International Trade

  • June 20, 2019

    Atty, Retired Army Col. Guilty In $84M Haiti Bribery Scheme

    A federal jury in Boston found an attorney and a retired U.S. Army colonel guilty on Thursday of making a plan to bribe government officials in Haiti in exchange for approvals on an $84 million port project.

  • June 20, 2019

    Walmart To Pay $282M To End Government's FCPA Claims

    Walmart Inc. agreed Thursday to pay more than $282 million to settle allegations by U.S. authorities that it violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act by failing to ensure subsidiaries in Brazil, China, India and Mexico had adequate anti-corruption programs.

  • June 19, 2019

    Microsoft, Tech Giants Oppose Trump Tablet, Laptop Tariffs

    Microsoft Corp., Dell Technologies, HP Inc. and Intel Corp. joined forces Wednesday to oppose the Trump administration's proposal to include tablets and laptop computers in its list of Chinese goods targeted for tariffs.

  • June 19, 2019

    USTR Up To Restart Talks With China As Tariff Threat Looms

    U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said on Wednesday that the U.S. would be willing to restart negotiations with China, as President Donald Trump prepares to meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the upcoming G-20 Summit.

  • June 19, 2019

    Huawei Judge Will Hear Sidley Atty DQ Bid In Fall

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday set a September date to hear arguments over whether to disqualify a former U.S. deputy attorney general turned Sidley Austin LLP partner from representing Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. in its fight against charges including bank fraud and sanctions violations.

  • June 19, 2019

    USTR Says Mexico's NAFTA 2.0 Labor Rules Can Be Enforced

    U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer assured lawmakers Wednesday morning that Mexico would honor its newly passed labor laws as required by the renegotiated North American Free Trade Agreement, as House Democrats pressed the trade ambassador on how this new version of the trilateral deal would be enforced.

  • June 19, 2019

    Conspiracy To Bribe Haitian Officials Was Explicit, Jury Hears

    Recorded conversations involving two men who were pursuing an $84 million port project in Haiti offer clear evidence that they intended to bribe government officials in exchange for approvals, a prosecutor told jurors in Massachusetts federal court Wednesday as a seven-day trial concluded.

  • June 19, 2019

    Cuban Hotel Owners Sue Trivago Over Confiscated Property

    The heirs of the owner of a Cuban hotel filed a proposed class suit Tuesday against Expedia Inc. subsidiary Trivago GmbH, claiming the online booking company has unlawfully profited from their property, which was confiscated by Fidel Castro's government after the Cuban Revolution.

  • June 19, 2019

    Starks To Hold Forum On Huawei Replacement Next Week

    Amid growing concern that foreign-made broadband equipment poses a security risk to American telecommunications networks, FCC Commissioner Geoffrey Starks on Wednesday said he will host a forum next week examining how to weed out and replace existing components that might be compromised.

  • June 19, 2019

    MoFo Launches Latin America Desk With New Miami Office

    Morrison & Foerster LLP launched a new Latin America desk Wednesday to build out its capabilities in the region, as it officially opened its Miami office with nine Latin America-focused transactional attorneys from Greenberg Traurig LLP.

  • June 19, 2019

    PTAB Says ITC Case Doesn't Bar Dental Patent Challenge

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board on Tuesday agreed to review an Align Technology Inc. patent covering a teeth imaging device after it was challenged by a Danish rival, rejecting Align’s argument that the rival got an unfair leg up because the companies have already faced off in a related case at the U.S. International Trade Commission.

  • June 18, 2019

    Menendez Spars With USTR Over Trump's Mexico Tariff Threat

    Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer clashed on Tuesday over the Trump administration's now-abandoned threat to set tariffs on Mexico to stem the flow of immigrants into the U.S., with the lawmaker questioning the use of duties to address nontrade issues.

  • June 18, 2019

    Suspect Says US Can’t Charge Him With $2B Fraud In Africa

    A Lebanese salesman told a New York federal judge that the U.S. government has yet to show how it is related with $2 billion in allegedly fraudulent loans backed by the government of Mozambique.

  • June 18, 2019

    Rubio Targets Huawei Patent Suits Through Defense Bill

    Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., has filed a measure to block companies on certain U.S. national security watch lists, including Huawei, from bringing patent litigation in the U.S. court system, days after Huawei signaled it wants Verizon to pay for hundreds of technology licenses.

