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International Trade

  • December 13, 2018

    Arent Fox Nabs Ex-Shearman Atty For DC Tax Practice

    Arent Fox has announced a former Shearman & Sterling LLP partner is joining the firm’s tax practice in Washington, D.C., to assist clients with domestic and international transactional tax issues.

  • December 13, 2018

    Deutsche Bank Not Liable For Iran Bomb, 7th Circ. Says

    Deutsche Bank cannot be held liable for the death of a U.S. soldier killed in Iraq by a bomb supplied by Iran, the Seventh Circuit ruled Wednesday, saying the bank's violations of U.S. sanctions on Iran were too far removed from the soldier’s death to create liability under anti-terrorism law.

  • December 13, 2018

    Levi & Korsinsky To Lead Glencore Investor's FCPA Suit

    A New Jersey federal judge on Wednesday appointed Levi & Korsinsky LLP as lead counsel in a proposed class action against Glencore PLC over investor losses allegedly tied to announcements that the United Kingdom and the United States are investigating the Swiss company’s overseas dealings.

  • December 13, 2018

    NCAI Says $867B Farm Bill Would Benefit Native Tribes

    The $867 billion farm bill, passed by the House of Representatives on Wednesday, contains several provisions that would benefit native tribes through increased cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture on welfare-related contracts, the National Congress of American Indians said in a statement.

  • December 13, 2018

    Eletrobras Investors Get OK For $15M Bribery Settlement

    A New York federal court has approved investors' roughly $15 million settlement with Brazil's state-controlled power company Eletrobras, resolving allegations that executives misled shareholders about the company's financials to conceal their participation in a massive bribery scandal.

  • December 13, 2018

    ITC Will Review Patent Dispute Between Apple, Qualcomm

    The U.S. International Trade Commission will weigh in on an intellectual property dispute between Apple Inc. and Qualcomm Inc. over sales of iPhones found to infringe a Qualcomm patent, agreeing on Wednesday to reconsider whether the telecom giant's asserted patent is obvious and whether an import ban against the iPhones would be appropriate.

  • December 13, 2018

    Chinese Co. To Pay $2.77M To Settle Iran Trade Claims

    A China-based oil services company has agreed to pay $2.77 million to settle allegations that it violated U.S. regulations that limit trade of U.S.-originated goods with Iran, the Treasury Department said Wednesday.

  • December 12, 2018

    Congress Sends Sweeping $867B Farm Bill To Trump

    After an eight-month wrestling match about provisions ranging from food stamp work requirements to limits on farm subsidies, the House of Representatives passed an $867 billion farm bill Wednesday, sending a sweeping set of reforms to food and agriculture policy to President Donald Trump.

  • December 12, 2018

    EU-Japan Trade Pact Set To Take Effect In February

    The bilateral trade agreement between Japan and the European Union will take effect in February following its ratification by lawmakers Wednesday, effectively creating the largest free trade zone ever implemented by a regional trade accord.

  • December 12, 2018

    Fed. Circ. Sustains Tariffs On Chinese Solar Cells

    The Federal Circuit on Wednesday sustained a duty set by the U.S. Department of Commerce on solar cells from China, rejecting arguments from solar panel manufacturer SolarWorld Americas Inc. that the department had low-balled the Chinese exporters’ production costs when calculating the tariffs.

  • December 12, 2018

    US To Sign Deal With UK On Post-Brexit Insurance Trade

    The U.S. government said Wednesday that it intends to sign a sweeping agreement with the U.K. that will help American firms keep pushing into the world’s fourth-largest insurance market after Britain exits the European Union.

  • December 12, 2018

    MoFo Nabs Former OFAC Sanctions Official In DC

    Morrison & Foerster LLP has lured another attorney away from the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control, bolstering its national security practice in Washington, D.C., with his experience helping formulate sanctions policy, according to a Tuesday announcement.

  • December 12, 2018

    UK's May Survives But Weakened After Brexit Revolt In Party

    Prime Minister Theresa May survived a coup attempt by rebel lawmakers within her Conservative Party late Wednesday, winning a no-confidence vote by a sufficiently large margin to allow her to continue pushing to get a draft Brexit withdrawal agreement through a hostile Parliament.

  • December 12, 2018

    WTO Sits On Razor's Edge As US Spurns Reform Proposal

    The Trump administration rejected a proposal to reform the World Trade Organization’s dispute settlement system Wednesday, prolonging a two-year power play that has plunged Geneva into crisis mode.

  • December 12, 2018

    UK's May Faces No-Confidence Vote Over Brexit Plans

    Prime Minister Theresa May will face a vote of no-confidence from her own Conservative Party MPs on Wednesday evening as opposition to her plan to exit the European Union escalates, raising the prospect of a no-deal departure or no Brexit at all.

  • December 11, 2018

    Huawei Exec Granted Bail By Canadian Judge

    A Canadian judge granted bail on Tuesday to a top Huawei Technologies Co. executive facing extradition to the United States, the telecommunications giant announced.

