International Trade

  • April 23, 2018

    Tile Shop Aims To Settle Investor Suits Over Supplier Link

    Directors of Tile Shop Holdings Inc. filed a proposed settlement in Delaware’s Chancery Court Monday, promising to overhaul internal controls in the hope of resolving two derivative lawsuits filed over the board’s conflicted relationship with a Chinese supplier that caused the company to sell lead-contaminated tile products.

  • April 23, 2018

    US Launches Probe Into Chinese Steel Wheel Imports

    The U.S. Department of Commerce is launching an investigation into complaints by Accuride Corp. and Maxion Wheels Akron LLC that a slew of Chinese companies are dumping steel wheels on American shores and receiving unfair subsidies, according to a Federal Register notice released Monday.

  • April 23, 2018

    DOJ Expects New Foreign Ally In Bribery Fight, Deputy Says

    Another country is soon likely to join the likes of Brazil, Sweden and others whose enforcement agencies have coordinated resolutions of foreign bribery cases with the U.S. Department of Justice, an official said on Monday.

  • April 23, 2018

    EU, Mexico Agree To Broader Trade Deal Nixing Tariffs

    Trade officials with the European Union and Mexico announced that they have struck a bilateral free trade agreement that would eliminate virtually all duty payments between the two economies and further open government contracts by the North American nation to European companies.

  • April 23, 2018

    Failed Fraud Doesn't Doom $4.9M Award In Steel Sale Row

    An English appeals court on Monday upheld the enforcement of a $4.9 million arbitration award issued to a Chinese metals supplier against a British company over an alleged breach of a steel contract, finding that although the manufacturer may have tried to forge shipping documents, it failed, and failed forgery is no fraud at all. 

  • April 23, 2018

    US Blasts China For 'Inadequate' Subsidy Notice

    The U.S. called out China in a World Trade Organization filing Friday for failing to give a complete picture of certain subsidy programs it provides to companies within the emerging industries, steel and fisheries sectors, as required by WTO rules.

  • April 23, 2018

    Treasury Ease Sanctions On Russian-Linked Aluminum Giant

    The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control on Monday partially walked back sanctions imposed earlier this month against United Co. RUSAL, the world’s second-largest aluminum producer, in response to Russia’s actions in Ukraine and Syria and interference in the 2016 presidential election.

  • April 20, 2018

    Vitamin C Importers Urge Less Int’l Deference At High Court

    Vitamin C importers told the U.S. Supreme Court in a brief ahead of oral arguments next week that domestic courts are not required to defer to a foreign government's interpretation of its own laws, in a closely watched price-fixing case set to include participation from both the U.S. and China over the vacating of a $147.8 million judgment.

  • April 20, 2018

    Navy Sec. Seeks Way To Keep Adversaries Out Of DOD Deals

    Navy Secretary Richard Spencer at a Senate panel hearing Thursday called on the U.S. Department of Defense to develop an algorithm to detect and prevent instances of adversaries accessing sensitive information through contracts, pointing to a close call involving Chinese telecommunication equipment company Huawei Technologies.

  • April 20, 2018

    New VAT Rates May Help China Retain Multinational Firms

    A seemingly small change to China’s value-added tax rates set to go into effect next month may not be enough to give China an edge over the U.S. in drawing new businesses, but it could encourage existing multinational businesses to stay put.

  • April 20, 2018

    EU Advances Trade Deals With Japan, Singapore

    The European Commission on Thursday presented to the European Council the separate trade and investment deals it hopes the European Union will strike with Japan and Singapore that would sweep the economies under united sets of trading rules.

  • April 20, 2018

    Chinese Carbon Firm Loses Comparative Country Fight

    The U.S. Court of International Trade on Thursday upheld the U.S. Department of Commerce's selection of Thailand as the comparative country for setting anti-dumping duty rates for certain activated carbon from China, but kicked back several of the department's specific determinations in the matter.

  • April 20, 2018

    Korean Steel Co. Challenges Anti-Dumping Findings At CIT

    A South Korean producer has launched a complaint before the U.S. Court of International Trade contesting the rate it was assigned in an anti-dumping duty review of Korean oil piping materials, arguing that one translation mistake in a financial statement did not warrant the court's decision to assign an adverse rate.

  • April 20, 2018

    UK Treasury Chief Presses For Global Dirty Money Crackdown

    Britain’s Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond called on international financial services and insurance regulators on Friday to impose tighter sanctions on North Korea to help put a stop to dirty money used to fund weapons of mass destruction.

  • April 19, 2018

    Senate Finance Leaders Want Tariff Exclusions Smoothed Out

    The U.S. Department of Commerce should improve the procedures that businesses must follow for securing a reprieve from the Trump administration’s sweeping tariffs on steel and aluminum to ensure that due process is followed, the heads of the Senate Finance Committee asserted on Thursday.

