Insurance

  • May 7, 2018

    3 Construction Cases To Watch

    In the burgeoning U.S. construction market, companies appear to be more focused on making deals and stacking steel than duking it out in court, but there are still several lawsuits worth paying attention to, attorneys say. Here, Law360 takes a look at three cases attorneys have their eyes on.

  • May 7, 2018

    White House Argues To Rescind Some Health Care Spending

    President Donald Trump intends to send more than $15 billion in spending cuts to Congress this week, the White House said Monday, pulling back on already authorized spending in health care, technology research and other areas.

  • May 7, 2018

    Travelers Needn't Cover Diving Death Suit, 11th Circ. Says

    The Eleventh Circuit on Monday affirmed that Travelers does not have to cover any of a professional dive leader’s costs to defend and settle a wrongful death action filed by the family of a man who drowned on a lobster diving trip, holding an exclusion in the insurer’s policy clearly bars coverage.

  • May 7, 2018

    Deals Rumor Mill: Comcast, AIG, NASCAR

    Comcast alerted the European Union's antitrust watchdog of its bid to buy Sky PLC, Carl Icahn sold his stake in insurance giant AIG, and NASCAR's majority owners are sussing out alternatives for the racing giant.

  • May 7, 2018

    No $49M Sandy Coverage For Chocolatier, 2nd Circ. Hears

    A Chubb Ltd. unit on Friday urged the Second Circuit to reject Madelaine Chocolate Novelties Inc.’s claim for $49 million in coverage for flooding caused by Superstorm Sandy, saying the company can’t use a wind damage deductibles clause to override a flood damage exclusion.

  • May 7, 2018

    Regulator Fines Chubb $1.3M Over NRA-Branded Insurance

    New York's top financial regulator on Monday said that Chubb Ltd. has agreed to pay a $1.3 million fine for underwriting policies for a National Rifle Association-branded insurance program called "Carry Guard" in violation of state law.

  • May 7, 2018

    Insurer Needn't Cover Ride Injury, 11th Circ. Affirms

    The Eleventh Circuit on Monday found that a Zurich Insurance Group AG unit does not owe an event planner coverage over an injury on an amusement ride that the event planner hadn't yet added to its policy.

  • May 7, 2018

    Liberty Unit Won't Cover Contractor In Library Build Dispute

    A Liberty Mutual insurance unit on Monday launched a lawsuit in Texas federal court against a contractor for a municipal library construction project, saying it should not be required to pay up after the construction firm lost an arbitration proceeding over allegedly subpar work.

  • May 7, 2018

    Gibson Dunn Hires Real Estate Finance Pro From Dechert

    Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP announced Friday it has hired a real estate finance partner from Dechert LLP who has represented lenders, including banks and insurance companies, in various phases of loans secured by commercial real estate.

  • May 4, 2018

    Law360 Reveals Titans Of The Plaintiffs Bar

    They’ve gone up against big-name companies while advocating for plaintiffs ranging from grieving family members to shareholders and consumers in some of the biggest and most well-known cases of the past year.

  • May 4, 2018

    Insurer Asks 4th Circ. To Nix $87M Heparin Coverage Ruling

    Travelers Property Casualty Co. and American Capital Ltd. are squaring off in the Fourth Circuit after a lower court ruled the insurer must pay $87 million to defend against tainted blood thinner lawsuits, with Travelers arguing the whole episode was never covered and American Capital seeking bad faith damages.

  • May 4, 2018

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen a commercial fraud claim against asset manager Shire Warwick Lewis, Italian insurers sue a shipper, and Denmark's tax authority take action against ED&F Man Capital Markets and more than five dozen other firms. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • May 4, 2018

    5 Firms To Steer IPOs Exceeding $3.9B, Led By Axa Unit

    Five firms will guide initial public offerings projected to surpass $3.9 billion during the week of May 7, led by Axa Equitable Holdings Inc., the U.S. division of French insurance and asset management firm Axa SA, which could price the biggest U.S. IPO since 2014.

  • May 4, 2018

    Excess Insurer Prevails In Fight Over $2.3M Crash Judgment

    Excess insurer Landmark American Insurance Co. is not liable for any part of a $2.3 million judgment against Deerfield Construction Inc. in a lawsuit alleging the builder's employee caused a crash that injured another driver, an Illinois federal judge ruled Thursday, finding that Deerfield failed to provide prompt notice of the claim to Landmark.

  • May 4, 2018

    Last Insurer Settles With Mylan In $67M Antitrust Appeal

    Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc. and a pair of chemical companies on Thursday settled with a Blue Cross Blue Shield affiliate, coming closer to ending their appeal of a $67 million verdict that found they fixed the price of anti-anxiety medications.

  • May 4, 2018

    Another Ex-State Street VP Charged With Bilking Insurer

    A former vice president for State Street Corp. was arrested Friday and charged in Massachusetts federal court with conspiring with another, already indicted former company executive to secretly pump up commissions, defrauding an insurance company out of $800,000.

