Sports

  • December 12, 2017

    Defense, Gov't Clash Over Money Trail In FIFA Case

    Attorneys for the former South American soccer officials accused of conspiring to accept bribes from sports marketing executives argued Tuesday that prosecutors had shown no proof that any of the funds they showed flowing among various offshore accounts ever actually wound up in their clients' pockets.

  • December 12, 2017

    Expert Urges Contingency Fee Cap In NFL Concussion Deal

    A court-appointed expert brought in to address several questions surrounding attorneys’ fees payouts in the uncapped NFL concussion settlement recommended Monday that the Pennsylvania federal court overseeing the settlement should cap contingency fees for individual attorneys at 15 percent and scrap another request to set aside 5 percent of settlement awards to compensate future work in administering the settlement.

  • December 12, 2017

    Maurice Breakup Fee, Sale Plan Approved In Ch. 11 Case

    Maurice Sporting Goods Inc. received court approval Tuesday in Delaware for its proposed sale and auction plan, as well as a $500,000 breakup fee for its stalking horse bidder that initially drew objections from the U.S. trustee.

  • December 12, 2017

    Mass. Vending Co. Owners Sentenced For Illegal Gaming

    The owners of vending machine company Four Star Vending in North Andover pled guilty and were sentenced for running an illegal gaming and money laundering scheme that netted the largest seizure in the history of Massachusetts' money laundering statute, the state’s attorney general said Tuesday.

  • December 12, 2017

    Gawker, Deadspin Libel Suit Set For Feb. 14 Trial

    A sports gambling guru and a Deadspin.com writer accused of defaming him will go head to head in New York bankruptcy court after a judge set a Feb. 14 trial date to determine whether the journalist is protected by an injunction tied to the sale of the website’s bankrupt former parent Gawker Media.

  • December 12, 2017

    The Top 10 Trademark Rulings Of 2017

    From Cheerios box trade dress to generic “googling” to a blockbuster U.S. Supreme Court decision, 2017 was another bumper year for major rulings in trademark law. Here are the 10 you need to remember.

  • December 12, 2017

    Real Estate Rumors: Kirkland, Jim Crane, Monday Properties

    Kirkland & Ellis has reportedly leased another 120,000 square feet in Manhattan, a company run by Houston Astros owner Jim Crane is said to have landed a $19 million loan for a Florida hotel project, and Monday Properties has reportedly reached a deal to lease more than 16,000 square feet in New York.

  • December 12, 2017

    Apparel Co. Loses Bid To Revive $50M Adidas Contract Row

    A New York federal court on Monday denied a streetwear apparel brand's attempt to revive a $50 million breach of contract claim it brought against Adidas AG over a failed collaboration agreement, finding that the company failed to present new evidence.

  • December 12, 2017

    Madden Games Maker Can't Toss Ex-NFLer's Suit

    A California federal judge on Monday refused to dismiss Electronic Arts Inc. from a retired NFL player's putative class action alleging the game maker improperly used their likenesses in Madden video games, saying a recent Ninth Circuit decision EA based its motion on did not preempt the players’ right of publicity claims under the Copyright Act.

  • December 11, 2017

    FIFA Judge Keeps Soccer Bosses' Disparate Fates From Jury

    The New York federal judge overseeing the ongoing FIFA corruption trial said Monday that it would needlessly confuse the jury to hear that one indicted Brazilian soccer official remains the president of the country's soccer federation, while the other — currently on trial in the case — had been banned from the sport.

  • December 11, 2017

    Has Litigation Finance Shed Its Stigma?

    Once a taboo topic in the halls of BigLaw, litigation finance is winning over converts. And the peer pressure is building for rival law firms to join the bandwagon.

  • December 11, 2017

    Why Investors Are Taking The Leap To 3rd-Party Funding

    They often don’t know exactly what they’re buying, and there’s an ever-present chance they could come up empty in a given case. Here’s why investors are flocking to litigation finance anyway.

  • December 11, 2017

    What Your Colleagues Think Of Litigation Finance

    We asked, and you answered. Here are the results of Law360’s inaugural survey on third-party legal funding.

  • December 11, 2017

    NFL Hall Can Talk To Ticket Holders In Canceled Game Suit

    An Ohio federal judge refused Monday to restrict the Pro Football Hall of Fame's communications with disgruntled ticket holders suing over the last-minute cancellation of the 2016 NFL Hall of Fame Game, finding the museum's attempts to get the proposed class members to accept refunds were not misleading or malicious.

  • December 11, 2017

    Pa. Referees File Class Claims Over Contractor Status

    Two Western Pennsylvania referees filed a federal class action suit Friday accusing the organization that oversees high school sports in the state of improperly categorizing them as independent contractors and shorting them on wages.

  • December 11, 2017

    Forever 21 Supplier Settles Out Of Adidas 3-Stripe Case

    Adidas AG reached a settlement on Friday with one of Forever 21 Inc.’s suppliers in a suit claiming the apparel retailer violated trademark law by using the German giant’s "three-stripe" mark.

