois, was hit with a $5 million putative class action from sellers who claim it's illegal for the website to charge "more than the reasonable cost of copying those documents."

  • November 22, 2017

    American Securities Sells SeaStar Solutions In $875M Deal

    Dometic Group has agreed to pay $875 million to buy SeaStar Solutions from American Securities LLC, the companies said Wednesday, adding to the Swedish recreational vehicle company's portfolio a provider of vessel control, fuel systems and system integration to the marine industry.

  • November 22, 2017

    EEOC Wins Suit Over Train Co.'s Carpal Tunnel Testing

    An Illinois federal judge has ruled for the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in a suit alleging a maker of train components hid behind false concerns that 38 job applicants might develop carpal tunnel syndrome, saying the company's decision to deny them work was based on unreliable tests.

  • November 21, 2017

    7th Circ. Vacates 'Ponzi' Atty's Sentence, Again Remands

    A Seventh Circuit panel Tuesday vacated a 10-year sentence for a former attorney who pled guilty to wire fraud after the government discovered he had swindled clients for years by stealing settlement proceeds, ruling that the lower court didn’t allow him to address the judge before sentencing.

  • November 21, 2017

    Romance Writer, Amazon Beat Claims That They Stole Plot

    An Illinois federal judge granted romance novelist Donna Fasano and Amazon.com Inc. an early win Tuesday in a copyright infringement suit brought by an author alleging Fasano copied the plot of the book "Reclaim My Heart” from her own unpublished book, "The Promise of a Virgin."

  • November 21, 2017

    Whistleblower Attys Fight Sanctions In Hastert Case

    Illinois attorneys who represented a whistleblower in an unsuccessful suit against former U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert for alleged misuse of government funds are seeking to overturn sanctions imposed on them for pursuing the litigation in the face of what the court deemed case-ending evidence.

  • November 21, 2017

    Chicken Cos. Must Face Broiler Chicken Price-Fixing Suit

    The nation’s largest poultry producers must face most claims in a major antitrust lawsuit brought by three classes of consumers alleging the companies conspired to fix prices of broiler chickens, an Illinois federal judge ruled Monday.

  • November 21, 2017

    Akorn Reaches $24M Deal To End Investors' Accounting Suit

    Specialty drugmaker Akorn Inc. has reached a $24 million deal to settle a proposed investor class action alleging that the company’s failure to fix widespread accounting problems and weak internal controls led it to report inflated revenue figures to the market, according to papers filed in Illinois federal court on Monday.

  • November 21, 2017

    7th Circ. Denies EEOC Rehearing Bid In Autozone Bias Suit

    A split Seventh Circuit rejected Tuesday the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s request for a full court review of a June panel finding that AutoZone did not discriminate against a black employee by transferring him because of his race.

  • November 21, 2017

    2nd Circ. Won't Revive NBA 2K Face Scans Suit

    A Second Circuit panel affirmed Tuesday that NBA 2K players were not injured by the video game’s collection and retention of scans of their faces, but it found the case should have been dismissed without prejudice to give the players the opportunity to renew their state law claims alleging violations of Illinois' privacy law.

  • November 21, 2017

    Debt Collector Gets Initial OK For $600K TCPA Settlement

    An Illinois federal judge on Tuesday signed off on a $600,000 settlement to end a class action accusing a health care debt collector of placing more than 1 million autodialed and prerecorded calls without express consent, saying she “feels comfortable” that the deal’s proposed terms meet preliminary approval requirements.

  • November 21, 2017

    Chicago's Whitehall Hotel Hits Houston Hotel With TM Suit

    Chicago’s historic The Whitehall Hotel says a Houston hotel that opened in 2016 is infringing its trademarks by having both the same name and a confusingly similar logo, according to a complaint filed in Illinois federal court on Monday.

  • November 20, 2017

    Memorabilia Faker Kept Fraud Going After Plea, Gov't Says

    A renowned sports memorabilia dealer who admitted to defrauding collectors and investors as part of a $20 million scheme didn't stop peddling fake items after he agreed to cooperate with the FBI and pled guilty to wire fraud, prosecutors told an Illinois federal judge Monday.

