Energy

  • May 18, 2022

    Naturgy Invests $277M In Its First US Solar Plant

    Spanish utilities company Naturgy announced Monday construction is beginning on a €264 million ($277 million) photovoltaic plant in Texas, the company's first project in the United States.

  • May 18, 2022

    Wis. Court Backs Approval Of $700M Gas Plant

    The Public Service Commission of Wisconsin properly issued a key certificate for a $700 million natural gas plant, a state judge ruled, overriding a challenge from the Sierra Club and Clean Wisconsin.

  • May 18, 2022

    Green Flight Biz Buys Airline, Inks $1.42B SPAC Merger

    Electric-powered aircraft maker Surf Air Mobility and commuter airline Southern Airways will join forces and go public through a merger with a special purpose acquisition company at a $1.42 billion valuation, the trio announced Wednesday.

  • May 17, 2022

    Chevron Asks Justices To Turn Away Suit Over $18B Award

    Chevron is urging the U.S. Supreme Court not to review a decision from the Ninth Circuit that refused to enforce an $18 billion arbitral award issued to the heirs of a Saudi sheikh, arguing that the heirs are misreading the law and trying to mislead the court.

  • May 17, 2022

    DC Circ. Puts Burden On Rail Cos. To Exclude Antitrust Docs

    A D.C. Circuit panel on Tuesday upheld the bulk of a lower court ruling that required some discussions between rail carriers about interline shipping to be included as evidence in a long-running multidistrict litigation accusing the country's four largest railroad companies of a fuel surcharge price-fixing scheme.

  • May 17, 2022

    The Week In Bankruptcy: Purdue Bonus, PR Pension Appeal

    Two dozen states objected to proposed bonus payments for the CEO of bankrupt drugmaker Purdue Pharma, the First Circuit declined to rehear an appeal over changes made to Puerto Rican teacher pensions as part of the island's restructuring, and Affordable Care Act penalties are taxes in bankruptcy court. This is the week in bankruptcy.

  • May 17, 2022

    NNSA Cancels $28B Site Management Deal To Split Work Up

    The National Nuclear Security Administration has canceled a $28 billion contract to run two of its national security sites following related protests, saying it had determined it would be better off splitting the work into two separate deals.

  • May 17, 2022

    Crescent Petroleum Says Iran Oil Co. Still Owes $2.4B Award

    Crescent Petroleum is asking a D.C. federal court to enforce a $2.43 billion arbitral award it won after Iran's state-owned oil company failed to deliver "even a single molecule" of natural gas due under a purchasing contract, saying the award is binding despite ongoing challenges in England.

  • May 17, 2022

    Customers Ask 7th Circ. To Revive Suits Over ComEd Bribery

    Counsel for customers seeking to revive federal racketeering claims against Commonwealth Edison told the Seventh Circuit Tuesday that their allegations that the powerful former Illinois house speaker was a "gatekeeper" deciding what bills passed or didn't pass was enough to survive dismissal, as the utility has already admitted to bribing him.

  • May 17, 2022

    PolyMet Seeks To End Tribe's Suit Over Mine Land Swap

    PolyMet Mining Inc. has urged a Minnesota federal judge to toss the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa's bid to undo a land exchange between the company and the U.S. Forest Service for the NorthMet mining project, saying the tribe hasn't shown any harm from the move and waited too long to bring its suit.

  • May 17, 2022

    Delta, LA Homeowners Spar Over Jet Fuel Dump Class Claims

    Delta Air Lines Inc. and Los Angeles homeowners sparred in California federal court over whether the plaintiffs can pursue classwide damages by claiming a January 2020 jet fuel dump from a commercial airliner left them with contaminated and devalued properties.

  • May 17, 2022

    Finnish Co. Taking Gazprom To Arbitration Over Ruble Ask

    Finland's state-owned energy company, Gasum, announced Tuesday it plans to seek arbitration in its dispute with a Gazprom subsidiary over the Russian natural gas provider's demand last month for payment in rubles rather than euros.

  • May 17, 2022

    EPA Chief Says Budget Boost Crucial For Agency To Keep Up

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's leader on Tuesday told House lawmakers they should approve President Joe Biden's proposed 29% budget increase for the EPA because its staffing levels are stuck at 1980s levels that hinder its ability to do required work.

