Sports & Betting

  • July 18, 2019

    Nike Says Kawhi Leonard's Logo Suit Flouts Copyright Office

    Nike Inc. shot back Wednesday at NBA Finals MVP Kawhi Leonard's federal lawsuit seeking to deny the shoe company the copyright to a "Claw" logo that Leonard says he designed based on his notably large hands, alleging the star player is trying to "re-write history" and "defraud" the U.S. Copyright Office.

  • July 18, 2019

    NJ Sports Agency, Atty Duck Suit Over Concealment Claim

    A New Jersey appellate panel on Thursday affirmed the dismissal of a suit accusing the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority and its then-attorney of fraudulently concealing information, which a woman claims gutted her underlying personal injury suit, with the judges saying the agency had no duty to provide that information.

  • July 18, 2019

    Sports Photogs' Claims Against Last Memorabilia Co. Tossed

    A lawsuit launched by a pair of sports photographers against nearly two dozen companies and individuals accused of illegally reprinting and selling their photos has come to an end after a New York federal judge on Thursday dismissed claims against the last remaining defendant for lack of jurisdiction.

  • July 18, 2019

    Sports Betting Case Tests Theory Of Retroactive Damages

    A New Jersey horse racetrack operator is trying to recoup from professional sports leagues some $150 million in revenue it claims to have lost while leading the successful fight to overturn the federal ban on sports betting, a case that experts say could become a model for applying damages on the basis of a change in the law.

  • July 18, 2019

    Investors Slam Camping World's Bid To Toss Stock-Drop Suit

    A putative class of investors urged an Illinois federal court not to toss their suit against Camping World Holdings Inc., saying "operational challenges" and a failure to predict the future by its leadership still meant it misled investors.

  • July 17, 2019

    'May I Just Ask': Era Of Civility Passes With Justice Stevens

    Former clerks and attorneys remember Justice John Paul Stevens, who died Tuesday night at the age of 99, for his trenchant mind and his unending civility. Does his passing mark an end to an era of collegiality on the bench?

  • July 17, 2019

    How Justice Stevens Shaped Sports Law In 4 Cases

    The late Justice John Paul Stevens left a lasting impact on sports law over his 34 years on the U.S. Supreme Court, penning the majority decision in four cases that have fundamentally shaped how the sports industry is regulated today. Here, Law360 looks back on how those cases have affected sports leagues and the athletes that play in them.

  • July 17, 2019

    Justice Stevens' Chevron Legacy Under Attack

    Justice John Paul Stevens' landmark decision in Chevron USA Inc. v. NRDC shaped the course of administrative law, and his legacy, for decades. But a recent wave of criticism shared by members of the current court threatens to erase a doctrine that has long bolstered federal regulators' sway over corporate America.

  • July 17, 2019

    'Kindness, Humility, Wisdom': Justices Remember Stevens

    A day after retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens died at the age of 99, his colleagues paid tribute to the third-longest-serving member of the high court, cherishing his devotion to public service, his kindness and his unwavering commitment to justice.

  • July 17, 2019

    The Stories They Tell About Justice Stevens

    Justice John Paul Stevens had a legendary reputation as one of the most humble and caring members of the court. His clerks related some tales that show why.

  • July 17, 2019

    Pitt Sues Former Sports Marketing Co. For Withholding $3.6M

    The University of Pittsburgh is taking its former sports marketing company to federal court, alleging that IMG College LLC has withheld more than $3.6 million in payments since the school decided earlier this year not to renew its licensing agreement with the company.

  • July 17, 2019

    Hear Justice Stevens In 5 Memorable Moments On The Bench

    Justice John Paul Stevens was known for being collegial and kind, but he also wasn’t one to mince words. Listen to a few of the justice’s most memorable words from the bench, in majority opinions, sharply worded dissents and at oral argument.

  • July 17, 2019

    Justice Stevens' High Court Legacy In 4 Charts

    In this data deep-dive, Law360 examines retired Justice John Paul Stevens’ long tenure, his relatively breezy confirmation, his transformation from a run-of-the-mill Republican appointee to runaway liberal, and the legacy that lives on in his clerks.