  • December 11, 2017

    DHS Settles FOIA Suit Over Irish Olympic Coach

    A California federal court on Monday approved a deal between the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and an investigative journalist suing under the Freedom of Information Act to obtain the details of what allowed a former Irish Olympic swim team coach accused of sexual assault to immigrate to the United States.

  • December 11, 2017

    Detroit Residents Fire Back At Sanctions Bid In Arena Suit

    Michigan residents looking to block $56.5 million in tax dollars from funding the NBA's Detroit Pistons' relocation to a new arena fired back at an "unethical" bid to sanction and compel a deposition that the residents claim has already been agreed upon.

  • December 8, 2017

    The Law Firms Of The 2017 MVPs

    Law360's MVP award goes to attorneys who have distinguished themselves from their peers in litigation, deals and other complex matters. Find the MVPs at your firm here.

  • December 8, 2017

    Law360 MVP Awards Go To Top Attorneys From 78 Firms

    The elite slate of attorneys chosen as Law360’s 2017 MVPs have distinguished themselves from their peers by securing hard-earned successes in high-stakes litigation, complex global matters and record-breaking deals.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: Cross-Border Efforts And Growing Risk

    Patrick Stokes

    The U.S. agencies’ increasing coordination with their foreign partners has led to more potent Foreign Corrupt Practices Act investigations — in terms of both their scope and settlement cost, say Patrick Stokes, former chief of the FCPA Unit at the U.S. Department of Justice, and Zachariah Lloyd of Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Cooke Reviews 'Constance Baker Motley'

    Judge Marcia Cooke

    Gary Ford's new book, "Constance Baker Motley: One Woman’s Fight for Civil Rights and Equal Justice Under Law," is more than a biography of the first African-American woman to become a federal judge. It presents in vivid detail how her work altered the legal landscape of the United States, says U.S. District Judge Marcia Cooke of the Southern District of Florida.

  • Keeping Your Law Library Relevant In The Age Of Google

    Donna Terjesen

    Google’s status as a go-to research tool has transformed legal research habits, leading critics to view law libraries as cost centers. Law firms should embrace Google-style research tools and manage costs efficiently in order to position their libraries as valuable assets for years to come, says Donna Terjesen of HBR Consulting.

  • 6 Things You Need To Know About Millennial Jurors

    Zachary Martin

    Millennials are now the largest living generation and comprise one-third of jurors. While it is impossible to generalize a group so large and diverse, trial lawyers should be mindful of certain generational differences, say baby boomer Lee Hollis and millennial Zachary Martin of Lightfoot Franklin & White LLC.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: A View From The Monitorship Trenches

    Gil Soffer

    There have been many articles on the corporate monitor selection process, but you will find little guidance on how to prepare yourself for a job that has few parallels. There are three key lessons I have learned over the course of a Foreign Corrupt Practices Act monitorship still in progress, says Gil Soffer of Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: The Untold Story Of The Resource Guide

    Charles Duross

    Much has been written about the 2012 "Resource Guide to the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act," but no one has talked about the behind-the-scenes work that produced the guide — until now, say Charles Duross, former chief of the FCPA Unit at the U.S. Department of Justice, and Kara Novaco Brockmeyer, former chief of the FCPA Unit at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: A Journey From Conviction To Dismissal

    Janet Levine

    The twist in the Lindsey Manufacturing Foreign Corrupt Practices Act case was the truncated time in which we prepared. Having refused to waive their rights to a speedy trial, our clients took control of the case — this, along with the compressed time frame, forced the government to make errors, say Janet Levine, Sima Namiri-Kalantari and Megan Weisgerber of Crowell & Moring LLP.

  • Opinion

    Larger Rosters Would Protect NFL Players' Health

    Colin Cloherty

    No one ever seems talk about roster size in the hours and hours of NFL coverage, but a team completing the brutal 16-game schedule with the same 46 players is unimaginable. It’s time to protect players and improve the product for fans. It’s time to expand the NFL roster, says retired NFL tight end Colin Cloherty, now an associate with Wiley Rein LLP.

  • A Look Back At Key 2017 Sports Cases — And What's Ahead

    Helen Maher

    There was no shortage of off-the-field drama in 2017, with athletes deciding they could no longer “stick to sports” and the federal government inserting itself into sports-related controversies. The outcome of four controversies in particular may have implications beyond the world of athletics, say attorneys with Boies Schiller Flexner LLP.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: The Siemens Lesson — Tillerson Is Right

    solmssen.jpg

    Since its whopping $800 million Foreign Corrupt Practices Act settlement in 2008, Siemens cleaned up — and it has “cleaned up” in its long-standing competition with General Electric. How? As Secretary of State Rex Tillerson reportedly told President Donald Trump, you don’t need to pay bribes to succeed in international business, says Peter Y. Solmssen, former general counsel of Siemens.