  • June 18, 2019

    Lighthizer Defends Trump's Aggressive China Strategy

    A number of U.S. senators criticized the Trump administration's escalating tariff campaign against China on Tuesday, but U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said the moves were necessary to counter the serious problems posed by Beijing's intellectual property and technology transfer rules.

  • June 18, 2019

    Trump Confirms Trade Meeting With Xi On G-20 Sidelines

    President Donald Trump on Tuesday confirmed he will hold a meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping at this month's Group of 20 leading rich and developing nations summit to discuss the two countries' fractious trade relationship.

  • June 18, 2019

    USTR Pledges Close Work With Congress To Pass NAFTA 2.0

    U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said Tuesday that he will work with congressional Democrats to allay their fears about the revised North American Free Trade Agreement, vowing to tackle criticisms of the accord's labor, environmental and drug-pricing rules to get it ratified.

  • June 18, 2019

    Even With Green Light, Cuban Property Recovery Isn't Easy

    Multinational hospitality companies are squarely in the litigation crosshairs now that the Trump administration has allowed litigation over property seized by Fidel Castro's government, but attorneys say the tangled international nature of these suits will be costly to prosecute and any judgments will be more difficult to enforce than it may seem.

  • June 18, 2019

    UK Gov't Settles £1.25B Iranian Bank Claim Over Sanctions

    The U.K. government has settled a £1.25 billion ($1.6 billion) lawsuit brought against it by Bank Mellat over damages related to its enforcement of nuclear sanctions, which were later struck down, lawyers for the Iranian bank told a London court Tuesday.

  • June 17, 2019

    Spanish Hotel Co. Meliá Hit With Suit Over Cuban Properties

    A Cuban-American family has opened up a new front for litigation over Cuban properties confiscated by Fidel Castro's government with a €10 million ($11.2 million) lawsuit that uses Spanish civil law against Meliá Hotels International over two of its properties that the family says are on land where they once had a sugar mill.

  • June 17, 2019

    Investment Biz Partners' Fraud Suit Spirals Into 'Food Fight'

    A New York state judge on Monday decried how a fraud lawsuit between onetime infrastructure investment partners and law school friends devolved into a “food fight,” directing them to a referee for their discovery disputes.

  • June 17, 2019

    In The Trade Hot Seat: What Congress May Ask Lighthizer

    U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer is in for a busy couple of days. He is slated to testify before House and Senate committees this week, where he is likely to face stern questioning from both sides of the aisle about the administration’s China strategy, a contentious trade deal vote and scores of other hot-button trade issues. Here, Law360 breaks down what to look for as lawmakers roll up their sleeves with the USTR.

  • June 17, 2019

    Fed. Circ. Upholds ITC Ban On Hyosung ATM Imports

    The International Trade Commission rightly banned Hyosung TNS Inc.’s ATM imports after finding that the South Korean company infringed a Diebold Nixdorf Inc. patent, the Federal Circuit said Monday.

  • June 17, 2019

    Huawei Can't Cut Redactions In Feds' Bid To DQ Sidley Atty

    A New York federal judge has ruled that prosecutors can largely keep in place the redactions in a motion to disqualify a former deputy attorney general, now with Sidley Austin LLP, from representing Chinese technology company Huawei against claims it was deceptive about its dealings in Iran.

  • June 17, 2019

    S. Korean Co. Wasn't Dumping Copper Alloy, Commerce Says

    The U.S. Department of Commerce has declined to impose tariffs on a South Korean exporter of phosphor copper after finding it did not sell copper in the U.S. at an unfair value, according to a notice published Monday in the Federal Register.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Conrad Reviews 'The Jury Crisis'

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    In "The Jury Crisis," jury consultant and social psychologist Drury Sherrod spotlights the vanishing jury trial, providing a fascinating canary-in-the-coal-mine warning for lawyers, litigants and society at large, says U.S. District Judge Robert Conrad of the Western District of North Carolina.

