We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close

Insurance

  • June 10, 2019

    Sears Owes $20M For Hurricane-Damaged Store, Mall Says

    The management of a Puerto Rican shopping mall has told a New York bankruptcy court that Sears broke its lease when it failed to rebuild a store damaged by Hurricane Maria and owes it $20.8 million in damages.

  • June 10, 2019

    Fla. Cos. Aided $150M Health Insurance Fraud, Suit Says

    Two consumers who say they were duped into buying what they thought was comprehensive medical insurance have filed a proposed class action in Florida federal court against Health Insurance Innovations Inc., claiming it helped run a $150 million scheme to defraud vulnerable purchasers.

  • June 10, 2019

    Insys Hits Ch. 11 After $225M Kickback Settlement

    Facing a bevy of lawsuits and declining sales for its flagship opioid, Insys Therapeutics filed for Chapter 11 protection Monday in Delaware with plans to sell the company in a bankruptcy auction, listing liabilities totaling $262.5 million, days after a $225 million settlement resolved kickback claims.

  • June 7, 2019

    Nurses, Workers Back States In ACA Birth Control Rule Fight

    A broad swath of professional, medical and legal organizations filed briefs Friday urging a Philadelphia federal judge to reject the Trump administration's rules offering wide exceptions to the Affordable Care Act's birth control coverage mandate.

  • June 7, 2019

    House Dems Champion ACA Suit Targeting Trump 'Sabotage'

    The Democratic-controlled U.S. House of Representatives threw its weight behind an ambitious lawsuit Friday that targets the Trump administration's "sabotage" of the Affordable Care Act, asserting that anti-ACA actions have harmed millions of Americans.

  • June 7, 2019

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week has seen administrators for London Capital & Finance sue the trustees of the failed bond firm, the owner of an oil tanker hit dozens of underwriters with insurance claims and a digital banking upstart take on NatWest. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • June 7, 2019

    Accordia Life To Settle Suit Over No-Lapse Policies

    An Illinois federal judge gave an early approval Friday to a settlement, including $2.2 million in attorneys' fees, that ends litigation over claims that Accordia Life and Annuity Co. unlawfully canceled the no-lapse guarantees in several customers’ life insurance policies.

  • June 7, 2019

    Janssen OK With Combining Zytiga Suits If They're Sent To NJ

    Janssen Biotech told a Virginia federal court that it's fine if several proposed classes want to combine their suits accusing the pharmaceutical company of delaying the entry of a generic version of its prostate cancer drug Zytiga, as long as the case gets moved to New Jersey.

  • June 7, 2019

    Battle Not Over In NJ After 'Stranger' Life Policy Ruling

    New Jersey’s highest court made a broad move by effectively banning so-called “stranger-originated” life insurance policies this past week, but attorneys say the state justices left multiple gray areas for both investors and insurers to fight over in the courts for years to come.

  • June 7, 2019

    DC Metro Contractor Wants Quick Win In $2.1M Bond Suit

    A subcontractor on a Washington, D.C., Metro improvement project has urged an Illinois federal court to grant it a quick win on liability and damages under a payment bond claim in its suit alleging a contract bond provider and an insurer owe it $2.1 million.

  • June 7, 2019

    Wells Fargo Reaches $394M Deal To End Auto Insurance MDL

    Borrowers behind multidistrict litigation accusing Wells Fargo and National General Insurance of adding unneeded auto insurance to car loan bills are seeking approval of a settlement that would have the companies pay a combined total of at least $393.5 million.

  • June 7, 2019

    Fla. Justices To Mull Insurer's Ability To Sue Law Firm

    Florida's highest court has agreed to review whether an insurance company can bring a legal malpractice suit against a firm it paid to represent an insured in a separate case, after a lower court ruled the company lacked standing.

  • June 7, 2019

    LabCorp Sued Over Data Breach Affecting 7.7M Patients

    LabCorp dragged its feet when it should have warned patients that an estimated 7.7 million of them had their personal information exposed by hackers, the patients claim in a proposed class action filed just days after the medical testing provider revealed the data breach in a regulatory filing.

