White Collar

  • June 17, 2022

    Arrest Ordered For Actor Accused Of Faking Viacom Emails

    A Manhattan federal judge on Friday ordered the arrest of a California actor charged with faking emails so that he could target two Hollywood executives and Viacom Inc. in a now-dismissed $50 million civil suit, after the actor failed to show up in court despite repeated warnings.

  • June 17, 2022

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This week in London has seen Uber take an English local authority for a ride over licensing agreements, the secretary of state for justice sued by convicted fraudster Giovanni Di Stefano, and the BBC put in the spotlight over the rights to an episode from its hit TV crime drama "Silent Witness."

  • June 16, 2022

    Behind The Jan. 6 Panel, A BigLaw Vet Digs Up The Dirt

    The chief investigative counsel for the House of Representatives select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol has carved out an unfortunately in-demand legal niche: Getting to the bottom of violent political unrest in the U.S.

  • June 16, 2022

    Tesla Investor Hits Musk With Suit Over 'Toxic' Workplace

    A Tesla Inc. investor hit CEO Elon Musk and the company's board with a derivative complaint in Texas federal court Thursday that alleges a "toxic" workplace culture is exposing the business to "enormous" liability, citing several high-profile civil lawsuits filled by current and former workers.

  • June 16, 2022

    Avenatti Cops To Stealing From Clients, Without A Plea Deal

    Michael Avenatti, who's already serving five years for trying to extort $25 million from Nike and for defrauding his former client Stormy Daniels, pled guilty Thursday in California federal court to four counts of wire fraud and one count of tax fraud, without a plea agreement with prosecutors.

  • June 16, 2022

    Shifty Ransomware Crews Spark Sanctions Concerns

    A recent trend of cybercriminals attempting to mislead targets about their identities has made matters more difficult for attack victims tasked with deciding quickly whether a ransomware payout might breach government sanctions, industry attorneys say.

  • June 16, 2022

    UK Man Selling Whiskey Part Of $13M Scam, Feds Say

    A U.K. man charged in federal court in northern Ohio is accused of participating in a scam where at least 150 investors lost more than $13 million after being told they were putting money toward expensive whiskeys and wines.

  • June 16, 2022

    Claims Termed Stale In Del. Battle Over Riviera Estate

    An attorney for the widow of a wealthy international businessman and convicted fraudster argued in Delaware's Chancery Court on Thursday that time had run out on counterclaims filed by entities battling the widow's claims to control of a $25 million French Riviera estate and other assets.

  • June 16, 2022

    Ex-IT Exec Gets 4 Years For $3M Union Benefits Fraud

    A former information technology executive for health and retirement funds of the Screen Actors Guild and American Federation of Television and Radio Artists on Thursday was sentenced to four years in prison, after admitting to his role in a $3 million fake invoice and kickback scheme.

  • June 16, 2022

    NFL's GC Testifies To Fake Insurance Calls In $63M Fraud Trial

    The National Football League's general counsel took the stand Thursday in a $63 million health care fraud trial against a Long Island medical biller, telling jurors he was impersonated on phone calls with NFL insurance processors.

  • June 16, 2022

    Jan. 6 Hearing Details Pressure Campaign On Pence

    Former Vice President Mike Pence faced relentless pressure from Donald Trump and an attorney advising the then-president to block the electoral count in Congress and overturn the 2020 election results, according to testimony Thursday at a hearing of the House committee investigating the attack on the U.S. Capitol.

  • June 16, 2022

    Stimwave Gets OK To Tap $12M In Bankruptcy Financing

    A Delaware bankruptcy court judge approved $12 million in interim financing for medical device company Stimwave Technologies at a first-day hearing Thursday, overruling objections from equity holders that the company was shutting them out.

  • June 16, 2022

    Cushman Can't Halt NY AG's Subpoenas In Trump Probe

    Former Trump Organization appraisal firm Cushman & Wakefield must comply with subpoenas from New York's attorney general in her probe of former President Donald Trump's business dealings after a state appeals court declined to pause the requests Thursday.

