International Trade

  • June 19, 2020

    MPs Float Flexible Trade Deal To Break Brexit Deadlock

    Britain and the European Union could revive stalled trade talks by keeping their regulatory standards aligned after December and until they replace them with a new trade regime, an influential parliamentary committee said Friday.

  • June 18, 2020

    ECJ Supply Decision Could Spell Higher VAT For Polish Co.

    A Polish supplier of animal products could be subject to Hungary's higher value-added tax rate on shipments after Europe's top court decided Thursday that third parties supply goods on a company's behalf when the supplier makes key shipping decisions.

  • June 18, 2020

    Italian Exec Gets 2 Years For Breaking Russia Sanctions

    An Italian business owner at the heart of a conspiracy to export an American-made turbine to Russia has been sentenced to more than two years in federal prison, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday.

  • June 18, 2020

    Senators Target Theft Of Universities' IP From China, Others

    A group of bipartisan senators led by Ohio Republican Rob Portman announced Thursday that it was introducing a bill to prevent China and other foreign governments from stealing intellectual property developed at U.S. colleges and universities.

  • June 18, 2020

    Trade Court Orders Closer Look At Duties On Indian Flanges

    The U.S. Court of International Trade has ordered the U.S. Department of Commerce to explain why it ignored an Indian producer's home market sales when calculating its final tariff, which ultimately drove down its anti-dumping duty.

  • June 18, 2020

    Chinese Co. Charged With Selling Defective Respirator Masks

    A Chinese electronic device manufacturer has been charged with selling 140,400 falsely labeled and defective KN95 respirator masks to a New Jersey company, the U.S. Department of Justice announced, marking the latest charges against purported profiteers exploiting the coronavirus pandemic.

  • June 18, 2020

    EU To Proceed With Digital Tax If US Exit Derails OECD Talks

    The European Union will move forward with a proposal to tax digital giants such as Apple and Facebook if talks to reform the international tax system break down because the U.S. withdraws its support, the European Commission's tax chief said Thursday.

  • June 17, 2020

    State Dept. OKs $862M Canadian Jet Fighter Upgrade Deal

    The U.S. Department of State has approved an estimated $862.3 million deal to upgrade Canada's F-18 Hornet fighter jets, extending their service life while the Canadian government decides on a replacement for its aging fleet.

  • June 17, 2020

    US Withdraws From Global Digital Tax Talks, Officials Say

    The U.S. has pulled away from negotiations at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development to overhaul the global digital tax system, according to top officials at the Treasury Department and the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative.

  • June 17, 2020

    'Team Telecom' Tells FCC To Stop Hong Kong Undersea Cable

    A group of federal agencies known as "Team Telecom" on Wednesday recommended that the Federal Communications Commission block Google and Facebook's proposal seeking an undersea direct connection cable between the U.S. and Hong Kong, citing national security concerns.

  • June 17, 2020

    Lighthizer Says China Likely To Meet Trade Deal Benchmarks

    The Trump administration expects China to increase its purchases of U.S. agricultural products as required by the two countries' January trade deal, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer told lawmakers Wednesday, waving away data that showed Beijing falling behind.

  • June 17, 2020

    Commerce Sets Early Duties On Chinese Lawn Mower Engines

    The U.S. Department of Commerce announced Tuesday that it will move forward with duties on lawn mower engines from China after a preliminary investigation found that the government has unfairly subsidized the imported machinery.

  • June 17, 2020

    EU Floats Options For Curbing Distortion From Foreign Grants

    The European Commission is seeking comments on how to keep distortion from arising in the European Union when governments outside the bloc give subsidies to companies within it, according to a paper released Wednesday.

  • June 17, 2020

    US Hits Syrian Gov't With Sanctions To Force Peace Talks

    The U.S. sanctioned dozens of Syrian officials and companies on Wednesday, including President Bashar al-Assad, in a move intended to force the Syrian government into negotiations to end its long-running civil war.

  • June 17, 2020

    Trump Has No Power To Rescind Fishing Ban, Greens Say

    President Donald Trump illegally claimed power that is reserved for Congress when he rescinded a fishing ban in a New England marine monument that was established by former President Barack Obama, environmental groups said in a lawsuit filed Wednesday.

  • June 17, 2020

    USTR Plans To Hold Mexico's Feet To Fire Under Trade Deal

    U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said Wednesday that the Trump administration will seriously consider new legal challenges against Mexico covering issues like biotechnology approvals and labor rights once a revised North American trade accord takes effect in July.

  • June 16, 2020

    Judge Probing SocGen's Scandal-Linked $2.5B Tax Credit

    Prosecutors in Paris appointed an investigative judge to examine whether France's government illegally gave Société Générale SA a €2.2 billion ($2.5 billion) tax credit in the wake of a historic trading scandal inside the investment bank.

  • June 16, 2020

    CIT Questions Reach Of Trump's Security Tariff Power

    A U.S. Court of International Trade panel raised questions about President Donald Trump's efforts to adjust his national security duties on imported steel Tuesday, pressing the government on the limits of presidential tariff authority.

  • June 16, 2020

    WTO Shoots Down Saudi Arabia's Security Defense In IP Fight

    The World Trade Organization rejected national security-based trade restrictions for the first time ever on Tuesday in a case over Saudi Arabia's failure to prosecute a broadcaster for stealing a Qatari media company's content.

  • June 16, 2020

    Army Corps Asks High Court To Undo Water Permit Ban

    The federal government on Monday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to block a Montana federal judge's order partially banning the use of a nationwide Clean Water Act permit while the government appeals the ruling.

  • June 16, 2020

    Suit Says Turbine Co. Owes $291M For Seized Cuban Port Use

    The original owner of a port seized by Cuba's communist government says a Chinese wind turbine manufacturer and companies it worked with owe $291 million for using its confiscated property to deliver products to the island's largest wind power project.

