Massachusetts

  • November 25, 2020

    Mass. Top Court Takes Shape With Latest Pick Set For A Vote

    Massachusetts' reshaped top appeals court will come into sharper focus this week as Gov. Charlie Baker's third and final pending nominee to the Supreme Judicial Court appears for a hearing before the state's judicial nominations panel, which last week unanimously confirmed Justice Dalila Argaez Wendlandt.

  • November 25, 2020

    Law360 Names Practice Groups Of The Year

    Law360 congratulates the winners of its 2020 Practice Groups of the Year awards, which honor the law firms behind the litigation wins and major deals that resonated throughout the legal industry in the past year.

  • November 25, 2020

    The Firms That Dominated In 2020

    The eight law firms topping Law360's Firms of the Year managed to win 54 Practice Group of the Year awards among them, for guiding landmark deals, scoring victories in high-profile disputes and helping companies navigate uncharted legal seas made rough by the coronavirus pandemic.

  • November 25, 2020

    Trump Says DOJ Can Stop Enviro Project Settlements

    The Trump administration told a Massachusetts federal court that it had the discretion to reach settlements as it saw fit, pushing to end a suit by environmental advocates that said the U.S. Department of Justice's policy banning environmental improvement projects in enforcement settlements is unlawful.

  • November 25, 2020

    Goodwin Steers Mass Spectrometry Biz Eyeing $75M IPO

    Mass spectrometry company 908 Devices on Wednesday filed for an initial public offering guided by Goodwin Procter LLP that is preliminarily estimated to bring in about $75 million.

  • November 25, 2020

    Coronavirus Regulations: A State-By-State Week In Review

    Ahead of the long weekend, when Americans are most known for gathering and traveling, Thanksgiving-minded governors laid down more restrictions as COVID-19 cases continued surging over the past week.

  • November 25, 2020

    Bar Argues For In-Person Hearing Rights At Mass. Top Court

    The Boston Bar Association has urged the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court to hold an upcoming hearing in a criminal case in-person, arguing virtual hearings can cause unconstitutional disparities for low-income communities and people of color.

  • November 25, 2020

    'Varsity Blues' Judge Tells Attys To Prep For Trial Or Withdraw

    Lawyers for parents in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions case need to be ready for a trial with adequate precautions or else withdraw from the case, a federal judge in Massachusetts said Wednesday, responding sharply to four defendants' request for a seven-month delay amid the coronavirus pandemic.

  • November 25, 2020

    PE Firm Advent International Sues GE Over Failed $3B Deal

    A private equity firm sued in London over its $3 billion purchase of a General Electric power unit has hit back with its own suit, accusing the conglomerate of making key omissions in financial statements used to evaluate the final price of the deal.  

  • November 24, 2020

    Mass. Panel Won't Revive Care Attendant's Wage Suit

    A Massachusetts personal care attendant's wage and hour lawsuit against a state agency and two disability assistance organizations can't proceed because she is employed by her patient, not those entities, the Massachusetts Appeals Court ruled Tuesday.

  • November 24, 2020

    Boston Teamsters Wrongly Backed Strike, NLRB Judge Says

    A Boston-area Teamsters union local violated federal labor law by suggesting members not cross another union's picket outside two DHL facilities, a National Labor Relations Board judge said, calling the refusal to cross it an illegal secondary strike.

  • November 24, 2020

    States, Cities Seek Demise Of Trump's Narrowed Water Rule

    A group of states on Monday asked a federal judge to scrap the Trump administration's rule narrowing the scope of the Clean Water Act's jurisdiction, saying the government failed to study how excluding many previously protected waters would harm water quality and step on states' rights.

  • November 24, 2020

    Goodwin Offering Special Bonuses For Work During Pandemic

    Goodwin Procter LLP will pay its nonpartner lawyers in the U.S. a one-time bonus — up to $40,000 — in December for their work throughout the year and the pandemic, which will be in addition to their annual bonuses in January, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • November 24, 2020

    Mass. AG Says Gym Chain Ignored Cancellations Amid Virus

    The bankrupt parent company of Boston Sports Clubs has illegally charged fees for unwanted memberships and failed to honor cancellation requests during the coronavirus pandemic, Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey alleged in a suit Tuesday.

  • November 24, 2020

    EEOC Nabs $310K Recovery In Race, Sex Harassment Suits

    Tegra Medical LLC agreed to pay $240,000 to end a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit claiming the company sat idly by as female workers faced lewd comments and unwanted advances, while the operator of Smashburger reached a $70,000 deal to wrap up a racial harassment case, the EEOC said Tuesday.

  • November 24, 2020

    Purdue Pleads Guilty In NJ To Criminal Opioid Conspiracy

    OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma LP's top officer entered guilty pleas Tuesday on behalf of the company to a three-count felony information detailing Purdue's long conspiracy to defeat federal opioid control programs and anti-kickback statutes, part of a wider $8.3 billion criminal and civil settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • November 24, 2020

    Home Depot To Pay $17.5M To States Over 2014 Data Breach

    Home Depot Inc. has agreed to pay $17.5 million and improve its data security to resolve a multistate investigation into a 2014 breach that exposed the credit card information of 40 million of its customers nationwide.

