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Massachusetts

  • September 18, 2018

    Boston Scientific Faces Chancery Suit For Ending $275M Deal

    Medical technology developer Channel Medsystems Inc. sued Boston Scientific late Monday in Delaware's Chancery Court, claiming an unjustified breach of a $275 million agreement to buy Channel and its potential breakthrough device for treating heavy menstrual bleeding.

  • September 18, 2018

    Harvard Eyes Affirmative Action Opponent Behind Bias Suit

    Harvard University said Tuesday its lawyers were considering calling a high-profile affirmative action opponent to testify “in a trial he himself orchestrated” that could ask a Boston federal jury whether the Ivy League school discriminates against Asian-American undergraduate applicants to raise up people of other races.

  • September 18, 2018

    Dunkin' Donuts Wants 'Fake Blueberry' Doughnut Suit Tossed

    Dunkin' Donuts on Monday asked an Illinois federal judge to toss a suit alleging that the chain misled customers about its artificially flavored blueberry doughnuts, saying the customer leading the suit can't prove he overpaid for his sweet treat.

  • September 18, 2018

    Mass. Utility Hit With $50M Suit After Deadly Gas Explosions

    Antiquated infrastructure and a lack of leak prevention and safety practices led to last week’s gas explosions in three communities north of Boston, killing one person and displacing thousands, according to a $50 million proposed class action filed Tuesday in Massachusetts state court seeking to hold the utility company responsible.

  • September 18, 2018

    Six Cos. Launch IPOs Totaling $465M Led By Biotech Firms

    Six companies set price ranges this week on initial public offerings estimated to raise $465 million combined, led by four biotechnology firms plus a medical device company and a Maryland bank, adding to a growing lineup of issuers expected to price IPOs in the coming days.

  • September 18, 2018

    Mass. Hospital Rips FCA Claims Med Students Not Supervised

    Massachusetts General Hospital argued Monday that a former anesthesiologist’s False Claims Act lawsuit citing specific bills fails to properly show that the renowned teaching hospital overbilled government health programs for time patients spent in the care of unsupervised doctors-in-training or waiting on overbooked surgery units.

  • September 18, 2018

    Sens. Want NLRB Member Off Case For Littler Mendelson Ties

    U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., told the National Labor Relations Board that member William Emanuel shouldn't participate in a case that could overturn an earlier board decision allowing workers to use their employers' email systems for union business, arguing that the former Littler Mendelson PC partner had a conflict of interest.

  • September 18, 2018

    Wynn Resorts Hit With $1B RICO Suit Over Mass. Casino

    Wynn Resorts Ltd. conspired to beat an East Boston racetrack for a Massachusetts Gaming Commission casino license through lies, threats, improper conversations with the agency and illegal campaign contributions, according to a multibillion-dollar Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act lawsuit filed in federal court.

  • September 18, 2018

    Smith & Nephew To Pay $10.5M To Settle Knee Implant IP Row

    Smith & Nephew Inc. will shell out $10.5 million to Conformis Inc. to resolve all pending patent disputes between the two medical equipment manufacturers, Conformis said Monday.

  • September 17, 2018

    CIA Can't Shake Suit Seeking Twitter Usage Docs

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Monday shot down the Central Intelligence Agency's bid to ax a Freedom of Information Act suit seeking documents about the agency's Twitter usage, finding that the limited scope of portions of the CIA's search and its decision to withhold information about certain individuals' identities were improper.

  • September 17, 2018

    Martha's Vineyard Golf Club Exempt From OT Pay, Judge Says

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Monday ruled that a tony Martha's Vineyard golf club that has welcomed such luminaries as President Barack Obama and NBA star Steph Curry doesn’t have to pay overtime to employees because it’s a seasonal, recreational establishment.

  • September 17, 2018

    Wagner Law Group Adds ERISA, Tax, Energy Pro As Partner

    The Wagner Law Group has expanded its practice with the addition of an ex-Mazars USA LLP Employee Retirement Income Security Act expert with years of experience under her belt, saying Monday she has come to the firm as a partner in Boston.

  • September 17, 2018

    Charter Pushes For Cable Rate-Control Relief In Mass., Hawaii

    An emerging threat from new online TV streaming competitors calls for freeing the cable business from rate caps in dozens of Massachusetts markets and a Hawaiian island, telecom giant Charter has argued in a new request to the Federal Communications Commission.

  • September 17, 2018

    Mass. To Enforce 'Cookie Nexus,' Revenue Dept. Says

    Massachusetts made it clear Monday that it will continue to enforce its “cookie nexus” regulation reaching back to October 2017, when the regulation was promulgated.

  • September 17, 2018

    Ex-UMass Student News Editor Must Face Defamation Suit

    The Massachusetts Appeals Court ruled Monday that a former employee at University of Massachusetts’ Boston campus can sue a onetime student news editor for defamation, saying that publishing police blotter activity does not enjoy press protections.

  • September 17, 2018

    Gleevec Buyers Say 1st Circ.'s Dismissal Misread Patent Law

    Buyers of the leukemia drug Gleevec urged a First Circuit panel on Friday to rehear its decision affirming the dismissal of a proposed class action accusing Novartis of using sham litigation to extend a monopoly over the medication, arguing the ruling went against “black-letter patent law.”

