NCAA Kept Brain Injury Risk Quiet For Decades, Jury Told

By Daniel Siegal (June 13, 2018, 10:54 PM EDT) -- The NCAA has known since the 1930s that football could lead to brain damage, counsel for the widow of a former University of Texas defensive lineman who had chronic traumatic encephalopathy told a Dallas jury during Wednesday opening statements in the first-ever trial concerning the NCAA's alleged responsibility for a football player's CTE.

During the first day of the trial before District Judge Ken Molberg, Eugene Egdorf of Shrader & Associates LLP told the jury his client Debra Hardin-Ploetz's late husband, Greg Ploetz, was never given this crucial information before he made the decision to play college football, even though the NCAA, as...

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