International Trade

  • May 20, 2021

    GOP Sens. Rip DOE For Lifting Ban On Chinese Grid Supplies

    Republican senators slammed the Biden administration for revoking a Trump-era order banning certain Chinese electrical equipment from systems serving critical defense facilities, saying the White House wasn't treating potential cybersecurity threats from China as seriously as it should.

  • May 20, 2021

    EU Disputes Pipeline Owner's Claims Over Gas Directive

    The European Union has defended regulations restricting international gas pipelines from being owned by their suppliers, saying the rules serve legitimate public policy objectives even if the owners of the Nord Stream 2 pipeline are inconvenienced by them.

  • May 20, 2021

    Sanders Seeks To Block $735M Arms Sale To Israel

    Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., introduced legislation Thursday to block a pending $735 million arms sale to Israel, saying Congress needs to weigh in on whether the sale will fuel the continuing Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

  • May 20, 2021

    Radio Free Europe Challenges Russia In Human Rights Court

    Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty's Moscow bureau announced it has filed a complaint against Russia in the European Court of Human Rights, accusing the government of violating the European Convention on Human Rights by trying to bankrupt the company with fines and threatening its director with prison.

  • May 20, 2021

    Feds Set Duties On Indian Wind Towers, But Spares Malaysia

    The U.S. Department of Commerce set early phase anti-dumping duties on Indian utility scale wind towers, saying those products were sold at unfair prices in the U.S., but spared Malaysian wind towers from the tariffs requested by domestic producers.

  • May 20, 2021

    EU Site-Of-Origin Rule Applies To Composite Goods, ECJ Says

    A European Union rule for determining the origin of a product composed of parts from several countries is valid, the bloc's top court ruled Thursday in a dispute between an importer of solar energy gear and the U.K. tax authority.

  • May 19, 2021

    Sens. Expand Massive Tech Bill Aimed At China

    Senators have dramatically revamped a sprawling bill with well over $170 billion in funding to fuel technological and economic competition with China, including $52 billion for domestic semiconductor production and $1.5 billion for telecommunications funding along with intellectual property enforcement and boosted antitrust enforcement.

  • May 19, 2021

    PetroSaudi Slams 'Overbroad' Bid For Piece Of $330M Award

    PetroSaudi urged a California federal judge to reject federal prosecutors' proposed warrant to seize funds allegedly tied to the 1MDB scandal, saying Wednesday the "overbroad" warrant would leave the U.S. court "fundamentally and untenably at odds" with a London court.

  • May 19, 2021

    Australia, Canada Reach Deal On Imported Wine Sales

    Corks may be popping at the World Trade Organization this week after Australia and Canada notified the body of a deal to end their three-year-old dispute over restrictions on retail sales of foreign wines in the Great White North.

  • May 19, 2021

    Fla. Wholesaler Owes Duties On Mix Of New And Used Clothes

    The U.S. Court of International Trade has ordered a Florida clothing wholesaler to pay tariffs on a batch of imports, finding apparel subject to duties had been mixed in with duty-free secondhand clothes.

  • May 19, 2021

    GOP Sens. Bash COVID IP Waiver As 'Giveaway' To China

    A group of Republican senators on Wednesday sought more details from the Biden administration on its decision to back a temporary waiver on intellectual property protections related to COVID-19, warning that the waiver won't only cover vaccines and would help China and other countries that "regularly steal American intellectual property."

  • May 19, 2021

    Sens. Look To Bolster China Bill With Trade Enforcement

    As a massive bill aimed at countering China's rise courses through the U.S. Senate, two lawmakers are aiming to beef up the legislation with updates to strengthen the enforcement of the nation's trade remedy laws, Law360 confirmed Wednesday.

  • May 18, 2021

    New Labor Trade Fights May Rest On Diplomacy, Not Legalese

    Two landmark labor cases filed last week will test the strength of a new enforcement tool in the North American trade pact, even if the most likely outcome is a diplomatic resolution that will leave its full legal heft uncertain.

  • May 18, 2021

    Class Wants Clearview Blocked From Foreign Data Sharing

    Illinois residents suing Clearview AI over alleged violations of the Biometric Information Privacy Act on Tuesday urged the judge overseeing their multidistrict litigation to immediately block the facial recognition company from distributing their personal data after learning that it set up offshore companies to provide its software to foreign countries.

