Illinois

  • May 28, 2020

    Ex-Cafe Worker Must Fix $3.2M Deal In Biometric Data Case

    An Illinois federal judge on Thursday rejected a former cafe employee's proposed $3.2 million settlement she'd hoped would end her proposed class action alleging Corner Bakery Cafe misused its employees' biometric data, ruling that it wrongly limits class members' ability to object to the deal or appeal.

  • May 28, 2020

    Express Scripts Loses Bid To Probe Emails In Antitrust Case

    Express Scripts Inc. may not use an "overbroad" discovery request to dig through years of emails belonging to a consultant for an Illinois city that filed a proposed class action over drugmaker Mallinckrodt's purported scheme to drive up the cost of a hormone treatment, an Illinois federal judge has ruled.

  • May 28, 2020

    Insurer Tells 7th Circ. Coverage Doesn't Apply In Injury Suit

    Columbia Insurance Group Inc. told the Seventh Circuit Thursday that a lower court incorrectly found it had a duty to defend two property companies as additional insureds in a man's lawsuit over injuries he suffered at work.  

  • May 28, 2020

    House Dems Ask FTC To Probe TikTok Over Kids' Privacy Deal

    More than a dozen U.S. House Democrats are pushing the Federal Trade Commission to look into allegations that TikTok blatantly disregarded a deal with the agency that required it to bolster its privacy protections for children, joining a chorus of advocacy groups and other lawmakers who have raised questions about the popular video-sharing app's collection and use of personal data. 

  • May 28, 2020

    Poultry Cos. Say Crisis Response First, Price-Fix Depos Later

    Chicken producers facing allegations of a sweeping price-fixing conspiracy have pushed back on poultry buyers' bid to get some depositions back underway, arguing they can't adequately prepare witnesses while straining to brace a food supply chain rocked by the pandemic.

  • May 28, 2020

    Coronavirus Litigation: The Week In Review

    A BigLaw firm and the NBA face lawsuits over allegedly delinquent rent payments, House Republicans are suing Speaker Nancy Pelosi over proxy voting amid the ongoing pandemic and Enterprise Rent-A-Car employees say the company should have warned them that mass layoffs were on the horizon. 

  • May 28, 2020

    Panel Suggests Suspension After Ill. Atty Wronged 2 Clients

    An Illinois lawyer should be suspended from practice for 30 days after he failed to diligently represent two clients in separate cases and failed to keep one of them informed about his case, a state attorney disciplinary panel said Wednesday.

  • May 28, 2020

    Real Estate Rumors: TikTok, Swezy Family, Amazon

    TikTok has reportedly leased 232,000 square feet in New York, Florida investors Lewis and Elizabeth Swezy have allegedly picked up a development site in the state for $4.05 million and Amazon is reportedly opening up a 43,000-square-foot grocery store in Illinois later this year.

  • May 28, 2020

    Advocacy Orgs Say Clearview AI Broke Biometric Privacy Law

    The American Civil Liberties Union and other advocacy groups hit Clearview AI Inc. with a lawsuit in Illinois state court Thursday claiming the facial recognition technology company has violated the biometric privacy rights of their members, program participants and other Illinois residents on a "staggering scale."

  • May 27, 2020

    Calif. Leads Coalition Challenging Trump Fuel Economy Rule

    A coalition of more than 20 states and local governments led by California challenged the Trump administration's new greenhouse gas and fuel economy standards in the D.C. Circuit on Wednesday, arguing they are an unlawful retreat on a major climate change policy that will make public health worse.

  • May 27, 2020

    3D-Printed Gun Firm Urges 9th Circ. To Revive Blueprint Deal

    An organization that develops blueprints for 3D-printed guns has urged the Ninth Circuit to reinstate a deal with the U.S. Department of State allowing it to publish the firearm schematics online, calling states' challenge to the agreement a move against its First Amendment rights.

  • May 27, 2020

    Marketing Co. Hit With TCPA Suit Over Insurance Cold Calls

    An Illinois resident claimed in federal court Wednesday that a Utah-based marketing company's vendor launched a prerecorded insurance telemarketing campaign by unlawfully cold-calling people who had no relationship with the company "whatsoever."