  • December 11, 2018

    Dental Products Maker Expands IP War Against Rival At ITC

    A California-based dental products maker has added to its expanding intellectual property battle with a Danish rival over patents covering intraoral scanners and related equipment, filing two complaints Tuesday in Delaware federal court and one complaint Monday at the U.S. International Trade Commission.

  • December 11, 2018

    Commerce Calls For Hefty Furniture Tariff On Chinese Cos.

    The U.S. Department of Commerce has refused to spare eight Chinese furniture companies from a triple-digit tariff imposed on imports of wooden bedroom furniture from China, preliminarily lumping those exporters into the countrywide duty rate following its annual review of the decade-old tariff.

  • December 11, 2018

    Deals Rumor Mill: Cisco Systems, Plaid, Nvidia Corp.

    Cisco Systems Inc. is discussing a deal to buy Luxtera, Plaid was valued at $2.65 billion in a Mary Meeker-led funding round, and SoftBank wants to shed its stake in California-based Nvidia Corp.

  • December 11, 2018

    ITC Agrees To Probe Juul's E-Cig Rivals For Infringement

    The U.S. International Trade Commission has agreed to investigate whether the importation into the U.S. and the sales of certain electronic cigarette delivery systems by 21 companies violate federal tariff regulations and whether the devices should be barred from entry.

Expert Analysis

  • Guest Feature

    The Subtle Art Of Fred Fielding

    He was White House counsel to two presidents. When Reagan was shot, he explained the chain of command to a four-star general. And until a few years ago, many people still thought he was Deep Throat during the Watergate scandal. Fred Fielding of Morgan Lewis & Bockius may be the quintessential Washington insider. White and Williams attorney Randy Maniloff visits him to learn more.

  • How Brexit May Change UK Food Labeling Rules

    Ravi Randhawa

    Producers and distributors of food products in the U.K. will be pleased to know that, should there be a no-deal Brexit, they may not need to change food labels and packaging from day one, as the government is proposing grace periods for some required labeling changes, says Ravi Randhawa of Gowling WLG.

  • To Manage China Tariffs, Triage Supply Chains

    Laura Rabinowitz

    With no end in sight for Section 301 tariffs on goods imported from China, importers may want to examine supply chains for savings. Useful strategies include reviewing purchase order terms, shifting component production and using first sale to save on duties, says Laura Siegel Rabinowitz of Kelley Drye & Warren LLP.

  • 10 Tips For Law Firms To Drive Revenue Via Sports Tickets

    Matthew Prinn

    Many law firms have tickets or luxury suites at sporting events to host clients and prospects. Matthew Prinn of RFP Advisory Group and Matt Ansis of TicketManager discuss some of the ways that firms can use those tickets effectively.

  • Inside Key ABA Guidance On Attorneys' Cybersecurity Duties

    Joshua Bevitz

    A recent opinion from the American Bar Association provides useful guidance on attorneys’ obligations to guard against cyberattacks, protect electronic client information and respond if an attack occurs, says Joshua Bevitz of Newmeyer & Dillion LLP.

  • A Review Of US Economic Sanctions In 2018

    Ama Adams

    In 2018, the U.S. government strengthened sanctions targeting Iran, Russia and Venezuela, sanctioned an agency of the Chinese government and completed the second largest sanctions-related enforcement action on record. And the evidence suggests 2019 will be equally tumultuous, say attorneys with Ropes & Gray LLP.

  • Opening Comments: A Key Strategic Decision In Mediation

    Jann Johnson

    Opening comments by parties in mediation that are made with the proper content and tone can diffuse pent-up emotion and pave the way for a successful resolution. But an opening presentation can do more harm than good if delivered the wrong way, say Jann Johnson and William Haddad of ADR Systems LLC.

  • Sanctions Screening Lessons From OFAC Cobham Settlement

    Roberto Gonzalez

    Last month, the Office of Foreign Assets Control announced a settlement with Cobham Holdings over shipments of goods to a Russian entity. The violations, apparently caused by deficient screening software, may signal heightened compliance expectations, say Roberto Gonzalez and Rachel Fiorill of Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP.

  • Opinion

    DOJ Speech May Leave SEP Implementers In Dire Straits

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    I suspect the true audience for the U.S. Department of Justice’s disavowal last week of a 2013 policy statement on standard-essential patents is not the courts but rather the U.S. International Trade Commission, whose discretion to pressure standard implementers to accept onerous licensing terms will be tested in the coming years, says University of Minnesota Law School professor Thomas Cotter.

  • The Romaine Health Advisory: Scope And Implications

    Leslie Krasny

    Days before Thanksgiving, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that consumers avoid eating romaine lettuce from any source. The broad scope of the advisory reflected the challenge of obtaining precise supply chain information, say Leslie Krasny and Nury Yoo of Keller and Heckman LLP.