  • June 16, 2020

    Lender Says US Sanctions No Excuse For Not Repaying Loan

    Cypriot lender Lamesa Investments urged the Court of Appeal on Tuesday to overturn a decision allowing Cynergy Bank to hold back millions of pounds of interest payments on a £30 million ($37.8 million) loan while U.S. sanctions targeting the lender's Russian owner remain in place.

  • June 15, 2020

    High Court Skips Challenge Over Doctrine Of Equivalents

    The U.S. Supreme Court refused Monday to take up a challenge to a Federal Circuit ruling over when patent infringement can be found under the doctrine of equivalents.

  • June 15, 2020

    US Softens Huawei Ban For 5G Cellular Network Development

    The Trump administration announced Monday that companies will be allowed to work with the blacklisted Chinese telecom giant Huawei on the fifth generation of cellular networks, saying the U.S. can't be left out of this development.

  • June 15, 2020

    CIT Approves Solar Panel Cos.' Lowered Dumping Duties

    The U.S. Court of International Trade approved the U.S. Department of Commerce's decision to lower solar panel exporters' dumping duties, ruling Monday that domestic producers had missed their opportunity to challenge the reduced tariff earlier.

Expert Analysis

  • Dismissal Of Amazon Seizure Case May Limit Title III's Reach

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    A Florida federal judge's recent order dismissing allegations that Amazon trafficked in property previously confiscated by the Cuban government in violation of the Helms-Burton Act reiterates a plain-language limitation of the act's Title III, say Pedro Freyre and Lolita Sosa at Akerman.

  • How UK National Security Merger Reviews May Change Soon

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    The U.K. is planning a revamped national security review regime that will present a number of challenges for foreign investors — including U.S.-based private equity sponsors and American operating companies — that seek to purchase or invest in target companies with operations in the U.K., say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • 2 Tested Alternatives To Unavoidable Court Delays

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    Those seeking resolution in commercial disputes that are stuck in an unavoidable but lengthy court backlog due to the pandemic must consider the advantages of arbitration and mediation over court proceedings, says former U.S. District Judge Shira Scheindlin now at Stroock.

  • Opinion

    Minn. Ruling Represents Sensible Stance On Legal Finance

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    The Minnesota Supreme Court's Maslowski v. Prospect Funding Partners decision this week reaffirms that the doctrine of champerty is archaic, impedes important litigation finance activity, and should be abolished in the handful of states where it remains alive, says Andrew Cohen at Burford Capital.

  • Best Practices For A Paperless Law Practice

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    A significant challenge in practicing law remotely is the use and handling of documents without paper, because common digital tools such as email or even secure file transfer applications are problematic, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

  • FERC's New Return On Equity Formulas Are Out Of Sync

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    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's recent orders revising its methods to estimate electric, natural gas and oil utilities' returns on equity lay out significantly different approaches for electric utilities and pipelines, raising questions as to whether such deviations are actually supported by each industry's risks, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Opinion

    Lawyers Must Address Racial Injustice With Radical Candor

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    The legal industry is uniquely positioned, and indeed obligated, to respond to the racial disparities made clear by the recent killings of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, but lawyers must be willing to be uncomfortable, says Tiffani Lee at Holland & Knight.

  • How Lawyers Can Network Better, Virtually And In Person

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    The current decrease in formality and increase in common ground due to the work-from-home environment can make it easier to have a networking conversation, says Megan Burke Roudebush at Keepwith.

  • Practical Tips For Presenting Your Case To Litigation Funders

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    One mistake that attorneys commonly make when presenting a case to a third-party funder is focusing almost exclusively on liability and giving short shrift to the damages analysis — resulting in an aspirational damages estimate that falls apart under scrutiny, say Cindy Ahn and Justin Maleson at Longford Capital and Casey Grabenstein at Saul Ewing.

  • Compliance Tips For Development Bank COVID-19 Projects

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    Companies that bid on projects financed wholly or in part by multilateral development banks to combat the crises caused by the pandemic must have appropriate anti-corruption mechanisms in place to limit the risks of sanctions investigations several years down the road, say Lauren Muldoon and Spencer Bruck at Orrick.

  • Avoiding Inadvertent Privilege Waivers In E-Communications

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    Attorneys at WilmerHale highlight recent developments in privilege law, the significant challenges raised by nontraditional working arrangements popularized during the pandemic, and ways to avoid waiving attorney-client privilege when using electronic communications.

  • How Anti-Terrorism Act Extension Affects Mainstream Cos.

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    Expansion of the Anti-Terrorism Act to include secondary aiding and abetting claims, in conjunction with a stream of pro-plaintiff legislation, is increasing both liability and loss-of-reputation risk for private companies and banks operating in troubled foreign regions, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Where We Are In The US Trade Secret Crackdown On China

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    As the U.S. Department of Justice continues to focus on prosecuting trade secret theft by China, U.S. companies are also filing private civil lawsuits against Chinese companies in federal courts, relying on both the Defend Trade Secrets Act and state trade secret laws, say attorneys at Wiggin and Dana.

  • Opinion

    Keystone XL Ruling Paralyzes Infrastructure Permit Process

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    A Montana federal judge's recent ruling revoking water permits for the Keystone XL pipeline and imposing a nationwide moratorium on dredging and filling operations by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers seriously undermines a tried and true regulatory process, say Tom Magness at Grow America's Infrastructure Now and Patrice Douglas at Spencer Fane.

  • Opinion

    Don't Cancel Your Summer Associate Programs

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    While pulling off an effective summer associate program this year will be no easy feat, law firms' investments in their future attorneys should be considered necessary even during this difficult time, says Summer Eberhard at Major Lindsey.

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