  • June 7, 2019

    Swiss Re's UK Life Insurance Unit Gearing Up For IPO

    Swiss Re said its life insurance and pensions-focused subsidiary ReAssure Group is moving forward with an initial public offering, filing a registration statement with U.K. regulators on Friday.

  • June 7, 2019

    Deepwater Horizon Case Could Steer Arbitrator Bias Rules

    A closely watched case pending before the U.K. Supreme Court presents a rare opportunity for the justices to offer guidance to arbitral institutions across the globe on the extent of an arbitrator's obligation to disclose potential conflicts of interest.

  • June 6, 2019

    9th Circ. Judge Rips Trump's 'Broad' Birth Control Exemption

    A Ninth Circuit judge on Thursday criticized the Trump administration’s proposed rules that would exempt employers from providing access to birth control on religious or moral grounds, saying they constitute “a rather broad nullification of what Congress intended” and would let anybody avoid complying with the law.

  • June 6, 2019

    Trade Groups Back Senate Plan To Fight Surprise Medical Bills

    A coalition of industry and business groups has rallied behind a draft Senate bill that lawmakers hope will reduce surprise medical billing, but it raised flags about the risks of including an independent dispute resolution process that could have the opposite effect on lowering costs for patients.

  • June 6, 2019

    Quest Diagnostics Hit With Suit Over 11.9M Client Data Breach

    A Quest Diagnostics Inc. client hit the lab company with a putative class action in New Jersey federal court Thursday over a recently revealed data breach that compromised the Social Security numbers, banking information and medical data of 11.9 million patients.

  • June 6, 2019

    The $69 Billion Questions From The CVS-Aetna Judge

    Across two days and six witnesses, the combative D.C. federal judge reviewing the U.S. Department of Justice deal clearing the CVS-Aetna merger asked many questions — some mundane, some probing — that shed light on what factors he'll consider before ruling on the $69 billion tie-up. Here are some of the highlights.

  • June 6, 2019

    2nd Circ. Won't Revive Pension Fund's Xerox Stock Suit

    The Second Circuit on Thursday refused to revive a proposed class action claiming Xerox and a group of former executives artificially inflated company stock by making misleading statements about a software platform it had developed to help state governments manage their Medicaid programs.

  • June 6, 2019

    NJ Doctor Not Covered For $2.8M Patient Abuse Verdict

    A neurology center operator and an insurer won't need to cover a New Jersey doctor for a $2.8 million verdict over his sexual relationship with a brain injury patient, a New Jersey federal court has ruled.

  • June 6, 2019

    Insys Chairman To Resign In Wake Of $225M Deal With Feds

    Insys Therapeutics Inc. Chairman Steven Meyer will leave the post he’s held since 2017, along with fellow board member Pierre Lapalme, the company said in a regulatory filing Thursday morning, a day after the drugmaker ended an opioid bribe investigation with the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • June 5, 2019

    CVS Gets Aetna's 'Huge Collection Of Customers,' Judge Says

    The D.C. federal judge reviewing the U.S. Department of Justice deal clearing the CVS-Aetna merger on Wednesday expressed doubt about the companies' claim that the tie-up won't give them leverage over rival pharmacy benefit managers.

  • June 5, 2019

    LabCorp Reveals 7.7M Consumers Affected By Data Breach

    An estimated 7.7 million LabCorp customers may have had personal data exposed by a data breach at a third-party billing collections firm, the same firm involved in a huge records breach last week, the medical testing provider said in a regulatory filing.

  • June 5, 2019

    Insys To Pay $225M To End DOJ's Opioid Scheme Probe

    Insys Therapeutics has agreed to a $225 million global settlement to end criminal and civil investigations by the federal government tied to allegations the pharmaceutical company bribed doctors to prescribe a powerful and addictive opioid spray, the U.S. Department of Justice said Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

    Author Photo

    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • Property Insurers: Beware Getting Stuck In Texas State Court

    Author Photo

    Texas federal courts have split over how an election of liability affects property insurers' ability to remove lawsuits from state to federal court. Until the Fifth Circuit weighs in, out-of-state carriers must make timely decisions to avoid being stranded in state court, say Matthew Kolodoski and Harrison Yoss of Thompson Coe.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

    Author Photo

    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • 3 Insurance Issues Raised By The Notre Dame Cathedral Fire

    Author Photo

    The devastating Notre Dame Cathedral fire provides a rare opportunity to consider the many unique factors that owners and insurers must consider when insuring national treasures, say attorneys at Zelle.