  • May 18, 2021

    Trade Court Backs Wheel Duties, But Not Retroactively

    A U.S. Court of International Trade judge validated the scope of a tariff exclusion on trailer wheels from China on Tuesday, affirming that only chrome wheels manufactured using highly toxic chemicals should be spared from the tariffs.

  • May 18, 2021

    Wyden Introduces Bill To Slash Hundreds Of Tariffs

    Senate Finance Committee Chairman Ron Wyden, D-Ore., unveiled new legislation to slash tariffs on hundreds of products Tuesday by reinstating broadly popular trade programs that lapsed at the end of 2020.

  • May 18, 2021

    Pa. Justices Ponder Cost Of Foreign Steel In Public Works

    Pennsylvania's Supreme Court justices wondered Tuesday where to draw the line for judging the final "cost" of a product made with steel, and how to then determine compliance with protectionist rules against selling public entities products that were more than 25% foreign steel.

  • May 18, 2021

    ​​​​​​​Myanmar Hit With More Sanctions In US Bid To Quell Violence

    The U.S. announced new sanctions targeting Myanmar's leadership since the Feb. 1 coup d'etat, formally denouncing the ruling State Administrative Council and 16 individuals including cabinet ministers after another violent weekend fueled by protests and military suppression.

  • May 17, 2021

    US Targets Alleged ISIS Funders In New Sanctions Hit

    The Biden administration said Monday that it will sanction three men in Iraq and Turkey accused of coordinating financial assistance to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria.

  • May 17, 2021

    9th Circ. Says No Class Cert. In '70s Singer's Royalties Battle

    The Ninth Circuit on Monday affirmed a lower court's decision that denied 1970s soul singer Lenny Williams' class certification bid in a suit alleging that thousands of Warner Music artists were underpaid millions of dollars in royalties, finding that the artists are atypical class members who "apparently would not be entitled to damages."

  • May 17, 2021

    Progressives Say Trump Changes Hindered Regulatory Portal

    Several left-leaning groups urged the Biden administration Monday to reverse a Trump-era overhaul of a key website the public uses to keep tabs on federal rulemaking activity, saying the changes diminished agencies' transparency.

  • May 17, 2021

    Full 5th Circ. Asked To Reconsider Navy Crash Suit

    Families of U.S. Navy sailors injured and killed in a crash in Japanese waters asked the full Fifth Circuit to revive their $287 million lawsuit against a Japanese shipping company, saying that though the panel dismissed their case, two judges said the case should be reheard en banc.

  • May 17, 2021

    CIT Again Sends Back Chinese Tire Cos. Dumping Duties

    The U.S. Court of International Trade ordered the Department of Commerce to again reconsider two Chinese off-road tire producers' hefty 105.31% anti-dumping tariffs, saying the department improperly presumed the two companies were under the control of the Chinese government.

  • May 17, 2021

    OneCoin, 'CryptoQueen,' Financier In Default In $4B Fraud Suit

    OneCoin Ltd., the fugitive "CryptoQueen" and a Florida financier have failed to respond to a proposed class action over the alleged $4 billion OneCoin cryptocurrency scam, according to documents filed Monday in New York federal court.

  • May 17, 2021

    US Finalizes Duties On Lawn Mowers From China, Vietnam

    The U.S. Department of Commerce finalized duties Monday stretching as high as 263% on lawn mowers imported from China and Vietnam, backing claims from domestic producers that the goods have benefited from unfair trade practices.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    OFAC Should Issue SDN Payment Licenses that Don't Expire

    Author Photo

    To mitigate unintended financial harm to U.S. companies that have lawful preexisting contracts with newly named specially designated nationals, the Office of Foreign Assets Control should permanently authorize wind-down payments from sanctioned parties, says Alexandre Lamy at Baker McKenzie.