  • May 27, 2020

    Bose Shakes Wiretap Claims In Headphone Data Privacy Row

    An Illinois federal judge on Wednesday permanently axed wiretapping claims from a proposed class action accusing Bose Corp. of secretly collecting and sharing Bluetooth headphone users' listening histories, finding that the plaintiff's "slightly modified allegations" about Bose "redirecting" music track information to a data miner weren't enough to save the claims. 

  • May 27, 2020

    CFPB Says Chicago Was 'Hotbed' Of Fifth Third Misconduct

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau says its unauthorized accounts lawsuit against Fifth Third Bank NA should remain in Chicago instead of being moved to Ohio because the Windy City has been a "hotbed of unscrupulous conduct" by the bank's employees.

  • May 27, 2020

    Schutt Sports Seeks End To Helmet Patent Infringement Suit

    Schutt Sports has urged a federal judge to end an Illinois company's accusations that the sports equipment maker's F7 football helmet infringes its patent, saying "each and every" element of the claim at issue has been disclosed in earlier patents.

  • May 27, 2020

    Ex-JPMorgan Trader Wants Separate Trial In Spoofing Case

    One of four suspects in a market manipulation scheme run out of the precious metals department at JPMorgan Chase & Co. urged an Illinois federal judge Tuesday to let him have his own trial, arguing that a joint trial with his co-defendants would prejudice the jury against him.

  • May 27, 2020

    Loyola Sued For Tuition Refunds After COVID-19 Closures

    Loyola University Chicago is the latest institution to face a proposed class action seeking to recoup tuition and fees students were charged during the spring semester amid coronavirus-related school closures, as a parent accused the university of withholding refunds despite allegedly receiving more than $10 million in government aid.

  • May 26, 2020

    Drug Cos. Seek To Exit Chicago Opioid Case

    Drug manufacturers including Johnson & Johnson and Teva have told an Illinois federal judge that the city of Chicago's bellwether suit over the opioid crisis should be tossed, because after six years of litigation the city still can't show that any Chicago doctor wrote an inappropriate prescription based on their alleged false statements.

  • May 26, 2020

    Chinese Investors Push Again For Sanctions In Fraud Suit

    Chinese investors told an Illinois federal judge Tuesday that they're worried they won't learn what happened to $45 million they pumped into a failed Chicago real estate project before its owners go bankrupt and creditors line up to collect their money.

  • May 26, 2020

    Transpo Insurer Atlas Beats Stock Suit Over Loss Reserves

    An Illinois federal judge held on Tuesday that shareholders in Atlas Financial Holdings haven't adequately alleged that the commercial transportation insurer knew its loss reserves were underfunded in recent years but withheld that information from investors.

  • May 26, 2020

    7th Circ. Won't Slash Developer's Sentence For Bank Fraud

    A Seventh Circuit panel said Tuesday that a Chicago real estate developer can't use time he spent in jail in Saudi Arabia to mitigate his seven-year sentence for his role in a $22.9 million bank fraud.

  • May 26, 2020

    Health Exec Says She Was Fired For Raising Virus Concerns

    A former executive for an Illinois nursing home has claimed in state court that she was abruptly fired from her job because she challenged the facility's COVID-19 response whenever it was inaccurate or disregarded regulatory guidance for safely navigating the pandemic.

  • May 26, 2020

    Shkreli, Vyera Look To Duck Monopolization Claims

    Martin Shkreli and a company that the incarcerated former pharmaceutical executive founded have urged a New York federal court to toss allegations from state and federal enforcers that they monopolized the market for a drug used to treat potentially fatal parasitic infections.

  • May 26, 2020

    Coronavirus Regulations: A State-By-State Week In Review

    The COVID-19 pandemic found states monitoring scaled-back Memorial Day weekend festivities that went off without a hitch in some places and resulted in crowd-limit violations in others, signaling challenges ahead as the beach season vies with continuing public health safety mandates.

  • May 26, 2020

    United Strikes Deal To End Pilots' Military Leave Class Action

    United Airlines Inc. has reached a deal to resolve a class action accusing it of violating federal law by failing to factor pilots' military leave time into their pension calculations. 

Expert Analysis

  • 7 Considerations For BIPA Class Action Defense

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    Jad Sheikali at Honigman outlines the ever-growing list of issues facing companies defending class actions under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act and how jurisdictional pitfalls and recent developments in preemption may affect defense strategies.