  • May 17, 2022

    Utilities Say Market Challengers Missed Window In DC Circ.

    Utility companies say clean energy and environmental groups were too late with their challenge to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's de facto approval of a plan to establish a Southeastern regional electricity market and want the case tossed.

  • May 17, 2022

    Pipeline Service Co.'s Ch. 11 Liquidating Plan Gets Confirmed

    Strike LLC, a company that services gas pipelines, received approval Tuesday from a Texas bankruptcy court for its Chapter 11 liquidation plan that will transfer its remaining assets into a creditor trust and wind down its operations.

  • May 17, 2022

    Steptoe Adds 2 Dykema Attys, Including Former Office Leader

    Steptoe & Johnson PLLC announced on Monday that it has hired two former Dykema Gossett PLLC attorneys in Texas, including the former head of Dykema's San Antonio office.

  • May 17, 2022

    4th Circuit Won't Rethink Baltimore Climate Suit Remand

    The Fourth Circuit on Tuesday stood by its decision that Baltimore's suit seeking climate change-related infrastructure damages from fossil fuel companies belongs in state court, rejecting a rehearing bid from Chevron, ExxonMobil and other energy producers.

  • May 17, 2022

    Enviro Groups Sue Over Biofuel Plant Expansion

    Environmental justice and advocacy groups are pushing back against approvals for a biofuel refinery expansion in Los Angeles County, which they say would bake in historic fossil fuel harms that directly affect local minority and low-income communities. 

  • May 17, 2022

    Norton Rose Adds Atty To Expand Enviro Group In DC, LA

    Norton Rose Fulbright has added an attorney with more 20 years of legal experience focused on environmental regulatory law, energy and natural resource transactions and other issues, the firm announced Monday.

  • May 17, 2022

    Pa. Welders Get Bus-Ride OT Suit Sent Back To State Court

    A proposed class of welders working on a Shell petrochemical plant outside Pittsburgh will have their lawsuit seeking pay for time being shuttled between the construction site and off-site parking sent back to Pennsylvania state court, a federal judge ruled Tuesday.

  • May 16, 2022

    Fracking Co. To Settle Investor Fraud Suit For $3.9M

    Liberty Oilfield Services Inc. has reached a $3.9 million deal to settle a suit brought by investors who accused the fracking company of producing false financial statements ahead of a $220 million initial public offering, according to a motion seeking initial approval of the settlement.

  • May 16, 2022

    NRC Can't Duck Texas Nuke Waste Fight, 5th Circ. Told

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission can't evade judicial review of its approval of a West Texas nuclear waste storage project by arguing that all challenges must be funneled through its administrative process, project opponents argued to the Fifth Circuit on Monday.

  • May 16, 2022

    Russian Co. Wins $2.3M Attachment Over Forsaken Oil Cargo

    A subsidiary of the Russian oil company Lukoil won a $2.3 million attachment order against N2 Tankers, a Dutch shipping firm that refused to pick up at least 80,000 metric tons of crude oil from a Russian port city amid the early days of Russia's war against Ukraine.

  • May 16, 2022

    Groups Say Jersey City Turnpike Extension Hurts Climate

    Dozens of environmental, faith and social justice groups claim New Jersey transportation departments are failing to reduce carbon emissions, and want to shut down a planned $4.7 billion turnpike expansion in Jersey City.

  • May 16, 2022

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Elon Musk kept himself in the spotlight with a cold-feet tweet, a Delaware municipality defended its ordinance on the disposal of fetal tissue, and a law firm got taken to task for leaving too many details out of a court filing. In case you missed any of it, here's a wrap-up of the news last week out of Delaware Chancery Court.

Expert Analysis

  • Nev. Case Highlights Settlement Authority Dilemmas For Cos.

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    A Nevada federal court's recent decision in Ceja v. The Vons Companies illustrates the pitfalls of misinterpreting a court order requiring a representative with full settlement authority to be present at negotiations, and is a reminder to consider that courts differ as to what full settlement authority means in practice, says Richard Mason at MasonADR.