  • Don't Let License Rules Snuff Out Your Fire Expert

    Author Photo

    Lawsuits involving property damage due to fire often require the retention of an expert to investigate the fire, but testimony can be excluded if the expert lacks the required licenses. Attorneys at Tucker Ellis break down the different licensing requirements for fire scene inspection in all 50 states.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wood Reviews 'The Making Of A Justice'

    Author Photo

    Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens' new book, "The Making of a Justice," is required reading for anyone interested in 20th and 21st century America, says Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood.

  • 2nd Circ.'s Logical Take On 'Event-Driven' Securities Claims

    Author Photo

    The Second Circuit's recent opinion in Singh v. Cigna will not put an end to "event-driven" securities cases, which revolve around negative operational incidents. But it will likely increase the dismissal rate of such claims, and may deter weaker filings, say Adam Hakki and Agnès Dunogué of Shearman & Sterling.

  • Despite Notice-Prejudice Rule Win, Insureds Should Stay Wary

    Author Photo

    In Providence Health v. Certain Underwriters at Lloyd's London, a Washington federal court applied a notice-prejudice rule to reject the insurer's late notice defense to coverage, but insureds should still pay attention to claims-made-and-reported policies' notice requirements because not all courts may reach the same decision, say Deepthika Appuhamy and Brian Scarbrough of Jenner & Block.

  • State Net

    State Lawmakers Stepping Up Fight Against Insurance Fraud

    Author Photo

    Insurance fraud costs insurers and their policyholders tens of billions of dollars a year. With insurance fraud-related bills introduced in 40 states and enacted in 14 so far this year, state lawmakers seem to agree with the industry that fraud is a major problem, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Getting Out Of Legal Project Management Debt

    Author Photo

    If a client does not demand the application of project management techniques at the start of a matter, or a law firm does not routinely apply them, it is highly likely that additional, avoidable work — legal project management debt — will materialize throughout the matter, says Anthony Widdop of Shearman & Sterling.

  • Fla. Assignment Of Benefits Law Is Good News For Insurers

    Author Photo

    Last month, the Florida Senate passed legislation that will reform the litigious practice of assignment of benefits in first-party property insurance claims. Significantly, the bill's restriction of attorney fees will likely encourage assignees to make more reasonable presuit demands, says Mac Griffin of Holland & Knight.

  • 6 Ways To Keep Your Jury From Zoning Out

    Author Photo

    Science suggests that at least some jurors pay attention to less than 65% of the evidence during a trial due to "task-unrelated thoughts," but there are steps attorneys can take to present information in a more engaging, cognition-friendly fashion, say Dennis Stolle and Dennis Devine of Barnes & Thornburg.

  • Rebuttal

    What HHS Questions About Negotiated-Rate Disclosure Mean

    Author Photo

    A recent Law360 guest article appears to conflate questions the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services asked about potential disclosure of payer-negotiated health care rates with an Affordable Care Act provision, and neglects to reference contemporary data on hospital price growth, says Melinda Hatton of the American Hospital Association.

  • 5 Myths In Legal Crisis Communications

    Author Photo

    Having worked at a boutique law firm, a crisis communications agency and in BigLaw, I have identified a number of common misconceptions across these disparate business models when it comes to crisis and litigation communications, says Robert Gemmill of Hogan Lovells.

  • An Overview Of The Debate Over Litigation Finance Disclosure

    Author Photo

    In light of a New York federal court's recent decision in Benitez v. Lopez, which joins a growing body of case law denying forced disclosure of commercial litigation finance, Stephanie Spangler of Norris McLaughlin and Dai Wai Chin Feman of Parabellum Capital break down the arguments commonly raised for and against disclosure.

Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Insurance archive.