  • Opinion

    Don't Cancel Your Summer Associate Programs

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    While pulling off an effective summer associate program this year will be no easy feat, law firms' investments in their future attorneys should be considered necessary even during this difficult time, says Summer Eberhard at Major Lindsey.

  • 5 Ways To Reduce Post-Pandemic Legal Malpractice Exposure

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    History suggests that legal malpractice claims will rise following the current economic downturn, and while a certain percentage of the claims will be unavoidable, there are prophylactic steps that law firms can take, says John Johnson at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Opinion

    Justices Should Construe Computer Fraud Law Narrowly

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    In U.S. v. Van Buren, the U.S. Supreme Court should follow burglary and trespass cases to limit the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act’s scope to accessing or misusing employer data and avoid the absurd result of criminalizing an employee's unauthorized Facebook visit, say Anthony Volini and Karen Heart at DePaul University.

  • Preparing For A Deluge Of COVID-19 Whistleblower Claims

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    Attorneys at Proskauer break down the kinds of COVID-19 whistleblower retaliation claims employers should anticipate, and explain key steps to minimize risks under the Occupational Safety and Health Act, National Labor Relations Act, Families First Coronavirus Response Act, and state laws.

  • Opinion

    Credibility Concerns About Virtual Arbitration Are Unfounded

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    Concerns that videoconferenced arbitration hearings compromise an arbitrator's ability to reliably resolve credibility contests are based on mistaken perceptions of how many cases actually turn on credibility, what credibility means in the legal world, and how arbitrators make credibility determinations, says Wayne Brazil at JAMS.

  • CCPA Is 1 Of Many Retailer Data Privacy Class Action Worries

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    As class actions targeting the sale of consumer data pose an increasing threat to retailers under the California Consumer Privacy Act and other states’ consumer protection laws, companies must ensure compliance with each statute and assess their vulnerability to deceptive conduct allegations, say Stephanie Sheridan and Meegan Brooks at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • A Lawyer's Guide To Client Service Continuity Planning

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    Ensuring uninterrupted client service and compliance with ethical obligations in a time when attorneys are more likely to fall ill means taking six basic — yet often ignored — steps to build some redundancy and internal communication into legal practice, say attorneys at Axinn.

  • Virtual Meetings Could Be Fertile Ground For Legal Discovery

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    Many remote meeting technologies include recording features as default settings, raising three primary concerns from a legal discovery and data retention perspective, and possibly bringing unintended consequences for companies in future litigation, says Courtney Murphy at Clark Hill.

  • How Courts May Interpret COVID-19 Waivers Of Liability

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    As businesses begin to reopen, they may seek to release themselves from negligence claims for COVID-19 infections through contractual waivers of liability, but whether a waiver is enforceable varies significantly by state, says Jessica Kelly at Sherin and Lodgen.

  • Wis. Executive Power Ruling Has A Downside For Businesses

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    The Wisconsin Supreme Court’s decision last week invalidating the state's stay-at-home order as going beyond the governor's authority could make future executive orders limiting businesses' tort liability during post-pandemic reopening significantly less likely even in other states, says Brian Hauck at Jenner & Block.

  • The Role Of Remote Mediation After The Crisis Is Over

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    When the dark cloud of COVID-19 has passed and resolution centers are once again peopled with warring parties and aspiring peacemakers, remote mediations will likely still be common, but they are not going to be a panacea for all that ails the dispute resolution industry, says Mitch Orpett at Tribler Orpett.

  • How States Are Relaxing Truck Weight Rules During COVID-19

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    Multiple states have adjusted truck weight limits to allow delivery vehicles involved in emergency relief efforts to accommodate more freight during the COVID-19 pandemic, but commercial carriers and vehicle operators must be mindful of differences between states, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • 7 Steps To Romancing The Virtual Classroom

    Excerpt from Lexis Practice Advisor
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    For professors, trainers, lawyers, students and businesses grappling with the unexpected challenges of distance learning, trial attorney and teacher James Wagstaffe offers best practices for real-time online instruction.

  • Key Return-To-Work Considerations For Law Firms

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    There may be precious little notice before the legal community ramps up, so it's important to have return-to-work plans that address the unique challenges law firms will face in bringing employees back to offices, say attorneys Daniel Gerber, Barbara O'Connell and Richard Tucker.

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