  • Using Cryptocurrency To Evade Sanctions Creates New Risks

    Author Photo

    As sanctioned countries and individuals increasingly use cryptocurrency to circumvent restrictions on their access to mainstream international financial markets, companies providing digital currency services need to step up efforts to identify illegal transactions undertaken using their services, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • Why The Future Law Firm Model Is Industry-Based Offerings

    Author Photo

    Multidisciplinary, industry-based groups at law firms allow for more holistic legal advice, lead to sustainable client relationships, and are likely to replace practice group monoliths at many firms, say Jennifer Simpson Carr at Furia Rubel, Timothy Corcoran at Corcoran Consulting and Mike Mellor at Pryor Cashman.

  • Cargo Insurance May Cover Losses From Suez Canal Delays

    Author Photo

    Policyholders who have suffered economic losses from the recent Suez Canal blockage may be able to secure compensation from their standard cargo insurance policies, even if coverage for delays is explicitly precluded, says Jeremy Lawrence at Munger Tolles.

  • Thought Leadership's Critical Role In Law Firm Diversity

    Author Photo

    Minority attorneys are often underrepresented in conferences, media interviews and other law firm thought leadership campaigns, which affects their visibility with potential clients and their ability to advance at their firms, says John Hellerman at Hellerman Communications.

  • What Associates Should Consider Before Switching Practices

    Author Photo

    The current high demand for midlevel associates provides them a rare opportunity to potentially explore new practice areas, but associates should first ask themselves six questions to begin figuring out why a change sounds appealing, says Stephanie Biderman at Major Lindsey.

  • 4 Effective Ways To Prioritize Client Advocacy

    Author Photo

    To truly support a client going through a complicated lawsuit or a painful experience, lawyers must think beyond interpreting legal guidelines and navigating court proceedings, says attorney Scott Corwin.

  • FDA Letters Suggest Scrutiny Of Virus And Vaping Products

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration stepped up its issuance of warning letters during the first quarter of 2021, and focused particularly on products for diagnosing, treating and preventing COVID-19, and on vaping products — so manufacturers and retailers in these sectors should intensify their marketing compliance efforts, says Katie Insogna at DLA Piper.

  • A Call For Greater Clarity Around SEC Cooperation Credit

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s decision not to fine Gulfport Energy in a recent enforcement action over disclosure failures highlights the need for SEC guidance on the benefits a company will receive for cooperating with agency investigations, say Robert Cohen and Brook Jackling at Davis Polk.

  • Remote Law Firm Culture Should Prioritize Associate Training

    Author Photo

    Due to the pandemic, the gap between law school and the first day on the job has never been wider, but law firms can leverage training to bridge that intimidating gap and convey the unique value of their culture in a virtual environment, say Melissa Schwind at Ward and Smith, and William Kenney and Jaron Luttich at Element Standard.

  • Virtual Litigation May Unravel The Narcissistic Lawyer

    Author Photo

    The virtual courtroom limits a narcissistic lawyer's ability to intimidate witnesses and opposing counsel, boast to clients or engage in grandstanding — an unexpected benefit of the global pandemic as some aspects of remote litigation are likely here to stay, says Jennifer Gibbs at Zelle.

  • Protecting Construction Projects From China Sanctions Risks

    Author Photo

    Parties to international construction projects involving Chinese and non-Chinese participants should look to key contract provisions for relief if one party becomes adversely affected by U.S. sanctions against China, say William Godwin and Anton Ware at Arnold & Porter.

  • ABA Remote Work Guide Raises Bar For Atty Tech Know-How

    Author Photo

    A recent American Bar Association opinion on lawyers' ethical duties of competence and confidentiality when working remotely should be viewed as part of a larger movement by which attorneys are being exhorted to develop competence in 21st century technology, say Jennifer Goldsmith at Ironshore and Barry Temkin at Mound Cotton.

  • Lateral Hire Conflict Screening Lessons From DLA Piper Case

    Author Photo

    While a Texas federal court recently denied a motion to disqualify DLA Piper from representing Apple in a patent dispute after the law firm hired an attorney who formerly represented opponent Maxwell, the case is a reminder that robust conflict checks during lateral hiring can save firms the time and expense of defending disqualification motions, says Hope Comisky at Griesing Law.

  • How USMCA Empowers Investors Against Mexico Power Law

    Author Photo

    U.S. and Canadian investors in Mexico's energy sector pursuing legal remedies against the country's newly amended Electricity Industry Law, which introduces preferences for the Mexican state-owned utility, should consider the ways they can seek relief under the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the International Trade archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!