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International Trade

  • June 21, 2018

    Chinese Man Accused Of Smuggling Submarine Tech

    A Chinese man who is a lawful permanent resident of Massachusetts was accused on Thursday of illegally exporting submarine detection equipment for a Chinese military research institute that has been flagged by the U.S. Department of Commerce for national security concerns.

  • June 21, 2018

    Japan, S. Korea Poised For WTO Clash Over Steel Duties

    The Japanese government has brought a World Trade Organization case challenging South Korea’s decision to maintain anti-dumping duties on its stainless steel bars, according to a WTO document circulated Thursday.

  • June 21, 2018

    Insurer Can't Recover Costs From Engine Transport Snafu

    An insurer for a General Electric unit cannot put shipping company Agility Logistics Corp. on the hook for the costs to inspect a jet engine that Agility failed to transport properly, a New York federal judge ruled Thursday, holding that the insurance company’s suit is barred under an international treaty because the engine was not damaged in transit.

  • June 21, 2018

    Oman Sues US Mining Co. Owner Over Unpaid $5.6M Award

    Oman sued a U.S. mining company owner in Massachusetts federal court Tuesday alleging he has failed to pay any part of a $5.6 million arbitration award issued against him by an International Center for Settlement of Investment Disputes tribunal in a dispute over mining leases.

  • June 21, 2018

    Google Urged To Drop Huawei Collab Over Security Concerns

    A bipartisan group of U.S. lawmakers has asked Google to rethink its relationship with Chinese smartphone maker Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd., which some American intelligence officials have flagged as a national security threat.

  • June 21, 2018

    Venezuela Must Pay $101.6M Award, Food Products Co. Says

    Vestey Group Ltd. enlisted the help of a D.C. federal court to enforce a $101.6 million award against Venezuela that was issued after the cash-strapped South American nation wrested control of the British food products company's nearly 100-year-old cattle ranching operation in the country.

  • June 21, 2018

    Rubio Pushes Tough Line On Chinese Tariffs, Tech Sanctions

    Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., applauded recently announced tariffs on Chinese imports Thursday while slamming the Trump administration’s reversal on a decision to lock telecommunications company ZTE out of the U.S., saying firm measures are needed to address intellectual property theft and national security threats posed by China.

  • June 21, 2018

    Producers Urge Commerce, ITC To Probe Chinese Steel Racks

    A group of U.S. rack producers has urged the U.S. Department of Commerce and U.S. International Trade Commission to impose tariffs on steel racks imported from China, which they claim are being sold in the country at less than fair value and are hurting the domestic industry.

  • June 21, 2018

    ITC Is Asked To Probe Amazon, Target Over Carburetor IP

    A Michigan-based engine parts manufacturer has accused several companies, including Amazon, Target and Home Depot, of selling products containing imported carburetors that infringe five of its patents, the U.S. International Trade Commission said Thursday.

  • June 21, 2018

    GOP Sen. Blocks Ga. Justice Tapped By Trump For 11th Circ.

    Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., has become the first Republican to hold up one of President Donald Trump’s judicial picks, blocking the Eleventh Circuit nomination of Georgia Supreme Court Justice Britt Grant for a second time in the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday.

  • June 20, 2018

    CIT Affirms Lower Calculation Of Chinese Steel Nail Duties

    A U.S. steel nail producer lost its bid Tuesday to drive up anti-dumping duties on Chinese importers after a U.S. Court of International Trade judge upheld the U.S. Department of Commerce’s decision to apply the low tariff rate it calculated for one company to more than a dozen others.

  • June 20, 2018

    Trump, Lawmakers Make Limited Progress On ZTE Deal

    Lawmakers said Wednesday they had made some progress toward a deal to lift sanctions imposed on Chinese telecommunications equipment maker ZTE Corp. after a meeting with President Donald Trump, the day after a bipartisan bill to protect the federal supply chain, prompted in part by ZTE, was introduced in the Senate.

  • June 20, 2018

    CIT Sustains Commerce's Brazilian PET Film Scope Decision

    The U.S. Court of International Trade has sustained the U.S. Department of Commerce’s determination that a subset of polyethylene terephthalate film imported by a Brazilian company fell outside the scope of a 2013 anti-dumping duty order, after a previous CIT order found that Commerce needed to justify its reasoning.

  • June 20, 2018

    ITC Agrees To Duties On Citric Acid From 3 Countries

    The U.S. International Trade Commission determined Wednesday that citric acid and citrate salts from Belgium, Colombia and Thailand are being dumped in the U.S. market, leading the U.S. Department of Commerce to issue duties on the commodities.

  • June 20, 2018

    EU To Hit US With Retaliatory Tariffs On Friday

    The European Union on Friday plans to implement retaliatory tariffs on €2.8 billion ($3.2 billion) worth of U.S. products in retaliation for the Trump administration recently slapping double-digit tariffs on aluminum and steel products entering the United States from the continent’s economic bloc, it announced Wednesday.

  • June 20, 2018

    Sen. Wyden Presses Ross For Views On ZTE's Cyberthreat

    Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross evaded questions from Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., on the cybersecurity threats posed by ZTE Corp. on Wednesday as the lawmaker probed for answers about the Trump administration’s decision to give the Chinese telecom giant a reprieve for its sanctions violations.