  • April 19, 2018

    Dems Want USTR To Press Mexican Labor Reforms In NAFTA

    Nearly 100 Democratic lawmakers urged the Trump administration late Wednesday to use its influence in the North American Free Trade Agreement negotiations to beat back pending Mexican legislation that they claim would hinder the effort to improve the trade deal’s labor provisions.

  • April 19, 2018

    McDonnell Can't Be Plopped Onto Guinean Law, 2nd Circ. Told

    Prosecutors have urged the Second Circuit to reject a former Guinean mining minister’s bid to undo a money-laundering conviction, arguing that the U.S. Supreme Court’s McDonnell decision interpreting U.S. bribery law doesn’t apply to foreign statutes.

  • April 19, 2018

    EU Investment Treaty Ruling May Extend Beyond Bloc

    A decision issued last month by Europe's top court concluding that an arbitration clause in a Dutch-Slovak investment treaty is incompatible with European Union law may also apply to agreements between the bloc or its member states and third countries, according to a Thursday report.

  • April 19, 2018

    White House Releases New Arms, Drone Export Policy

    The White House on Thursday unveiled a broad plan to overhaul U.S. arms export rules, meant to better align policy with national and economic security interests, make the export process more streamlined and predictable, and open up more drone exports.

  • April 19, 2018

    CIT Upholds Commerce's Chinese Steel Dumping Review

    The U.S. Department of Commerce provided substantial evidence to support its decision to use comparative data from Bulgaria for calculating whether Chinese companies dumped steel threaded rod in the United States, the U.S. Court of International Trade determined on Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Battery Supply Chain: A Unique Growth Opportunity

    Rebecca Campbell

    Battery materials and electric vehicles offer something unique to today’s commodity producers and investors: a sustainable growth story that is not just China-dependent. The exponential growth in demand is creating a scramble for resources not seen since the last great commodity supercycle, say attorneys with White & Case LLP.

  • Best Practices For Building A Better Meeting

    Nicholas Cheolas

    How can we improve meetings in the legal industry, which tends to evolve with the speed of a tranquilized water buffalo mired in quicksand? Breaking it down to three phases can yield significant benefits, says Nicholas Cheolas of Zelle LLP.

  • 5 Ways Law Firms Are Becoming More Like Hotels

    Bella Schiro

    One way law firms differentiate themselves from the competition to attract and retain top talent is through their real estate and workplace strategies. Taking a lead from the hospitality industry can help create a more inviting, welcoming and collaborative workspace environment, says Bella Schiro of Jones Lang LaSalle Inc.

  • A Setback For FCPA-Based Securities Class Actions

    Mauricio España

    The Southern District of New York's recent dismissal of a securities class action against Embraer provides hope that not every Foreign Corrupt Practices Act settlement will give rise to expensive private litigation, say attorneys with Dechert LLP.

  • Opinion

    Gorsuch's 1st Year Shows He Is A Conservative Activist

    Elliot Mincberg

    In his first year on the U.S. Supreme Court, Justice Neil Gorsuch has proven to be a narrow-minded elitist who consistently votes in favor of corporations and the powerful, acting to roll back protections for workers, consumers, LGBTQ individuals and other marginalized communities, says Elliot Mincberg of People for the American Way.

  • The Many Challenges Facing Venezuela Bribery Suit: Part 2

    Richard Cooper

    Resolution of the standing issues raised in the U.S. bribery suit brought by Venezuela’s state-owned oil company PDVSA may have implications not just for this case, but for whether PDVSA may be bound by the Venezuelan government to any future debt restructuring, say Richard Cooper and Boaz Morag of Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP.

  • The Many Challenges Facing Venezuela Bribery Suit: Part 1

    Richard Cooper

    The documents filed thus far in the U.S. bribery suit brought by Venezuela’s state-owned oil company PDVSA make clear that the standing issues in this case are complicated. The case also presents questions as to whether it will have implications for financial creditors of PDVSA and the republic, say Richard Cooper and Boaz Morag of Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP.

  • Opinion

    There Is Middle Ground For US Lawyers On AML Regimes

    Matthew O'Hara

    The American Bar Association continues to oppose legislation that would impose certain European Union and U.K. anti-money laundering requirements on U.S. lawyers. The ABA should further consider its approach to this issue as there is a viable middle ground that protects privileged communications and confidential information while advancing the interests of the legal profession, says Matthew O’Hara of Freeborn & Peters LLP.

  • Trump Tariffs May Violate Investment Treaty Protections

    Javier Rubinstein

    Foreign companies affected by the America First tariffs should consider the extent to which such tariffs may violate their rights under applicable investment treaties or free trade agreements, and thus may provide them with recourse in international arbitration for the harm they have suffered, say Javier Rubinstein and Lauren Friedman of Kirkland & Ellis LLP.

  • What Cos. Need To Know About China’s New Market Regulator

    Katherine Wang

    As part of a sweeping government restructuring plan announced last month, China is merging a range of government agencies into the new State Market Regulatory Administration. Multinational companies doing business in China must pay close attention to how functions within the newly consolidated agency will be organized, say attorneys with Ropes & Gray LLP.