  • May 4, 2018

    Insurer's Win In Building Injury Suit Upheld By NY Court

    An insurer is off the hook for charges that it unfairly dragged out its denial of coverage to a general contractor facing a workplace injury suit, after a New York appeals court affirmed that a federal law preempts the state law on which the claims hinged.

  • May 4, 2018

    Citing Climate Initiatives, Allianz To Halt Coal-Only Cover

    Allianz SE will immediately cease selling cover to power plants fired only by coal and coal mines, and plans to withdraw completely from insuring coal-based businesses by 2040, Europe’s largest insurer said Friday, as part of its effort to meet the demands of the Paris climate accord.

  • May 3, 2018

    No Defense Owed To Lawyer In Malpractice Row, Insurer Says

    Allied World Surplus Lines Insurance Co. on Thursday asked an Illinois federal judge to declare it has no duty to defend a lawyer and his firm in an underlying state court suit accusing the lawyer of malpractice over arbitration work he performed for a restaurateur client.

  • May 3, 2018

    Deals Rumor Mill: BP, Vodafone, SoftBank

    BP is mulling a deal to buy some energy assets from BHP Billiton, Vodafone is close to inking a deal to acquire continental European assets from Liberty Global, and SoftBank's talks to buy a stake in reinsurer Swiss Re have reached an impasse.

Expert Analysis

  • Dispelling The Myth Of Insurers' Bad Faith

    Randy Maniloff

    Some policyholder lawyers seem to believe that an insurer commits bad faith if it does anything short of exactly what was demanded, but it is actually very hard to prove. Even when a court determines that an insurer is flat-out wrong, it's unlikely that the insurer will be found to have acted in bad faith, says Randy Maniloff of White and Williams LLP.

  • Rule 23 Changes: Avoid Delays In Class Settlement Approval

    Shandarese Garr

    Among the proposed amendments to Rule 23 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, which are scheduled to take effect Dec. 1, are specific requirements related to “front-loading.” They outline the process for seeking preliminary court approval of class action settlements and related notice plans, say Shandarese Garr and Niki Mendoza of Garden City Group LLC.

  • Refuting Insurer Denials Linked To Employee Misconduct

    Greg Van Houten

    When faced with a denial for coverage of legal costs associated with employee misconduct, policyholders should never assume that their insurer’s interpretation is correct. In fact, some policyholders are well-positioned to refute such denials, especially when the cited exclusion fails to define “abuse” or is otherwise vague, says Greg Van Houten of Haynes and Boone LLP.

  • The Risks Of Attorney Communication With Appraisers

    Brian Devilling

    Attorneys should not attempt to influence a property insurance appraiser's estimate of damages, selection of an umpire or any other substantive issue. While this may run contrary to an attorney's duty of zealous advocacy, it is necessary to avoid subsequent litigation and a potential order vacating an award, says Brian Devilling of Foran Glennon Palandech Ponzi & Rudloff PC.

  • Best Practices For Building A Better Meeting

    Nicholas Cheolas

    How can we improve meetings in the legal industry, which tends to evolve with the speed of a tranquilized water buffalo mired in quicksand? Breaking it down to three phases can yield significant benefits, says Nicholas Cheolas of Zelle LLP.

  • 5 Ways Law Firms Are Becoming More Like Hotels

    Bella Schiro

    One way law firms differentiate themselves from the competition to attract and retain top talent is through their real estate and workplace strategies. Taking a lead from the hospitality industry can help create a more inviting, welcoming and collaborative workspace environment, says Bella Schiro of Jones Lang LaSalle Inc.

  • How Insurers Try To Limit Coverage For Punitive Damages

    Kelby Van Patten

    Insurers treat it as a given that their policies do not cover punitive damages, and insureds often mistakenly accept that premise, but there are circumstances in which punitive damages may be covered, says Kelby Van Patten of Payne & Fears LLP.

  • Opinion

    Gorsuch's 1st Year Shows He Is A Conservative Activist

    Elliot Mincberg

    In his first year on the U.S. Supreme Court, Justice Neil Gorsuch has proven to be a narrow-minded elitist who consistently votes in favor of corporations and the powerful, acting to roll back protections for workers, consumers, LGBTQ individuals and other marginalized communities, says Elliot Mincberg of People for the American Way.

  • Why Texas Contractors Should Watch Lon Smith V. Key

    Brett Wallingford

    Many Texas contractors offer to handle insurance claims for their homeowner customers, but the Texas Supreme Court is currently considering whether to hear an appeal of a case that could deem such actions illegal, rendering their contracts void and unenforceable, says Brett Wallingford of Zelle LLP.

  • Anatomy Of An FLSA Collective Action Conditional Cert.

    Frederick Warren

    A New York federal court recently granted a conditional certification of the Fair Labor Standards Act collective action claims in Julian v. Metropolitan Life Insurance. The case is being litigated hard and well by experienced FLSA counsel on both sides. As such, it is a useful vehicle to analyze cases of this nature and some of the issues that arise, says Frederick Warren of FordHarrison LLP.