  • June 20, 2018

    Utah Engineering Co. Settles Immigrant Discrimination Claims

    A Utah engineering company has settled with the federal government over claims it discriminated against noncitizen job applicants based on a misunderstanding of international defense export regulations, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Tuesday.

  • June 20, 2018

    S. Africa Fund Says Export Credit Agency Can't Escape Loan

    A South African investment fund has said a Canadian export credit agency and leasing vehicle was wrong to terminate the fund's aircraft lease, arguing in U.K. litigation that unfounded allegations of corruption against the owners of its parent company did not mean it had breached the terms of a loan agreement.

  • June 20, 2018

    Sens. Tee Off On Ross For Trump's Aggressive Trade Moves

    Senators on both sides of the aisle on Wednesday laid waste to the Trump administration's flurry of trade enforcement moves over the last six months, demanding answers from U.S. Department of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross about the direction of the White House's overall trade strategy.

  • June 19, 2018

    Apple Pushes Monopoly Concerns In Qualcomm ITC Fight

    Apple attorneys questioned an expert witness for Qualcomm on the potential competition effects of the chipmaker’s bid to ban Intel-equipped iPhones from the U.S. during a hearing Tuesday at the International Trade Commission, pressing a claim that a ban on imports of the phone could hand Qualcomm monopoly power and push Intel out of 5G development.

Expert Analysis

  • When Will The ITC Honor A PTAB Finding Of Invalidity?

    Bryan J. Vogel

    As a general rule, the U.S. International Trade Commission has given little to no deference to Patent Trial and Appeal Board decisions. However, recent decisions seem to throw a wrinkle into this lack of deference, say Bryan J. Vogel and Derrick J. Carman of Robins Kaplan LLP.

  • Trade Lessons From The ZTE Saga

    Erin Baldwin

    Less than two months after the U.S. government announced it was denying export privileges to Zhongxing Telecommunications Equipment Corp., it said that the denial order would be lifted pursuant to a new settlement with ZTE. The lessons from the ZTE saga are far from clear, but one takeaway is that enforcement actions may not always be final, say attorneys with Winston & Strawn LLP.

  • Mid-2018 Sanctions Review: A Turbulent Year So Far

    Ama Adams

    No superlative could aptly describe the magnitude of U.S. sanctions developments through the first six months of 2018. The pace of change has been so intense and complex that, understandably, even the most sophisticated international companies and investors have been challenged to respond to policy and regulatory developments, say attorneys with Ropes & Gray LLP.

  • Opinion

    BigLaw's Associate Salary Model Is A Relic Of A Bygone Era

    William Brewer

    Legal industry compensation practices are once again in the news as BigLaw firms continue to match the new high watermark of $190,000 for first-year associate salaries. The typical model of increasing associate salaries uniformly fails star associates, the firms they work for and, ultimately, the clients they serve, says William Brewer, managing partner of Brewer Attorneys & Counselors.

  • Opinion

    US Trading Partners Defy The Rules They Claim To Support

    Alan Price

    In March, President Donald Trump imposed tariffs on steel and aluminum imports pursuant to Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962. Subsequently, the European Union and certain other trading partners asserted that they could immediately retaliate — contradicting the World Trade Organization rules they claim to champion, say Alan Price and Robert DeFrancesco of Wiley Rein LLP.

  • Policy Is Changing For Technology Transfers

    Kevin O'Brien

    The Trump administration and Congress are tightening investment restrictions and export controls to address technology transfer concerns. These measures initially focus on China, but will have broader effects on investments in the United States and transfers of emerging technologies, say attorneys with Baker McKenzie.

  • #MeToo At Law Firms And What We Can Do About It

    Beth Schroeder.JPG

    While some may say it’s ironic, it’s also embarrassing and enraging that the very industry that offers anti-harassment training, policies and counsel now finds itself the subject of #MeToo headlines. The American Bar Association recommendation that will bring about the greatest change is the call to provide alternative methods for reporting violations, says Beth Schroeder, chair of Raines Feldman LLP's labor and employment group.

  • New Licenses Ease Ukraine, Russia Business Wind-Downs

    Seetha Ramachandran

    The U.S. Department of Treasury Office of Foreign Assets Control continues its effort to allow U.S. persons to wind down operations or existing contracts that would otherwise violate Ukraine- and Russia-related sanctions. Even though OFAC has issued general licenses for this purpose, U.S. persons may need to obtain specific licenses to fully divest their interests, say attorneys with Schulte Roth & Zabel LLP.

  • Knowledge Lawyers Can Help Firms Stay Ahead Of The Curve

    Vanessa Pinto Villa

    In a profession notoriously averse to change, it should come as no surprise that there is skepticism about the value of having attorneys perform nonbillable tasks. But U.S. law firms have slowly begun to incorporate knowledge lawyers into their operations — and the trend is likely to continue, says Vanessa Pinto Villa of Hogan Lovells.

  • Congressional Forecast: June

    Layth Elhassani

    In advance of their weeklong July 4 recess, members of Congress are pursuing a busy legislative schedule, focused on the fiscal year 2019 National Defense Authorization Act and other appropriations bills, reform of export controls, immigration and border security, and the farm bill authorization, says Layth Elhassani of Covington & Burling LLP.