  • November 20, 2017

    Barrett, Nast, Roberts Ask To Lead Dairy Price-Fix Action

    Three attorneys from Barrett Law Group PA, NastLaw LLC and Roberts Law Firm PA asked an Illinois federal court Monday to lead a dairy consumer class action alleging that a now-canceled program to slaughter milk cows led to illegal price fixing in the industry.

  • November 20, 2017

    Collector Can't Dodge IP Suit Over Late Photographer's Work

    An Illinois federal judge on Monday declined to nix a lawsuit brought by the estate of Chicago amateur photographer Vivian Maier, which says a collector infringed on Maier’s copyright when he set up a company based on the display and publication of her photos.

Expert Analysis

  • 6 Months After TC Heartland, Adjusting To A New Landscape

    Nathan Speed

    The U.S. Supreme Court’s May 22, 2017, decision in TC Heartland, which overturned decades of accepted practice on how to evaluate the proper venue for patent litigation, has been lauded by some as ushering in a new era in patent litigation. Others — including some federal judges who have been applying TC Heartland — have found the decision to be much less significant, say Nathan Speed and Stuart Duncan Smith of Wolf Greenfield & Sacks PC.

  • 4 Data-Scraping Lessons From 7th Circ. Ruling

    Benjamin Byer

    Although the Seventh Circuit recently vacated a preliminary injunction that required two competing software companies to allow a third-party data scraper access to their sites and data, the case highlights the complex intersection of big data, copyright, antitrust and the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, says Benjamin Byer of Davis Wright Tremaine LLP.

  • Roundup

    Judging A Book

    Alexander Hamilton and the Development of American Law

    Are the latest books on the judicial system worth reading? Federal judges share their thoughts in this series of book reviews.

  • Don't Waste This Planning Cycle: Year-End Strategies

    Hugh A. Simons

    Law firms are businesses where partners operate with significant autonomy. To see their priorities translate into individual partner action, firm leaders should use a few collaborative strategies, suggests Hugh A. Simons, former senior partner of The Boston Consulting Group and former COO of Ropes & Gray LLP.

  • From Snaps To Tweets: The Craft Of Social Media Discovery

    Matthew Hamilton

    Courts have consistently held that social media accounts are subject to established discovery principles but are reluctant to allow parties to rummage through private social media accounts. Recent case law confirms that narrowly tailored information requests get the best results, say Matthew Hamilton, Donna Fisher and Jessica Bae of Pepper Hamilton LLP.

  • Illinois Biometrics Privacy Suits Bring Insurance Questions

    Jonathan Schwartz

    In the past two years, we witnessed a wave of putative class actions filed under Illinois’ Biometric Information Privacy Act, with the rate of filings increasing exponentially in recent months. Insurers should take note of their potential coverage obligations under various policies, say Jonathan Schwartz and Colin Willmott of Goldberg Segalla LLP.

  • An Interview With Former DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson

    Randy Maniloff

    Jeh Johnson, the former secretary of homeland security, was kind enough to let me visit him to reflect on his diverse career. He told stories that left me speechless. And yes, the man who was responsible for the Transportation Security Administration removed his shoes when going through airport security. You bet I asked, says Randy Maniloff of White and Williams LLP.

  • Hurdles To Consider When Securing A Personnel File

    Michael Errera

    Attorneys should follow seven key points to ensure that their discovery requests and pleadings are appropriately prepared to overcome common hurdles that may be encountered when requesting production of a personnel file, say Michael Errera and Paul Ferland of Foran Glennon Palandech Ponzi & Rudloff PC.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Gilstrap Reviews 'Alexander Hamilton'

    Judge Rodney Gilstrap

    While Alexander Hamilton is the subject of a hit Broadway musical and renewed biographical examinations, professor Kate Brown takes us down a road less traveled in her book "Alexander Hamilton and the Development of American Law" — showing Hamilton as first, last and foremost an American lawyer, says U.S. District Judge Rodney Gilstrap of the Eastern District of Texas.

  • The Case For Creating A Mediation Department At Your Firm

    Dennis Klein

    There are at least four reasons supporting the need for some form of a mediation group within a law firm, especially in firms with larger practices, according to Dennis Klein, owner of Critical Matter Mediation and former litigation partner at Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP.