International Trade

  • June 28, 2019

    Sotomayor, Breyer Vie For Chattiest High Court Justice

    On the U.S. Supreme Court's famously "hot" bench, Justice Sonia Sotomayor stood out once again as the most active questioner this term, speaking up more often than any of her colleagues.

  • June 28, 2019

    G-20 Throws Weight Behind WTO's Digital Trade Talks

    The leaders of the G-20 nations on Tuesday gave a firm embrace to the World Trade Organization's effort to modernize the rules of digital trade and e-commerce that would prioritize the free flow of data across international borders.

  • June 28, 2019

    ITC To Probe Barcode Scanners Over Honeywell Patent Claims

    The U.S. International Trade Commission on Thursday agreed to launch a probe into a Japanese company's imported barcode scanners after Honeywell International Inc. said the rival's scanners infringe its patented technology.

  • June 28, 2019

    The Funniest Moments Of The Supreme Court Term

    While general audiences may have a hard time finding the humor, there were several moments of legal levity in the Supreme Court this term that made the justices and the courtroom laugh.

  • June 28, 2019

    Switzerland To Block Swiss Share Trading In EU Markets

    The Swiss government will block European Union exchanges from trading Swiss shares starting on Monday after the two sides failed to finalize a political agreement on bilateral ties, including access to stock markets.

  • June 27, 2019

    The New 'Roberts Court' Finds Its Footing

    Chief Justice John Roberts is presiding over the most conservative Supreme Court in years. But as the 2018 term showed, the reality is more complicated and the new majority is far weaker than expected.

  • June 27, 2019

    Breaking Down The Vote: High Court Term In Review

    A new junior justice. A growing number of dissents. Tough talk on overturning precedent. Unusual lineups in 5-4 rulings. This term left court watchers wondering: “What’s next?”

  • June 27, 2019

    Rubio Patent Suit Ban Bill A 'Catastrophe,' Huawei Says

    It would be a "catastrophe for global innovation" should a measure to block Huawei from defending its intellectual property in U.S. courts succeed, the Chinese tech giant's chief legal officer said Thursday.

  • June 27, 2019

    The Firms That Won Big At The Supreme Court

    Arguing one Supreme Court case is no mean feat, and only a handful of law firms tackled at least three during the latest high court term. Here’s a look at those high-profile battles, and which firms emerged victorious once the dust settled.

  • June 27, 2019

    Removing Huawei Network Parts Could Cost $1B, FCC Told

    Replacing Chinese-made components that are believed to threaten U.S. network security would cost up to $1 billion, representatives for rural wireless carriers and equipment-makers told the Federal Communications Commission on Thursday, urging the government to create a separate funding stream for such an endeavor.

  • June 27, 2019

    US Charges Ex-Venezuela Officials With Laundering Bribes

    The former head of Venezuela's state-controlled electricity company and another ex-company officer were charged Thursday with laundering millions of dollars they allegedly received as bribes in exchange for awarding work to U.S.-based companies, the U.S. Department of Justice announced.

  • June 27, 2019

    Indian Man Charged With Drug Smuggling, Money Laundering

    A Pennsylvania grand jury has indicted a Mumbai, India-based businessman on charges of smuggling drugs into the United States and laundering money, the U.S. attorney's office in Pittsburgh announced Thursday.

  • June 27, 2019

    S. Korean Steelmaker Contests Pipe Tariffs At CIT

    A South Korean steel manufacturer has challenged the U.S. Department of Commerce's tariffs on the company's steel pipes, telling the U.S. Court of International Trade that the department "impermissibly inserted" findings from a separate investigation in its duty calculation for the manufacturer.

  • June 27, 2019

    WTO Faults US For Renewable Energy Tax Incentives

    A World Trade Organization panel on Thursday backed India in its dispute with the U.S. over clean energy policy, finding that subsidies and local content requirements in eight U.S. states run afoul of international trade rules.

  • June 26, 2019

    Venezuela Citgo Appointees Sue Over Board Makeup

    The fight over who runs Venezuela and its vast oil industry landed in Delaware Chancery Court when several people named as Citgo directors by the country's disputed president, Nicolás Maduro, sued to wrest control of the company from another group.

  • June 26, 2019

    Winston & Strawn Nabs Trade Partner From Crowell & Moring

    Winston & Strawn has boosted its white collar regulatory defense and investigations practice in Washington, D.C., with an international trade expert from Crowell & Moring LLP.

  • June 26, 2019

    Seizure Order Allowed Prearbitration, 5th Circ. Says

    The Fifth Circuit has ruled that Louisiana state law allows parties to seize assets while pursuing arbitration for monetary damages, a decision that follows an opinion issued last month by Louisiana's highest court resolving a contentious question on prearbitration attachments.

  • June 26, 2019

    Indian Steel Producer Fights Another Set Of US Tariffs

    An Indian steel company has again sued the federal government in the U.S. Court of International Trade, challenging a 71.09% anti-dumping duty on its corrosion-resistant steel shipments, just months after suing over a 588.43% countervailing duty on the same products.

  • June 26, 2019

    Korean Cos. Challenge Tariffs On Carbon Steel Pipes

    Two South Korean steel companies have challenged the methodology behind the U.S. Department of Commerce’s tariffs on its imported carbon steel welded pipes, telling the U.S. Court of International Trade they want a recalculation because the department “impermissibly relied” on findings from a separate investigation.

  • June 26, 2019

    City Brexit Prep Bill At £4B Amid Warning Against No-Deal

    Financial services companies in Britain have spent £4 billion ($5.1 billion) moving people and assets overseas ahead of Britain's withdrawal from the European Union — and could end up paying out a lot more if the country crashes out without an agreement, a Big Four accounting firm has found.

