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White Collar

  • June 6, 2019

    Judge Wants Psych Eval For Convicted NJ GOP Powerbroker

    A New Jersey federal judge wants a psychological evaluation of a Gilmore & Monahan PA name partner and former Republican leader facing prison time for tax violations prior to his sentencing, citing “perplexing” conduct that she said sets him apart from the typical criminal.

  • June 6, 2019

    Newbury Trustee Says Firm's Negligence Stoked $65M Fraud

    The liquidating trustee appointed under the confirmed Chapter 11 plan of real estate firm Newbury Common Associates LLC filed an adversary complaint Thursday in Delaware alleging law firm Berkowitz Trager & Trager LLC failed to perform its professional duties and helped perpetuate a $65 million fraud that led to its bankruptcy.

  • June 6, 2019

    Feds Flag Potential BigLaw Conflicts In 'Varsity Blues'

    Federal prosecutors in the "Varsity Blues" case flagged several potential conflicts for BigLaw firms representing multiple parents in the college admissions cheating scandal, including Boies Schiller Flexner LLP, Latham & Watkins LLP, Nixon Peabody LLP and Ropes & Gray LLP.

  • June 6, 2019

    Platinum Jury Hears Of Exec's Dread, As Feds Wrap Up Case

    Brooklyn federal prosecutors on Thursday neared the end of their securities fraud case against three former top executives of Platinum Partners, and jurors saw emails depicting trepidation inside the now-defunct hedge fund as it tried in vain to get out of a liquidity crisis.

  • June 6, 2019

    Unintentional Atty Biases Can Hurt Corporate Clients

    Attorneys could be more effective counselors to corporate clients by realizing that things like bias and the pressure to obey a manager can shape their advice, according to a paper made available online Wednesday.

  • June 6, 2019

    Sandusky Prosecutor Facing Possible 1-Year Suspension

    The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania's Disciplinary Conduct Board recommended Thursday a suspension of just over a year for former Jerry Sandusky prosecutor Frank Fina over allegations he broke professional conduct rules when investigating a possible cover-up by Penn State officials.

  • June 6, 2019

    Woodbridge CEO's $1.3B Ponzi Trial Delayed To Late Summer

    A Florida federal judge on Thursday allowed the start date for the criminal trial of former Woodbridge Group owner and CEO Robert H. Shapiro over an alleged $1.3 billion Ponzi scheme to be pushed off from next week to late summer, but denied the government's request to delay the case until February.

  • June 6, 2019

    Snoop Dogg-Backed Pot Co. Accused of Conning Credit Cards

    Eaze, a Snoop Dogg-backed cannabis delivery company, has been accused of conning unwitting banks and credit card companies into processing payments for pot products in a lawsuit filed in California state court by a competing delivery company.

  • June 6, 2019

    House Dems Poised To Hold Trump Officials In Contempt

    House Democrats are gearing up for a vote Tuesday to hold Attorney General William Barr and other key lieutenants of President Donald Trump in contempt for not complying with subpoenas, paving the way for court cases testing their power to haul top officials before Congress.

  • June 6, 2019

    Radiology Biz Exec Charged With $2M Health Care Fraud

    A man allegedly defrauded Medicare and Medicaid out of approximately $2 million by billing them for X-ray services that his Cleveland-area radiology company did not provide, the U.S. Department of Justice said.

  • June 6, 2019

    Ex-Shire Unit Exec Reaches $2.5M Deal In Kickback Case

    The former president of a Shire PLC subsidiary will pay $2.5 million to end claims in Florida federal court that company salespeople used kickbacks and other shady means to push the use of a skin substitute product under his watch, the U.S. Department of Justice said Thursday.

  • June 6, 2019

    Accountant Pleads Guilty To Role In $550M Ponzi Scheme

    A third man implicated in a $550 million Ponzi scheme that duped investors including attorneys, athletes and bankers by promising high returns on consumer debt pled guilty to three of 14 charges in Maryland federal court, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday.

  • June 6, 2019

    Indicted Mass. Judge Seeks Info On Feds' Vows To Immigrant

    Attorneys for Massachusetts state court Judge Shelley Joseph, who was indicted for allegedly helping an unauthorized immigrant escape federal custody, requested additional discovery from the government Thursday, including evidence of any promises authorities may have made to the immigrant.