  • How FERC Proposal Will Guide Clean Grid Development

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    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's major new proposal on regional electric transmission planning and cost allocation appears likely to substantially reshape how the transmission system is built out to accommodate the clean energy future, say attorneys at Day Pitney.

  • Unpacking OFAC's New Russian Accounting Services Ban

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    New determinations issued by the Office of Foreign Assets Control put a broad swath of accounting, trust and corporate formation, management consulting, legal service providers, and others at heightened risk for strict liability sanctions violations for dealings with Russia, requiring affected entities to update their procedures, say Cari Stinebower and Dainia Jabaji at Winston & Strawn.

  • The Fastest Federal Trial Courts: A Look At Virginia, Florida

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    The Eastern District of Virginia rocket docket and the Northern District of Florida were last year’s fastest civil trial courts in the nation, and interviews with two of their judges reveal they have some of the same practices to keep litigation moving efficiently, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

  • What To Expect From Biden Admin.'s NEPA Updates

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    The Council on Environmental Quality's recent National Environmental Policy Act updates will be critically important to federal agencies seeking to implement the Biden administration's renewable energy policies, but their practical impact may be limited, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Tips For Evaluating Machine Learning For Contracts Review

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    Law firms considering machine learning and natural language processing to aid in contract reviews should keep several best practices in mind when procuring and deploying this nascent technology, starting with identifying their organization's needs and key requirements, says Ned Gannon at eBrevia.

  • Adapting To New Hybrid Energy Project Contracts

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    As growing complexity and risk make contractors reluctant to sign lump-sum turnkey engineering, procurement and construction contracts for big energy projects, parties must give careful thought to how new procurement structures can encourage timely and efficient execution of the work, say Daniel Garton and David Strickland at White & Case.

  • How To Efficiently Deploy Your Professional Growth Strategy

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    Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners discusses how time-strapped legal professionals can efficiently implement a professional growth framework by focusing on only the most effective actions to build the reputation and relationships key to their ideal practice.

  • A 6-Step Framework For Legal Industry Professional Growth

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    Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners discusses how implementing a professional growth framework will help legal professionals gain expertise in a relevant niche to build credibility, focus marketing efforts and build an ideal practice.

  • End Of Clean Air Act Affirmative Defense Could Hurt Cos.

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    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's proposal to remove the affirmative defense provisions from Clean Air Act Title V operating permits could have far-reaching implications for industry — including making companies more vulnerable to citizen suits for unavoidable exceedances of emission limits, say attorneys at Beveridge & Diamond.

  • Why Contempt May Be Apt Punishment For High Court Leaker

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    Contempt of court is an overlooked but potentially effective tool to punish whoever leaked the draft opinion overruling Roe v. Wade and protect the integrity of the U.S. Supreme Court, says Michael Zuckerman at Zuckerman Dispute Resolution.

  • To Meet ESG Goals, Cos. Must Scrutinize Carbon Offsets

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    As regulators and investors demand greater transparency in corporate climate commitments, companies that purchase carbon offsets as part of environmental, social and governance strategies should take steps to evaluate and address the associated economic, reputational and legal risks, say Kevin Feldis and Marcy Hupp at Perkins Coie.

  • Opinion

    Clients' Diversity Mandates For Law Firms Are Necessary

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    Coca-Cola recently scrapped its proposed diversity staffing requirements for outside counsel, and other companies may be reassessing their mandates due to external pressures, but it is important to remember the myriad factors supporting these policies and why they are more important now than ever before, says David Hopkins at Benesch Friedlander.

  • Despite Climate Goals, US Likely To Fill Europe's LNG Needs

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    Although companies and nations have set ambitious goals for reduced greenhouse gas emissions over the next 10-30 years, Europe's move away from reliance on Russian gas in the wake of the war in Ukraine will be a boon for the U.S. liquefied natural gas sector, say attorneys at Womble Bond.

  • Complying With The US Ban On Russian-Affiliated Vessels

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    In light of recently strengthened sanctions against Russia in the maritime sector, all vessel owners, operators and charterers should carefully review affiliations to Russian entities in order avoid being denied entry into U.S. ports, say Jeffrey Orenstein and Luke Reid at K&L Gates.

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