How Due Process Limits Personal Jurisdiction

Law360, New York (April 24, 2017, 6:30 PM EDT) -- A court may only subject a party defendant to its judgments if it has personal jurisdiction over that party under the due process clause of the U.S. Constitution. J. McIntyre Machinery Ltd. v. Nicastro, 564 U.S. 873, 877 (2011).

This requirement means that to be subject to a court’s judgment a defendant must have “minimum contacts” with the state or sovereign “such that the maintenance of the suit does not offend ‘traditional notions of fair play and substantial justice.’” International Shoe Co. v. Washington, 326 U.S.310, 316 (1945) (quoting Milliken v. Meyer, 311 U.S. 457, 463 (1940)).

In recent years the...

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