  • June 6, 2019

    SEC's $60M Deal Over Web Marketing Scam Gets Court OK

    A Florida federal judge has entered final judgment on a pair of settlements that require a group of internet marketers to pay $60 million connected to a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission suit accusing them of duping at least 75,000 investors out of millions with videos that promised quick profits.

  • June 6, 2019

    Profit Was Reverse Engineered At Fallen Fund, Jury Hears

    Former Premium Point Investments analyst Ashish Dole testified Thursday that CEO Anilesh "Neil" Ahuja led a plot to "reverse engineer" profits in what prosecutors call a $100 million scheme to game the value of mortgage-debt bundles at the now-bankrupt hedge fund.

  • June 6, 2019

    Avenatti Presses Calif. Court For Relaxed Travel Restrictions

    Counsel for Michael Avenatti sought to amend his pretrial travel conditions in California so that he can attend to his multiple out-of-state matters without requiring preapproval from the local U.S. attorney's office, asserting that the embattled attorney is not a flight risk.

  • June 6, 2019

    Cryptocurrency In For More Anti-Money Laundering Scrutiny

    Recent guidance from the U.S. Treasury Department has made it clearer than ever that the agency takes a broad view of its authority to regulate cryptocurrency businesses, signaling the potential for more civil anti-money laundering enforcement in the space while prosecutors continue to bring criminal cases.

  • June 6, 2019

    Feds Argue Wire Fraud Needs No Insider Trading Tweaks

    Prosecutors urged the Second Circuit on Wednesday to uphold convictions for insider trading on information from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, saying it was fine to allege the scheme was a wire fraud without adding requirements from other insider trading cases.

  • June 6, 2019

    NJ Construction Co. Head Cops To Tax Evasion, Ch. 7 Fraud

    The head of several New Jersey construction companies admitted in federal court Thursday to hiding more than $2 million in income from the government to avoid paying taxes and paying off debts when he filed for Chapter 7.

  • June 6, 2019

    SEC Sues Over Alleged $2.2M Bank Guarantee Fraud

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has sued an Atlanta-area man, his South Florida colleague and their companies, accusing them of tricking investors out of more than $2.2 million by selling phony letters of credit purporting to be from major banks.

  • June 6, 2019

    SEC Gets Partial TRO Against 'Ponzi-Like' Entities

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has scored a partial victory in its case against a landlord accused of running a $110 million "Ponzi-like" scheme, as a New York federal court agreed to force some entities into receivership but held off on doing the same for another.

  • June 6, 2019

    Michael Flynn Fires Covington Team In FBI Obstruction Case

    Ex-national security adviser Michael Flynn has fired his lawyers at Covington & Burling LLP who arranged his plea deal with former special counsel Robert Mueller on charges of lying to the FBI, according to a court motion filed Thursday.

  • June 6, 2019

    Feds Defend Raids On Ex-Locke Atty In Crypto Scam Case

    Federal prosecutors defended their seizure of evidence from properties belonging to former Locke Lord LLP attorney Mark S. Scott, arguing in New York federal court Wednesday that the warrants were based on ample probable cause and that the trial team never saw material protected by attorney-client privilege.

  • June 6, 2019

    Ex-Arizona Basketball Coach Gets 3 Months In Bribe Scheme

    A onetime basketball coach for the University of Arizona was sentenced Thursday in New York federal court to three months in prison for accepting $20,000 in bribes in exchange for steering young athletes to a sports agent, the first prison term for a coach in the scandal.

  • June 6, 2019

    Don't Suppress Our Evidence, Feds Say In Centra Tech Case

    Prosecutors asked a New York federal judge Wednesday to put an end to the crusade by a co-founder of the shuttered cryptocurrency company Centra Tech to suppress evidence seized during his arrest.

Expert Analysis

  • Guest Feature

    Leon Panetta In The Courtroom, Langley And Area 51

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    Over the course of his career, Leon Panetta has served as a U.S. representative, director of the CIA and secretary of defense. But before all that, he was a lawyer. Randy Maniloff of White and Williams LLP asked him about his legal background — and about little men from outer space.

