Ending Forced Arbitration In Workplace Discrimination Cases

By Joseph Abboud (May 15, 2018, 12:12 PM EDT) -- In the wake of the #MeToo movement, lawmakers and employers across the country seeking to avoid public scorn are taking steps that benefit employees who experience sexual harassment in the workplace. For instance, in December 2017, the major U.S. technology company Microsoft announced it will no longer require employees to bring sexual harassment and sex discrimination claims through private, binding arbitration, a process that silences employees and deprives them of their right to be heard in court.

While any employee-friendly actions are welcomed developments, such modest advances raise questions. Why are only victims of sexual harassment allowed their day in court...

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