  • July 17, 2019

    Ex-NBA Star Dodges Prison For College Ball Bribes

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday declined to sentence former NBA star Chuck Connors Person to prison for accepting bribes while coaching at Auburn University, lauding his long track record of charitable works and rejecting prosecutors' claim that he was motivated by "insatiable greed."

  • July 17, 2019

    US Should Stay On Sidelines In Raiders Row, Oakland Says

    A California federal court should ignore the U.S. government's contention that the city of Oakland should not be allowed to base its antitrust claims contesting the Oakland Raiders' pending relocation to Las Vegas on lost tax revenue, the city said.

  • July 17, 2019

    United Sporting Creditors Want To Stop Ch. 11 Inventory Sales

    The official committee of unsecured creditors in the Chapter 11 case of firearm distributor United Sporting Cos. asked a Delaware judge late Tuesday to enforce an earlier order permitting the committee to run a going concern sale process and limiting the debtor’s liquidation of inventory.

  • July 17, 2019

    Davis Polk-Led Gaming Biz DouYu Racks Up $775M IPO

    Chinese gaming-focused streaming platform DouYu International Holdings hit the U.S. market with a $775 million initial public offering Wednesday, the day after the Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP-led company priced shares at the low end of its range.

  • July 16, 2019

    A Look Back At Justice Stevens' Most Important Opinions

    Justice John Paul Stevens wrote over 1,000 opinions in his 34 years on the U.S. Supreme Court, leaving a footprint in the court’s jurisprudence still visible today. Here, Law360 looks back at his most important decisions, from landmark First Amendment cases to those involving the separation of powers.

  • July 16, 2019

    Justice John Paul Stevens' Brand Of Judicial Humility

    His critics called him a "liberal activist." His fans? A "liberal icon." But those who worked for Justice John Paul Stevens remember a common law judge who took things one case at a time.

  • July 16, 2019

    Retired Justice John Paul Stevens, Hero To Left, Dead At 99

    Retired Justice John Paul Stevens, a World War II veteran who became a liberal icon during his more than three decades on the U.S. Supreme Court, died Tuesday at 99, the Supreme Court said.

  • July 16, 2019

    Pa. Atty Appointed To Oversee Handling Of NFL Fraud Probe

    The Pennsylvania federal judge overseeing the NFL concussion settlement on Monday appointed a Philadelphia-based criminal defense attorney to serve as a new special master to protect the rights of participants in an investigation launched in December into potential fraudulent settlement claims.

  • July 16, 2019

    NC House Approves Cherokee Sports Betting Bill

    The North Carolina House of Representatives on Monday easily passed a bill that would allow the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians to offer betting on sports and horse racing at its two casinos, sending the bill to Gov. Roy Cooper.

  • July 16, 2019

    Ref Can't Sue Radio Station Over Fans' Threats, 6th Circ. Told

    A Kentucky radio station is urging the Sixth Circuit not to revive a suit by an NCAA referee accusing on-air hosts of inciting threats against him for his officiating in a playoff game, saying the broadcasters tried to discourage listeners from going after the ref and that the hosts' speech is protected by the First Amendment.

  • July 16, 2019

    Brooklyn Nets Aim To End Case Over Notorious B.I.G. Jerseys

    The Brooklyn Nets want out of a lawsuit that claims the NBA team violated trademark law by creating a special line of jerseys inspired by the late Brooklyn rapper Notorious B.I.G. and his favorite brand of sweaters.

  • July 16, 2019

    Insurer Off The Hook In Conn. Stadium Bond Fight

    A Connecticut federal judge threw out counterclaims by a construction company in an insurer’s lawsuit seeking repayment for failures related to a baseball stadium building project and others, saying the builder is attempting to hold the insurance company to contract terms that do not exist.

Expert Analysis

  • Remembering Justice Stevens As A Law Firm Leader

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    Rothschild Barry's John Coffey, who joined Justice John Paul Stevens' law firm in 1965, shares what it was like to watch Justice Stevens practice law, mentor younger lawyers and land a malfunctioning plane.

  • Opinion

    IOC Erred In Focus On State-Sponsored Russia Doping Theory

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    The Court of Arbitration for Sport’s reversal last week of the International Olympic Committee's 2017 lifetime Olympic ban of the Russian minister of sport revealed deep flaws in the IOC's process of disciplining individuals for alleged state-sponsored doping by Russian athletes, says Ronald Katz at GCA Law Partners.