  • Working With Foreign Parties In Real Estate Transactions

    Excerpt from Lexis Practice Advisor
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    As more and more U.S. real estate is bought and sold by foreign investors, it is becoming increasingly important for real estate attorneys to understand the added complexities that may arise in transactions involving foreign parties, say Spencer Compton of First American Title Insurance Company and attorney Diane Schottenstein.

  • A Reminder To Address Sanctions Compliance Shortfalls

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    The sanctions enforcement action and major settlement with Standard Chartered highlights U.S. and U.K. regulators’ continued focus on compliance, and their specific attention to the lapses in internal controls that led to the alleged violations, say attorneys with Paul Hastings.

  • Revamping Your Approach To Client Development

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    As a former general counsel for both public and private companies, my advice to law firm attorneys who want to attract and keep clients is simple — provide certain legal services for free, says Noel Elfant, founder of General Counsel Practice.

  • What Lawyers Must Know Before Acting As Escrow Agents

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    The moment an attorney agrees to serve as an escrow agent for a client, the attorney assumes some of the most important obligations in the legal profession. Significantly, these obligations potentially extend to third parties who are not clients, say Scott Watnik and Michael Contos of Wilk Auslander.

  • Freelance Attorneys Are An Asset To In-House Legal Teams

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    With recent technological advances and a broader acceptance of flexible work arrangements, the opportunity for freelance attorneys is greater than ever, as is the value that this freelance workforce can create for companies, says Ben Levi of InCloudCounsel.

  • 5 Principles For Responding To Government Investigations

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    While not every government-issued subpoena will lead to a multiyear probe, criminal fines, forfeiture and disgorgement — like the U.S. government’s recently settled bribery investigation into Mobile TeleSystems — five key fundamentals can provide an instrument to triage and resolve such inquires on more favorable terms, says Holly Drumheller Butler of Miles & Stockbridge.

  • Book Excerpt

    'Big Tech' Questions Echo Early Days Of US Corporate Law

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    The current calls to curb the power of Google, Facebook and Amazon recall an earlier time in American history, when the “bigness” of oil, steel and tobacco was front and center in national politics. And in those debates, the top lawyers of the day had a major voice, says John Oller, author of the new book "White Shoe."

  • OFAC Is Raising The Compliance Bar

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    Last week's settlement with Stanley Black & Decker is the most recent enforcement action in which the U.S. Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control appears to be communicating, in uncharacteristically direct terms, heightened compliance expectations for pre- and post-acquisition companies, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • How EU Businesses Are Responding To US Sanctions On Iran

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    Because the United States scrapped the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, large EU companies with substantial U.S. exposure will likely suspend business with Iran, but the European Union's protective measures against U.S. sanctions should provide some comfort to smaller businesses, says Kartik Mittal of Zaiwalla & Co.

  • Grindr, CFIUS And The National Security Risks Of Dating

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    The Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States reportedly ordered Chinese technology firm Kunlun to sell its interest in the dating app Grindr, which suggests an increase in scrutiny of foreign investments in U.S. businesses that collect or maintain sensitive personally identifying information, say attorneys with Ropes & Gray.

  • Managing Gov't Supply Chain In An Age Of Protectionism

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    Aerospace, defense and government services companies must be prepared for significant supply-chain management challenges from the U.S., including recent efforts to encourage government contractors to use U.S.-manufactured materials, more aggressive enforcement of customs and duties laws, and increased enforcement under the False Claims Act, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • What Real Estate Attys Can Learn From MIPIM

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    Jane Smith and Jarret Stephens of Norton Rose highlight some of the global perspectives and trends showcased at Marché International des Professionnels d'Immobilier, a recent international property conference in France.

  • CFIUS 2.0 Roundup: The Pilot Program, The Shoulder Shrug

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    Last year's Foreign Investment Risk Review Modernization Act ushered in a new era for the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States. Perhaps the clearest lesson is that a short-form filing with CFIUS often will result in a nondecision by the committee, say Stephen Heifetz and Joshua Gruenspecht of Wilson Sonsini.

  • Brexit Risk-Disclosure Considerations For US Reporting Cos.

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    Following recent remarks on Brexit by officials from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the U.K.'s Financial Conduct Authority, attorneys with Norton Rose Fulbright discuss the potential operational, financial and accounting risks posed by different Brexit scenarios that boards and audit committees should discuss in company disclosures.

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