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White Collar

  • June 14, 2019

    Prenda 'Porn Troll' Attorney Sentenced To 14 Years

    Paul Hansmeier, a former attorney who filed thousands of copyright suits over pornography in an elaborate scheme known as Prenda Law, was sentenced Friday to 14 years in prison.

  • June 14, 2019

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen Citibank, ING and a number of other banks sue Sudan and the country's central bank, a London derivatives broker file an appeal against a rival that's accused it of poaching employees and foreign exchange specialists Monex sue two former workers. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • June 14, 2019

    China-Owned NY Broker-Dealer Admits To Antitrust Violation

    A broker-dealer owned by the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Ltd. pled guilty Friday to rigging bids for American depositary receipts, agreeing to pay a $3.26 million fine after a Manhattan federal judge cited its "substantial assistance" in an ongoing antitrust investigation.

  • June 13, 2019

    Man Charged With $4.7M Sanofi Insider Trading Scheme

    A Swiss businessman has been charged in the U.S. with insider trading ahead of Sanofi SA's acquisition of Bioverativ Inc. last year in an alleged get-rich-quick scheme that netted cash and stock options worth $4.7 million, prosecutors announced on Thursday.

  • June 13, 2019

    Prosecutors Add More Execs, Claims In Abraaj Criminal Suit

    A New York federal judge unsealed an indictment Wednesday adding three Abraaj Group executives and more than a dozen new claims to a lawsuit over what prosecutors called the "largest collapse of a private equity firm in history."

  • June 13, 2019

    Leader In $500M Tax Scam Can Await Trial In Jail: 10th Circ.

    A man awaiting trial without bail in a $511 million tax fraud case must remain in prison even though he has been there longer than federal statutes guaranteeing a speedy trial state, the Tenth Circuit said Thursday.

  • June 13, 2019

    Litigation Funder Can't Recoup $5.8M From Deepwater Claims

    A litigation funding company that lost a $5.8 million investment in mass tort claims stemming from the Deepwater Horizon disaster can't revive its claims that prominent plaintiffs' firm Watts Guerra LLP wasn't diligent in signing up potential clients, a Texas appellate court ruled.

  • June 13, 2019

    Crypto Co. Investors Seek Class Certification In Fraud Suit

    Investors in the now-defunct cryptocurrency company Centra Tech urged a Florida federal court to certify their class in a suit accusing Centra of faking licensing agreements with major credit card companies to solicit investment in its $32 million initial coin offering.

  • June 13, 2019

    Mich. Prosecutors Drop Flint Charges, Restart Investigation

    Michigan prosecutors working on Flint's lead-contaminated drinking water disaster on Thursday said an earlier criminal investigation was inadequate and called out the previous prosecutors for allowing Varnum LLP, Dykema Gossett PLLC and Warner Norcross + Judd LLP to have a say in what evidence state agencies turned over.

  • June 13, 2019

    Bipartisan Reps Take Another Stab At 'Hack-Back' Bill

    A bipartisan pair of lawmakers on Thursday reintroduced legislation that would carve out a legal path for companies to hack back into the networks of their alleged attackers — as long as they alert authorities and follow a set of rules.

  • June 13, 2019

    NY Regulator Looks To Extend Deutsche Bank Monitorship

    New York’s top financial services regulator isn’t yet satisfied with Deutsche Bank’s progress on strengthening its anti-money laundering compliance programs under a 2017 consent order and is moving to keep an outside monitor at the bank for longer, Law360 confirmed Thursday.

  • June 13, 2019

    Ex-Theranos Execs' Bid For Docs Is Unreasonable, Feds Say

    Prosecutors urged a judge on Wednesday to reject a bid by two former Theranos executives to make prosecutors go hunting through other agencies' files, saying that they’ve already persuaded the agencies to help the pair and that a court order on the issue would set a bad precedent.

  • June 13, 2019

    Atty Can't Nix $18M Tax Evasion Row Over Stalling Claims

    A federal judge rejected an attorney's request to dismiss allegations that he repatriated more than $18 million in untaxed earnings, saying additional time granted to the U.S. did not violate his right to a speedy trial.