  • June 16, 2022

    Sporting Goods Biz Owner Hid Foreign Accounts, Feds Say

    Federal prosecutors are seeking to collect nearly $2.3 million in civil penalties from the owner of a suburban Atlanta sporting goods store for allegedly failing to report his financial holdings in foreign banks for several years.

  • June 16, 2022

    Trading Firm Loses 2nd Circ. Appeal To Dodge $7.5M SEC Fine

    The Second Circuit has affirmed a lower court's order for day-trading firm Avalon FA Ltd. and two of its traders to each pay $7.5 million in civil penalties to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission after they were previously found liable for defrauding investors.

  • June 16, 2022

    Ark. Prof Gets 1 Year For Lying To FBI About China Patents

    A former University of Arkansas chemical engineering professor targeted in a controversial Trump-era counterespionage initiative was sentenced to a year and a day in prison Thursday for lying to the FBI about patents he held in China.

  • June 16, 2022

    Chinese Billionaire Denied Ch. 11 Exit With Yacht On The Way

    A Connecticut bankruptcy judge received a report saying the yacht at the center of exiled Chinese billionaire Ho Wan Kwok's Chapter 11 case should be back in U.S. waters by the end of the month, while denying a motion to end the bankruptcy case at the same time.

  • June 16, 2022

    Okla. Attys Charged In Alleged Medical Pot Licensing Scheme

    Two Oklahoma attorneys have been charged with conspiring to skirt the state's residency requirements for medical marijuana operators, the state attorney general announced Thursday.

  • June 16, 2022

    Actor Faces Possible Arrest After Failing To Show Up In NY

    A California actor could be arrested after he was a no-show in New York federal court Thursday for a criminal case alleging he faked emails so that he could target two Hollywood executives and Viacom Inc. in a now-dismissed $50 million civil suit.

  • June 16, 2022

    Jan. 6 Panel May Call Ginni Thomas To Testify

    The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol may seek an interview with Virginia "Ginni" Thomas, the wife of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, amid new revelations about her contact with a lawyer at the center of the panel's investigation, according to multiple reports Thursday.

  • June 16, 2022

    NYC Can't Seal Prosecutor Misconduct Complaints

    The city of New York can't use the confidentiality of attorney disciplinary proceedings to keep a group of law professors from publishing their complaints of prosecutorial misconduct, a New York federal court has ruled.

  • June 16, 2022

    Ind. High Court Suspends Ex-Casino GC After Tax Fraud Plea

    The former general counsel and vice president of an Indiana gaming company has been suspended from practicing law in the state after he pled guilty to tax fraud in April.

  • June 16, 2022

    Dogecoin Buyer Accuses Musk Of Fraud In $258B Suit

    A dogecoin buyer sued Elon Musk, Tesla and SpaceX for $258 billion on Thursday, saying they orchestrated a pyramid scheme by hyping the joke cryptocurrency, which has since plunged in value.

  • June 16, 2022

    Ex-Celtic Attacker Denied New Trial On Separate Charge

    A man convicted of assaulting former Boston Celtics star Paul Pierce in 2000 won't get a new trial for an unrelated attack years later due to alleged issues with his defense lawyer's trial decisions, the First Circuit said Wednesday.

  • June 16, 2022

    'Varsity Blues' Dad Acquitted In Lone Loss For Prosecutors

    A Boston federal jury on Thursday acquitted a Massachusetts businessman on charges he bribed his daughter's way into Georgetown University through illicit payments to the elite school's tennis coach, ending the government's clean record of convictions in the "Varsity Blues" investigation.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: Uber Counsel Talks Safety Standards

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    Katie Waitzman at Uber discusses how in-house counsel can use environmental, social and corporate governance principles to bridge risk and innovation, as exemplified by the company’s recent women’s safety initiatives.

  • Opinion

    Prospectively Appointing Jackson To High Court Is Unlawful

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    President Joe Biden should rescind his prospective appointment of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to the U.S. Supreme Court as the decision contradicts the court's reasoning in Marbury v. Madison, raises gravely troubling issues regarding presidential discretion and brings a serious question about her legitimacy as a justice, says attorney John Reeves.