  • At The Intersection Of Escobar, Touhy And Gov't Dismissal

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    Last week the head of the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Fraud Section warned False Claims Act defendants about using discovery as a tactic to solicit dismissal. The issue is further complicated in nonintervened FCA cases, where circuit courts apply vastly different review standards when an agency refuses to produce subpoenaed materials, says Derek Adams at Feldesman Tucker Leifer Fidell LLP.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Finding A Voice, And A New Home

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    My Fulbright scholarship project developed after I talked to my grandmother in the Philippines about the cost of her medication. Drugs developed in the U.S. and Europe are typically sold there for prices beyond the reach of many Filipinos. So I advocated for compulsory licensing for lifesaving medicines, says Melissa Martinez of McGuireWoods LLP.

  • Perspectives

    Sentencing Data Raise Major Questions About Guidelines

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    A 30-city report by the U.S. Sentencing Commission sheds new light on the prevalence of unwarranted sentencing disparities in federal cases, and should get more attention from prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges and the public, says Stephen Lee of Benesch Friedlander Coplan & Aronoff LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Willett Reviews 'Guilty Pleasures'

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    Professor Laura Little’s new book, "Guilty Pleasures: Comedy and Law in America," will make you laugh and make you think — and to a federal circuit judge who reads the Constitution for the articles, it is ... appealing, says Fifth Circuit Judge Don Willett.

  • International Pharma Rules Tighten Restrictions On Gifts

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    The International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers & Associations' revised code of practice specifically targets cultural gifts that may create the appearance of improper influence. Pharmaceutical companies will need to understand the differences and overlap between this ban and various countries' anti-bribery legislation, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray LLP.

  • Women In Law Need Equal Treatment, Not Affirmative Action

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    The sheer number of women entering the legal profession means gender equality is coming, one way or the other. This Women’s History Month, BigLaw firms should reflect on this with the understanding that they dismiss the flight of senior female attorneys from their ranks at their peril, says Tamara Kurtzman, founder of TMK Attorneys PC.

  • Making The Granston Memo Work For FCA Defendants

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    Since the January 2018 Granston memo leak, there has been an increase in False Claims Act case dismissals, indicating the U.S. Department of Justice is more receptive to defendants' arguments. Attorneys at Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP discuss what defense counsel should do to show cases merit Granston memo consideration.

  • New DOJ Opioid Cases Highlight Importance Of Red Flags

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    U.S. v. Oakley Pharmacy makes it clear that the federal government expects everyone in the opioid supply chain to “know their customers,” in the same way that banks and other financial institutions are required to do, say Michael Blume and Todd Halpern of Venable LLP.

  • Opinion

    Even Vile Defendants Deserve Good Representation

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    It's a sad day when a Harvard professor must defend himself for representing Hollywood movie mogul Harvey Weinstein. Criminal justice is not a popularity contest; at the foundation of our democracy is every defendant’s constitutional right to vigorous legal representation, says Lara Yaretsian, a Los Angeles-based criminal defense attorney.

  • Future Data Privacy Penalties May Include Prison Time

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    This year, Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., is likely to reintroduce legislation that calls for prison sentences for executives whose companies mishandle consumers’ data. Using the threat of prison time to change corporate behavior is not new, but Wyden's proposal is somewhat unusual, say Adam Saltzman and Heather Alleva of Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC.

  • Rebuttal

    Visible Diversity Is A Sign Of Organizational Health

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    A recent Law360 guest article cautioned against the hazards that can stem from pursuing "optimal" diversity, but overlooks the value of paying attention to visible diversity, says Matt Lykken of Potomac Law Group PLLC.

  • Emerging FINRA Priorities Include Digital Assets, Regtech

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    Based on the areas of concern highlighted in the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority's annual priorities letter, firms can expect more scrutiny from FINRA on online distribution platforms, digital assets businesses and regulatory technology, say attorneys at King & Spalding LLP.

  • Simple Secrets For Writing A Killer Brief

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    These days, the legal profession offers meager opportunity for oral argument, so we need to focus on being better, brighter, tighter writers. And the key to writing a better brief is grabbing your judge's attention with a persuasive, well-crafted story, says Daniel Karon of Karon LLC.

  • Criminal Forfeitures Are 'Alternate Remedies' Under The FCA

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    Though still an open question in the courts, the view that whistleblowers in cases that lead to criminal forfeiture should be entitled to a share of collected proceeds is supported by both the statutory language and legislative history of the False Claims Act, say David Caputo and Zachary Arbitman at Youman & Caputo LLC.

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