  • June 13, 2019

    Calif. Rep.'s Wife Pleads Guilty In Campaign Fund Case

    Margaret E. Hunter, the wife of U.S. Rep. Duncan D. Hunter, pled guilty on Thursday and agreed to cooperate with prosecutors in a case in California federal court accusing her and her husband of using more than $250,000 in campaign funds to pay for personal expenses.

  • June 13, 2019

    NY Wholesaler Pleads Guilty To Fake Military Gear Charges

    A wholesaler from Brooklyn has pled guilty in Rhode Island federal court to charges stemming from the peddling of $20 million worth of phony, Chinese-made uniforms and gear to the U.S. military and government, the Department of Justice said Thursday.

  • June 13, 2019

    Crooked Fund CEO Demoted Me, Finance Pro Tells Jury

    A career finance pro told Manhattan jurors Thursday that the CEO of Premium Point Investments became angry and demoted him when he complained about what he called rampant overvaluing of mortgage-debt assets at the now-bankrupt hedge fund.

  • June 13, 2019

    DOJ Extends Wire Act Grace Period Through End Of Year

    The U.S. Department of Justice said it won't enforce the Wire Act beyond its provisions against sports betting through the end of the year after a New Hampshire federal judge shot down the DOJ's decision to expand the statute to include all types of interstate gambling.

  • June 13, 2019

    UK Signs US Extradition Request For Julian Assange

    U.K. Home Secretary Sajid Javid has rubber-stamped a request to extradite WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to the U.S. ahead of a hearing at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on Friday.

  • June 12, 2019

    UCLA Gynecologist Accused Of Sexual Assault By Patient

    A patient of a University of California, Los Angeles, gynecologist accused the doctor of sexual assault, in a complaint filed in California state court Tuesday, hitting the doctor and university regents with a slew of claims.

  • June 12, 2019

    StarKist Says $100M Fine For Tuna Price-Fixing Is Too High

    StarKist Co. told a California federal judge Wednesday that the U.S. Department of Justice's proposed $100 million criminal fine for its role in a multiyear conspiracy to fix prices of canned tuna is too high and could require the tuna company to explore selling off its assets.

  • June 12, 2019

    Wall St. Cop Stakes Its Turf In 1st Crowdfunding Decision

    The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority recently flexed its power to police crowdfunding websites with a panel's first litigated enforcement action against a funding portal, a move that laid out novel interpretations of the organization’s rules and set up a possible countersuit.  

  • June 12, 2019

    San Francisco DA To Use AI To Curtail Racial Bias In Charges

    San Francisco's district attorney is hoping artificial intelligence that automatically eliminates race information from police incident reports, likely the first of its kind in the nation, can help prevent implicit bias from seeping into charging decisions made by prosecutors.

  • June 12, 2019

    Calif. Rep.'s Wife To Change Plea On Campaign Fund Charges

    Margaret E. Hunter, the wife of U.S. Rep. Duncan D. Hunter, is set to change her not guilty plea in a case accusing her and her husband of using more than $250,000 in campaign funds to pay for personal expenses, according to a Wednesday docket entry.

  • June 12, 2019

    Feds Roasted On Proof In CEO's $3M Bank Fraud Conviction

    A Florida federal judge chided federal prosecutors Wednesday over their proof for a wire fraud charge against a former medical device company executive over a bad $3 million check, which was part of his conviction in connection with a $100 million fraud scheme that toppled one of Puerto Rico's largest banks.

  • June 12, 2019

    Another Iranian Military Force-Related Co. Sanctioned

    An apparent financial conduit of Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps has been sanctioned for allegedly trafficking hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of weapons to the military force’s Iraqi-backed militias, the U.S. Department of the Treasury announced Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • A Slim New Rule Of Criminal Procedure

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    Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court adopted a new procedural rule for pretrial criminal discovery. The impact of Rule 16.1 will result not from what is in the text, but from what is missing, says Mario Nguyen of Locke Lord.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Cleary Chief Talent Officer Hy Pomerance

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    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Amanda Brady and Dustin Laws talk with Hy Pomerance, chief talent officer of Cleary.