  • September 17, 2018

    Rejected Harvard Applicants Fight Student Trial Testimony

    Eight Harvard University students and alumni should not be allowed to testify or participate as parties in a landmark admissions suit against the Ivy League school, a group of rejected applicants and the anti-affirmative action plaintiff told a federal judge late Friday afternoon.

  • September 17, 2018

    TelexFree Admits Massive Telecom Scam, Securities Abuses

    The scam corporations behind one of the world's largest pyramid schemes, TelexFree Inc. and TelexFree LLC, admitted Monday to securities fraud that federal agents believe swindled more than 1 million people, a move signaling the end of criminal charges and a lawsuit that halted the massive scheme in its tracks in 2014.

  • September 17, 2018

    UNH Law Hit With $5.3M Due Process Suit By Ex-Student

    The University of New Hampshire School of Law was hit with a $5.3 million lawsuit on Friday in federal court by a former student from Massachusetts who claims the school denied him a chance to be heard on an alleged code of conduct violation, costing him admission to two other law schools.

  • September 14, 2018

    The Privacy Fight For Digital Data Warrants Is Just Starting

    Lower courts are already grappling with the U.S. Supreme Court's June ruling in Carpenter v. U.S. telling authorities to get a warrant for cellphone location data, which privacy lawyers say is just the tip of the iceberg as disputes loom about other types of digital data that can reveal intimate details about someone's life.

Expert Analysis

  • Calif.'s New Rules For Lawyers Move Closer To ABA Model

    Mark Loeterman

    The first comprehensive overhaul of California's Rules of Professional Conduct in nearly 30 years becomes operational on Nov. 1. Some of the new rules mirror the model language used by the American Bar Association, but many continue to reflect California’s unique approach to certain ethical questions, says Mark Loeterman of Signature Resolution LLC.

  • Know The Limits To Atty Public Statements During A Trial

    Matthew Giardina

    The balancing act between protecting attorneys’ speech rights and ensuring unbiased adjudications was highlighted recently in two cases — when Michael Cohen applied for a restraining order against Stephanie Clifford's attorney, and when Johnson & Johnson questioned whether a Missouri talc verdict was tainted by public statements from the plaintiffs' counsel, says Matthew Giardina of Manning Gross & Massenburg LLP.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Faegre Client Development Chief Melanie Green

    Melanie Green

    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Melanie Green, chief client development officer at Faegre Baker Daniels LLP.

  • Why State Marijuana-Impaired Driving Laws Need Reform

    Ian Stewart

    Because current state laws relating to marijuana-impaired driving lack an objective impairment standard, only those who clearly demonstrate impaired driving are likely to be prosecuted and convicted, says Ian Stewart of Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker LLP.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: Widener's Rod Smolla Talks Free Speech

    Rodney Smolla

    In this new series featuring law school luminaries, Widener University Delaware Law School dean Rodney Smolla discusses teaching philosophies, his interest in First Amendment law, and arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court in Virginia v. Black.

  • Opinion

    1st Circ. Eye Drop Decision Gets Preemption Right

    James Beck

    A Massachusetts federal court ruled last year in Gustavsen v. Alcon Laboratories that the plaintiffs’ attacks on the size of eye drops were a challenge to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's approved dose of that product. Last week, the First Circuit affirmed — proving that weak, lawyer-driven litigation can still produce good decisions on preemption, says James Beck of Reed Smith LLP.

  • Will High Court Resolve Circuit Split On Arbitration Issues?

    Cary Sullivan

    This fall, in New Prime v. Dominic Oliveira, the U.S. Supreme Court will be presented with two important questions related to the Federal Arbitration Act’s Section 1 exemption. The ruling could have major ramifications for the transportation industry, where arbitration provisions are often included in employment or independent contractor agreements, says Cary Sullivan of Jones Day.

  • New Pass-Through Deduction Will Pass Over Many Lawyers

    Evan Morgan

    A few weeks ago, the IRS proposed regulations related to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act's 20 percent deduction on qualified business income for pass-through entities. The guidance offers long-awaited clarity, but is mostly bad news for many law firms, says Evan Morgan of Kaufman Rossin PA.

  • How Reckless Judicial Impeachments Threaten Rule Of Law

    Jan van Zyl Smit

    Judicial impeachment fever seems to be spreading through the states, with West Virginia legislators recently voting to remove their state's entire Supreme Court, and lawmakers in Pennsylvania and North Carolina threatening the same. These actions are a serious threat to judicial independence, says Jan van Zyl Smit of the Bingham Centre for the Rule of Law.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Fogel Reviews 'Good Judgment'

    Judge Jeremy Fogel

    In this time of partisan conflict over judicial selection, a new book by Canadian jurist Robert J. Sharpe —​ "Good Judgment" — represents a refreshing, deeply thoughtful departure from binary arguments about how and why judges make decisions, says U.S. District Judge Jeremy Fogel, director of the Federal Judicial Center.