We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close

Technology

  • June 12, 2018

    EU Lawmakers Call For End To 'Privacy Shield' Pact By Sept.

    A top European parliamentary committee called on officials to suspend the trans-Atlantic Privacy Shield data transfer pact unless the U.S. is able to fully meet its data protection obligations by September, saying that recent revelations about Facebook's privacy practices exacerbated prior concerns with the deal. 

  • June 12, 2018

    Real Estate Broker Brings Tossed Airbnb Claims To NY Court

    A Manhattan real estate brokerage firm Monday filed a putative class action against Airbnb Inc. in New York state court alleging the home-sharing site illegally and deceptively competes in the city’s rental market, months after a federal court judge tossed a similar suit from the firm.

  • June 12, 2018

    FCC's O'Rielly Says Apps May Justify Telecom Rule Rollback

    Federal Communications Commission member Michael O'Rielly said Tuesday the agency should consider deregulating traditional telecoms to give them a chance to compete with the rise of unregulated messaging apps like Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp or ask lawmakers to give the FCC the power to impose rules on the popular services.

  • June 12, 2018

    Google's AI Rules Show DOD's Commercial Tech Difficulties

    Google CEO Sundar Pichai's recent announcement that the company won't work on weapons programs reinforces the cultural and practical obstacles that remain in the way of the U.S. Department of Defense's efforts to attract commercial technology firms as contractors, despite its efforts at outreach.

  • June 12, 2018

    Facebook Data Pacts Could Spur GDPR-Like Protections

    The recent revelation that Facebook has allowed device makers including Apple, Samsung and Huawei broad access to user data raises fresh questions about the legal and ethical constraints on companies' data usage practices and could prompt a reckoning that would pull the U.S. closer to the tighter controls of the general data protection regulation currently in place in the European Union, attorneys say.

  • June 12, 2018

    Cellspin Denies Shaking Down Nike, Others With IP Suits

    Cellspin Soft Inc. urged a California federal judge Tuesday to reject bids for attorneys’ fees by GoPro, Nike, Fitbit and other companies that beat Cellspin’s lawsuits alleging their fitness trackers and GPS devices infringe its data-uploading patents, arguing it litigated the cases reasonably and saying “there’s no evidence this was a shakedown.”

  • June 12, 2018

    Reg A+ Is Becoming A Popular Path To Pursue ICOs

    More companies are preparing initial coin offerings by using the so-called Reg A+ exemption, a streamlined initial public offering often dubbed a “mini-IPO,” though such campaigns face regulatory hurdles and other obstacles, capital-raising experts said at various talks Tuesday in New York.

  • June 12, 2018

    Feds Say Intent A Non-Issue In South Korean Bribe Case

    Prosecutors are seeking to shut down an appeal by a Korean earthquake researcher convicted of laundering bribes, telling the Ninth Circuit on Monday that the South Korean law he violated does not focus on a bribe-taker's intent in the same way U.S. laws do.

  • June 12, 2018

    GoPro Investors Seek Cert. In Undersupply, Defect Suit

    A proposed class of investors who say they overpaid for shares of GoPro Inc. because the company concealed shortages of its cameras and drones as well as a design defect asked a California federal court Monday for class certification.

  • June 12, 2018

    Antitrust Chief Defends Sticking To Consumer Welfare Focus

    Shortly before a D.C. federal judge cleared AT&T’s $85 billion merger with Time Warner, the U.S. Department of Justice’s top antitrust official on Tuesday said in Washington, D.C., that consumer welfare will continue to be the cornerstone of DOJ antitrust enforcement, rejecting calls to expand the Antitrust Division’s goals to include concerns over democratic market structures or other social benefits.

  • June 12, 2018

    Litigation Support Co. In Hot Water As Belkin IP Trial Starts

    Opening statements kicked off Tuesday in a California federal trial over Kenu Inc.’s claims Belkin infringed a patent for in-car phone holders, but before the proceedings even began, news that Belkin’s litigation support company forged a court officer’s signature prompted the presiding judge to call for criminal fraud charges against the vendor.

  • June 12, 2018

    AT&T Layoff Suit By CWA Nixed By Arbitration Clause

    A federal magistrate judge in Texas has recommended that a lawsuit brought by the Communication Workers of America AFL-CIO against AT&T seeking to halt the layoffs of 713 workers be tossed, citing an arbitration provision in an agreement between the groups.

  • June 12, 2018

    States, Schools Line Up Against PTAB's Immunity Waiver

    States and public universities have urged the Federal Circuit to overturn a decision finding the University of Minnesota exposed its patents to challenge at the U.S. Patent Trial and Appeal Board when it filed infringement lawsuits in district court, a decision the schools said could harm innovation. 

  • June 12, 2018

    FCC Designates New UK 'White Spaces' Database Manager

    The Federal Communications Commission has designated a major domain name registry in the United Kingdom to run a database listing unused broadcast TV spectrum that identifies untapped wireless spectrum capable of transmitting broadband data, saying the company’s technical expertise made it the right candidate for the job.

  • June 12, 2018

    SEC Claims Fla. Couple Defrauded Investors In Shopping App

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has obtained a temporary restraining order and emergency asset freeze to stop an allegedly ongoing investment fraud scheme purportedly carried out by a South Florida couple who claimed to be developing an internet shopping application, the agency announced Monday.