  • What To Expect When You’re Expecting A Compliance Monitor

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    Out of three corporate Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement actions in the first quarter of 2019, two included agreements to retain an independent compliance monitor. Yuliya Kuchma of Baker McKenzie explains how companies can make the most of a monitorship experience.

  • Rebuttal

    Forced Arbitration Is A Far Worse 'Product' Than Jury Trials

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    Jury trials are not dying because arbitration is a “better product,” as alleged in a recent Law360 guest article, but because corporations have rigged the system through forced arbitration to ensure they cannot be held accountable before a judge or jury, say attorneys at Hagens Berman.

  • Guest Feature

    Preet Bharara On The Human Factor In The Justice System

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    A key theme in Preet Bharara's new book is the enormous role the human element plays in the administration of justice. The former U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York discussed this theme, among other topics, in a recent conversation with White and Williams attorney Randy Maniloff.

  • Gov't Contractors, Be Prepared For FCA Parallel Proceedings

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    The continued sprawl of False Claims Act cases warrants scrutiny of one of the statute's less understood characteristics — one set of facts can lead to concurrent or successive proceedings initiated by a combination of criminal, civil or administrative authorities, as well as private plaintiffs, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • Justice Department's ACA Reversal Raises FCA Questions

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's about-face on Affordable Care Act constitutionality may discourage potential whistleblowers from coming forward unless the DOJ clarifies its plans to enforce the False Claims Act, says Cleveland Lawrence III of Mehri & Skalet.

  • Rebuttal

    Jury Trials, Though In Decline, Are Well Worth Preserving

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    In a recent Law360 guest article, the author applauded the disappearance of jury trials as an inefficient, costly mechanism, but in doing so he overlooked the greater value of jury trials for our justice system, says Stephen Susman, executive director of the Civil Jury Project at NYU School of Law.

  • A Broader View Of The US Supreme Court Bar

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    During the past 15 years, three widely read articles bolstered by starstruck media have promulgated the incorrect perception — sorely in need of revision — that the U.S. Supreme Court bar is limited to a handful of elite lawyers, says Lawrence Ebner of Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • Takeaways From DOJ Action Against Telemedicine Fraud

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    Recently unsealed indictments from the U.S. Department of Justice make clear that telemedicine will continue to be an enforcement focus at a time when telemedicine is expanding, and should remind providers to focus on compliance obligations, say Edgar Bueno and Matthew Wilmot of Morris Manning.

  • Opinion

    Jury Trials Are In Decline For Good Reason

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    A recent Law360 article reported on federal judges bemoaning jury trials' nationwide decline, but these laments are unfounded as jury trials have been replaced by better alternatives, says J.B. Heaton of J.B. Heaton Research.

  • Few Avenues To Protection For Foreign FCPA Whistleblowers

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    The Ninth Circuit's recent decision in Wadler v. Bio-Rad falls within a larger pattern of federal courts interpreting whistleblower protection statutes narrowly — especially when employees raise allegations about international business and potential Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations abroad, say Daniel Wendt and Amelia Hairston-Porter of Miller & Chevalier.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Circuitous Path To The Law

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    Instead of going to college after high school, I followed in my father’s footsteps and became an electrician. Later I became an electrical engineer, and then an IP attorney. Every twist and turn along the way has made me a better lawyer, says Joseph Maraia of Burns & Levinson.

  • Getting Compliance Right When There Are No Regulations

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    Recent enforcement actions and agency guidance illustrate how the federal government sets expectations for corporate compliance internal controls, even when no formal regulations have been issued. But companies must know where to find the relevant information, says Jo Ritcey-Donohue of JRD Law.

  • 4 Tips For Global Patient Support Compliance: Part 2

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    As constructing global frameworks for patient support compliance becomes increasingly important, health care companies should make sure to clearly mandate a proper purpose, protect patient data, and plan for the training and monitoring of third parties, say attorneys at Paul Hastings in the final part of this article.

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