  • Prosecution Of NY Lender Marks Shift In PPP Enforcement

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's recent charges against a New York lender over Paycheck Protection Program fraud — the first to target a lender, rather than recipient, of pandemic relief money — likely presage increased government scrutiny of bank and nonbank PPP lenders, says Elisha Kobre at Bradley Arant.

  • Best Practices For Avoiding Bank Reference Letter Scams

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    Recent streaming series highlight the risks con artists can pose to banks — a reminder for financial institutions to take precautions when writing client reference letters, ​​​​​​​which fraudsters may use to establish legitimacy to perpetuate their scams, says Kevin Paule at Hill Ward.

  • Perspectives

    Time To Fix Legal Industry's Environmental Pro Bono Problem

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    As we observe Earth Month, it's sobering to note that pro bono environmental law work lags behind other practice areas — but the good news is that there are numerous organizations that can help lawyers get connected with environment-related pro bono projects, says Matthew Karmel at Riker Danzig.

  • What Federal Web3 Initiatives Mean For Fintech Professionals

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    Cybersecurity consultant John Reed Stark examines several recent federal initiatives related to the emerging decentralized stage of the internet, or Web3, and highlights immediate action items for financial firms exploring cryptocurrency-related activities.

  • Remembering An Underappreciated Legal Skill — Listening

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    Education around listening skills is often neglected amid the dominance of visual media and written communication, and failed lawyering often comes down to an inability to listen accurately, so educators and law firms must prioritize the skill in their training programs, says James Flynn at Epstein Becker.

  • M&A Takeaways From ABA Antitrust Meeting

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    The American Bar Association's recent Antitrust Law Spring Meeting highlighted current and proposed progressive merger enforcement reforms — some of which could raise due process concerns and jeopardize the legitimacy of future enforcement actions, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Attorneys Can Promote Trade, Security Amid Global Conflict

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    As nations take sovereign action to fight Russia’s aggression against Ukraine and the international rule of law, attorneys can combine their legal and business tools to help the global systems of trade and security in these troubled times, say Thomas Grant at Cambridge University and Scott Kieff at George Washington University.

  • How Cos. Can Respond To ESG Focus In SEC Exam Priorities

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    Following the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's recent release of its examination priorities, businesses can address the agency's focus on environmental, social and corporate governance investing and mitigate the risk of regulatory scrutiny by reevaluating company practices and accurately portraying their products' environmental effects, say Rebecca Fike and Kelly Rondinelli at V&E.

  • Series

    The Future Of Legal Ops: Reining In Outside Counsel Costs

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    In-house legal departments are under increasing pressure to control spending on outside counsel, but traditional cost-cutting methods — law firm panels, alternative fee arrangements and alternative legal service providers — are limited, making it necessary to establish a more competitive law firm engagement process, say John Burke and Vincenzo Purificato at UBS.

  • When Congress Seeks Cos.' Nonpublic Info From Regulators

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    Increasingly, congressional investigators seek out private parties' confidential documents from the federal agencies that regulate them — and because Congress is uniquely empowered to override nondisclosure protections surrounding nonpublic information, companies must understand the rules and risks involved, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Health Care Is In DOJ's Criminal Antitrust Crosshairs

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's criminal antitrust enforcement in health care has picked up significant momentum in recent years, notably in the industry's labor market, amplifying the importance of proactive compliance programs, say Dylan Carson and Antonio Pozos at Faegre Drinker.

  • Enforcement Takeaways From ABA Antitrust Meeting

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    The American Bar Association's recent Antitrust Law Spring Meeting offers signs that the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice will be taking on tough cases such as those involving criminal Section 2 enforcement and labor market practices, reminding businesses that they should avoid even the appearance of noncompliance, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • SDNY Atty's Comments Shed Light On Private Funds Focus

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    Recent remarks from U.S. Attorney Damian Williams offer insight into the activities the Southern District of New York is focusing on — including fraud at private equity and hedge funds — and provide useful best practices for managing white collar risk, says Ilan Graff at Fried Frank.

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