  • Answers To Key Legal Finance Ethics Questions

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    While there is discussion in some quarters about new regulations on commercial legal finance, the hands-off approach taken by the majority of courts and legislatures is an implicit recognition that it is already sufficiently regulated, says Danielle Cutrona of Burford Capital.

  • Federal Agencies Need A Uniform Record-Keeping Process

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    The administrative record is very important to federal agency litigation — as showcased in last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision concerning the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census — yet there is no set of consistent principles to guide agencies in compiling these official records, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • The Role Of Dictionaries In Last Term's High Court Decisions

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    Since 32 of the 67 decisions issued by the U.S. Supreme Court during its October term cite dictionaries, it’s worth reviewing the opinions to learn which dictionaries the justices consulted and how they used them, say Bruce Wessel and Brian Weissenberg of Irell & Manella.

  • How To Evaluate The Rise In Legal Employment

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    Although the rate of employment for law school graduates — which had been falling steadily — saw a small increase over the last year, other factors, such as fewer graduates overall and potential future job growth stagnation, temper the good news for those pursuing law degrees, say Tiffane Cochran and Tyler Grimm of AccessLex Institute.

  • EU Adidas TM Case Elucidates 'Acquired Distinctiveness'

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    A recent decision by the General Court of the EU, Adidas AG v. European Union Intellectual Property Office, clarifies that trademark owners may rely on broadly equivalent variants when seeking to prove acquired distinctiveness and illustrates that surveys have a role to play in EU trademark proceedings, say attorneys at Powell Gilbert.

  • Opinion

    The Business Case For Championing Diverse Legal Teams

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    Leveraging the collective strengths of a diverse workforce is not only the right thing to do, it’s a strategic imperative for any successful firm or business, says Louise Pentland, executive vice president and chief business affairs and legal officer of PayPal.

  • Rethinking The Tech-First Approach To Law Firm Solutions

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    When a lawyer complains about some workflow inefficiency they are having, the knee-jerk reaction of many firms is to look for a technology-based workaround. This overlooks the importance of human psychology and behavior, which may be the root of the problem, says Ryan Steadman of Zero.

  • Top 10 Techniques For Crafting A Dazzling Brief

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    Legal writing often falls flat not because it’s unorganized, but because it’s technically unsound and riddled with gaffes that cheapen and degrade it. Avoiding the most common mistakes will keep judges interested and, most importantly, make them trust you, says Daniel Karon of Karon LLC.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Ballard Spahr Diversity Chief Virginia Essandoh

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    In the final installment of this monthly series, legal recruiting expert Carlos Pauling from Major Lindsey & Africa talks with Virginia Essandoh about the trends and challenges she sees as chief diversity officer at Ballard Spahr.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: McMahon On 'Roosevelt For The Defense'

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    In "Theodore Roosevelt for the Defense," authors Dan Abrams and David Fisher meticulously chronicle the forgotten high-profile 1915 libel trial of Teddy Roosevelt, capturing the interesting legal customs of an era before things like notice pleading and pretrial discovery, says Chief U.S. District Judge Colleen McMahon of the Southern District of New York.

  • Prepare For UK's New Approach To Gambling Ads

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    Gambling companies should make sure that any advertising aimed at U.K. users is carefully considered in light of the U.K. Advertising Standards Authority's new guidance and increasingly strict application of rules, says Carlton Daniel of Squire Patton.

  • Tax-Wise, Moving To LA Isn't A Slam Dunk For Kawhi Leonard

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    Kawhi Leonard, who recently helped the Toronto Raptors win their first NBA Championship, is now a free agent considering returning home to play in Los Angeles. Adam Scherer of Crowe Soberman discusses how, contrary to popular belief, Leonard's tax bill won't be substantially lower if he were to play in California.

  • The Fight Over DOJ's New Wire Act Opinion Continues

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    While the New Hampshire Lottery Commission secured an early victory this month in the court battle over the U.S. Department of Justice's drastic November 2018 shift on the Wire Act, the gambling industry remains stranded in limbo, say Christopher Tellner and Katharine Fogarty at Kaufman Dolowich.