  • June 12, 2018

    Yahoo Hit With £250K Fine Over 2014 Data Breach

    Britain's data protection watchdog said Tuesday that it has fined Yahoo £250,000 ($334,000) for security lapses that were exploited in a 2014 data breach that exposed the personal data of around 500 million account holders worldwide, days after Yahoo's lead European regulator said the internet company flouted EU law in how it handled the episode.

  • June 12, 2018

    Cisco Loses Bid For Immediate Appeal On Antitrust Immunity

    A California federal judge has refused to send the question of whether Cisco should be shielded from Arista's antitrust suit over Ethernet switches to the Ninth Circuit, saying the ruling denying the technology company's bid for Noerr-Pennington immunity didn't merit an immediate appeal.

  • June 12, 2018

    Rosen Law To Lead AMD Investor Suit Over Chip Flaw

    A California federal judge appointed The Rosen Law Firm PA as lead counsel for investors who sued Advanced Micro Devices Inc. when the company’s share price dropped following a revelation that its chips were more vulnerable to a security flaw than had been previously disclosed.

  • June 12, 2018

    PTAB Nixes Microsoft Challenge To Philips IP As Repetitive

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board has declined to review two Philips patents covering content authentication technology, finding the prior art Microsoft relied on in its challenge had already been considered by a patent examiner during prosecution of the patents.

  • June 12, 2018

    Deals Rumor Mill: Abraaj, Sportradar, Xiaomi

    Abraaj is accused of owing a private debt specialist roughly $300 million, KKR and Blackstone landed a spot in a second bidding round for a minority stake in Sportradar AG, and smartphone maker Xiaomi aims to raise $5 billion from mainland Chinese investors.

Expert Analysis

  • Reducing Retirement Saving Barriers For Gig Workers

    Brett Owens

    Workers in the gig economy are currently not entitled to enjoy a traditional employer-based retirement plan because such plans are subject to stringent rules and only permitted to cover employees, not independent contractors. However, Congress is attempting to address this issue via the recently reintroduced Retirement Enhancement and Savings Act, says Brett Owens of Fisher Phillips.

  • Advertiser Self-Regulation And Class Actions: Part 1

    John Villafranco

    When an advertiser voluntarily participates in industry self-regulation before the National Advertising Division, it does so expecting to avoid litigation. Yet there is a consistent concern among advertisers that NAD participation may make consumer class action litigation more, rather than less, likely. Attorneys with Kelley Drye & Warren LLP examine whether NAD decisions actually provide fodder for class actions.

  • Opinion

    Why Won't Judicial Nominees Affirm Brown V. Board Of Ed?

    Franita Tolson

    On May 17, 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court decided Brown v. Board of Education, recognizing a moral and legal truth that should be beyond question in American society. The refusal by some of President Donald Trump's judicial nominees to say whether they believe the case was decided correctly is indicative of the narrow-minded elitism they would bring to the bench, says professor Franita Tolson of the University of Southern California's Gould School of Law.

  • Going Public Without An IPO

    Laura Anthony

    Spotify made a big splash last month by debuting on the New York Stock Exchange without an initial public offering — an often-used going-public method on the OTC Markets that may now gain popularity on national exchanges as well. However, there are some fundamental differences between the direct listing processes for OTC Markets and for an exchange, says Laura Anthony of Legal & Compliance LLC.

  • The Lawyers' Guide To Cloud Computing

    Daniel Garrie

    In deciding whether cloud computing is right for the organization or firm, an attorney must consider cloud computing’s significant impact on the electronic discovery process, say Daniel Garrie, managing partner at Law & Forensics LLC, and David Cass, chief information security officer at IBM Cloud.

  • A Clearer Forecast On Cloud Computing Tax In Illinois

    Samantha Breslow

    Determining whether computer software is taxable is no easy task, especially in light of the changing technological landscape. However, in several nonbinding letters, the Illinois Department of Revenue has recently provided clarification on several key issues, including the taxability of cloud computing, says Samantha Breslow of Horwood Marcus & Berk Chtd.

  • Compliance Lessons From An Arms Export Enforcement Case

    Thomas McVey

    Last month, the U.S. Department of State's Directorate of Defense Trade Controls announced a major enforcement case and settlement for violations of arms export regulations involving FLIR Systems Inc. The case is a reminder to U.S. companies that what may seem like “routine” violations can quickly turn into a $30 million problem, says Thomas McVey of Williams Mullen.

  • Keys To FDA Advisory Panel Prep For Device Makers

    How Device Cos. Should Prep For FDA Advisory Panels

    Receiving U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval is critical for any medical device company looking to bring new products to market. Only a handful of premarket approval applications and de novo reclassifications brave the advisory panel process each year. Gerry Prud’homme and Kristin Zielinski Duggan of Hogan Lovells offer six key points for companies preparing for an advisory panel meeting.

  • Defenses For Using Contractors In A Post-Dynamex World

    Samantha Rollins

    While the revamped test for independent contractor status under the California Supreme Court's recent decision in Dynamex Operations West v. Superior Court raises new questions under state law, it also presents opportunities for companies to present new legal arguments (and take new proactive steps) in defense of independent contractor relationships, say Samantha Rollins and Andrew Murphy of Faegre Baker Daniels LLP.

  • Ending Forced Arbitration In Workplace Discrimination Cases

    Joseph Abboud

    While recent actions to eliminate forced arbitration for employee sexual harassment and sex discrimination claims are welcomed developments in the wake of the #MeToo movement, the concerns motivating the movement provide a similar opportunity to consider the ramifications of changes that benefit one group and how they might be expanded to benefit all workers, says Joseph Abboud of Katz Marshall & Banks LLP.