  • June 25, 2019

    Oxus Won't Look To Revive $1.2B Mining Claim

    Defunct precious metals mining company Oxus Gold PLC will not challenge a decision issued by a Paris appeals court last month affirming a disappointing $13 million arbitral award against Uzbekistan following a dispute over two mining projects.

  • June 25, 2019

    Feds Say Tapes Must Stay In Ecuador Oil Bribery Case

    Federal prosecutors argued Tuesday that recordings of a financial adviser cannot be kept out of his bribery and money laundering case even if they violated a Florida ethics rule, but a judge said he wanted to look at the government's internal discussions approving the secret tapings.

  • June 25, 2019

    Key Dem Won't Take Mexico 'At Its Word' On Labor Reforms

    The chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee’s trade panel warned Tuesday that passing the current version of the renegotiated North American Free Trade Agreement would simply take Mexico “at its word” to implement new labor reforms required by the deals, noting that this strategy has failed the U.S. in the past.

  • June 25, 2019

    TechnipFMC Fined $296M Over Foreign Bribery Schemes

    French oil and gas company TechnipFMC has agreed to pay $296 million in criminal fines to resolve charges that the company engaged in a pair of schemes to bribe officials in Iraq and Brazil.

  • June 25, 2019

    Whirlpool's Door Handles Get Duties, Commerce Says

    Door handles imported from China by Whirlpool Corp. are subject to tariffs on Chinese aluminum extrusions, the U.S. Department of Commerce announced Tuesday, closing the book on the appliance manufacturer's challenge of the duties after it recently dropped its challenge.

Expert Analysis

  • US Cos. With Foreign Affiliates Should Note OFAC Settlement

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    A recent sanctions violation settlement between the U.S. Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control and Stanley Black & Decker and its Chinese subsidiary sets out compliance commitments that U.S. companies with foreign affiliates should use as guidance, say Nevena Simidjiyska and Michelle Rosenberg of Fox Rothschild.

  • Opinion

    How Lawyers Can Help Save The Planet

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    Over a dozen major law firms have joined our effort to overcome the legal obstacles that states, cities and businesses face in fighting climate change. But more lawyers are needed, say Michael Gerrard of Columbia Law School and John Dernbach of Widener University Commonwealth Law School.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

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    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • Opinion

    Oil Cartel Bill's Passage Is Long Overdue

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    The No Oil Producing and Exporting Cartels Act has been reintroduced in Congress, and the oil market conditions that spurred this needed legislation in 2000 are just as widespread today — but so are the inaccurate criticisms of this bill, says attorney Seth Bloom, who drafted the original version of NOPEC.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

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    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • Gov't Contractors Fighting Suspensions Face Uphill Battle

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    The recent dismissal of JBL System Solutions v. Williams in the Eastern District of Virginia highlights the inherent problems in challenging an agency decision and has potentially sweeping implications for government contractors subject to negative responsibility determinations, say Dismas Locaria and Emily Unnasch at Venable.

  • What Fed. Circ. False Ad Ruling Means For Section 337 Claims

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    Though the Federal Circuit's decision in Amarin v. U.S. International Trade Commission mandates careful drafting of Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act-related Section 337 claims under the Tariff Act, it arguably leaves the door open for creative litigants to raise claims for less common "unfair acts," say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Finding Allies In The Fight Against Counterfeits

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    In the world of anti-counterfeiting and brand protection work, collaboration with competitors, customers and online marketplaces can be a smart way to stretch constrained budgets, say Lori Meddings and Li Zhu of Quarles & Brady.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wood Reviews 'The Making Of A Justice'

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    Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens' new book, "The Making of a Justice," is required reading for anyone interested in 20th and 21st century America, says Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood.

  • Foreign Banks Should Remain Wary Of US Sanctions Laws

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    While major enforcement actions against foreign banks for U.S. sanctions violations have slowed down in the past few years, recent settlements against three foreign banks show that federal and state authorities are still enforcing sanctions laws — and the pace of enforcement will likely increase, say Andrew Zimmitti and Richard Hartunian of Manatt.

  • Getting Out Of Legal Project Management Debt

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    If a client does not demand the application of project management techniques at the start of a matter, or a law firm does not routinely apply them, it is highly likely that additional, avoidable work — legal project management debt — will materialize throughout the matter, says Anthony Widdop of Shearman & Sterling.

  • Opinion

    NAFTA Update A Step Backward For US Investors

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    Under the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, U.S. investors would lose the robust international law protections and dispute resolution mechanisms that they have relied on for years in the North American Free Trade Agreement, say Ian Laird and Melissa Morris of Crowell & Moring.

  • 6 Ways To Keep Your Jury From Zoning Out

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    Science suggests that at least some jurors pay attention to less than 65% of the evidence during a trial due to "task-unrelated thoughts," but there are steps attorneys can take to present information in a more engaging, cognition-friendly fashion, say Dennis Stolle and Dennis Devine of Barnes & Thornburg.

  • 5 Myths In Legal Crisis Communications

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    Having worked at a boutique law firm, a crisis communications agency and in BigLaw, I have identified a number of common misconceptions across these disparate business models when it comes to crisis and litigation communications, says Robert Gemmill of Hogan Lovells.

  • An Overview Of The Debate Over Litigation Finance Disclosure

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    In light of a New York federal court's recent decision in Benitez v. Lopez, which joins a growing body of case law denying forced disclosure of commercial litigation finance, Stephanie Spangler of Norris McLaughlin and Dai Wai Chin Feman of Parabellum Capital break down the arguments commonly raised for and against disclosure.

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