  • November 24, 2020

    Uber's Employee Status Arguments 'Pure Fiction,' Drivers Say

    Labor groups representing over 50,000 Uber drivers urged the First Circuit on Monday to force the ride-hailing company to recognize them as employees and grant them sick leave during the pandemic, dismissing as "pure fiction" the company's arguments that the drivers are fee-paying customers of its matchmaking service. 

  • November 23, 2020

    Demoulas Strikes $17.5M Deal In 'Abysmal' 401(k) Plan Suit

    DeMoulas Super Markets Inc. agreed to cough up $17.5 million to end a proposed class action accusing the Massachusetts-based grocery chain of giving thousands of workers just one "abysmal" choice for investing their retirement savings.

  • November 23, 2020

    Teva's Bid To Duck MDL Trials Slammed As 'Fool's Errand'

    A group of drug buyers and states asked a Pennsylvania federal judge Friday to reject Teva Pharmaceutical's bid to scrap a bellwether trial in multidistrict litigation over civil price-fixing claims to await the outcome of related criminal charges, calling the drugmaker's efforts to keep witnesses from overlapping a "fool's errand."

  • November 23, 2020

    'Varsity Blues' Judge Says Admissions Slots Not Property

    College admissions slots at the center of the "Varsity Blues" case don't qualify as property for federal wire fraud charges, a Massachusetts federal judge said Monday, applying the U.S. Supreme Court's May decision overturning the Bridgegate convictions to the university officials indicted in the high-profile admissions and testing scandal.

  • November 23, 2020

    What's Behind Unions' Higher Ed Organizing Boom

    Legal changes and job security concerns have ignited an organizing explosion among non-tenure college professors and graduate student workers, swelling organized labor’s ranks in higher education by tens of thousands over the last several years, new research shows. Here Law360 explores the dynamics of this red-hot sector.

  • November 23, 2020

    1st Circ. Backs Convictions For Pharma Inside Traders

    The First Circuit on Friday upheld the insider trading convictions of two biotech employees, saying the pieces of evidence at trial "fit neatly together" to show the friends profited by trading stock based on nonpublic information.

  • November 20, 2020

    DC Circ. Backs NLRB On Tire Co.'s Failure To Bargain

    A Massachusetts tire business violated federal labor law when it didn't notify or bargain with a union before contracting out bargaining unit work and implementing and terminating a bonus program, the D.C. Circuit ruled Friday, upholding a National Labor Relations Board decision from last year.

  • November 20, 2020

    DOL Hit With Suit To Let Ex-Felon Serve As Union Official

    The U.S. Department of Labor should let a Massachusetts man convicted of drug trafficking serve as a union official despite a labor law prohibiting former felons from doing so for 13 years, the man said in a petition in federal court in that state.

Expert Analysis

  • Ethics Reminders As Employees Move To Or From Gov't

    Author Photo

    Many organizations are making plans for executives to go into government jobs, or for government officials to join a private sector team, but they must understand the many ethics rules that can put a damper on just how valuable the former employee or new hire can be, say Scott Thomas and Jennifer Carrier at Blank Rome.

  • Surveying Drug Pricing Reform: The Latest State Activity

    Author Photo

    Attorneys at Ropes & Gray explore four types of high-impact drug pricing initiatives at the state level — pricing transparency, pharmacy benefit manager controls, drug importation and value-based arrangements — examining how the current wave of reforms may affect drug companies' business operations.

  • A Key To Helping Clients Make Better Decisions During Crisis

    Author Photo

    As the pandemic brings a variety of legal stresses for businesses, lawyers must understand the emotional dynamic of a crisis and the particular energy it produces to effectively fulfill their role as advisers, say Meredith Parfet and Aaron Solomon at Ravenyard Group.

  • Where Data Privacy And CFPB Are Headed Under Biden

    Author Photo

    Data privacy is likely to be a key area of legislative and enforcement focus for President-elect Joe Biden, and consumer financial protection is expected to be an immediate priority due to the economic impact of the pandemic, with the most drastic shift likely to occur at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • A Wage And Hour Compliance Reminder For Nonprofit Boards

    Author Photo

    As many nonprofits face budget shortfalls due to the pandemic, the one-year anniversary of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court’s decision in Lynch v. Crawford reminds board-level volunteers that they could be found personally liable for wage violations, despite qualified immunity provided by federal and state law, say attorneys at Casner & Edwards.

  • 6 Best Practices For Banks Serving The Marijuana Industry

    Author Photo

    As more states legalize marijuana, financial institutions with marijuana-related business customers should implement robust and nuanced compliance programs, and those that do not want to serve the industry should have policies in place for determining whether existing customers are engaged in marijuana-related activities, say attorneys at Venable.

  • Ethics Considerations For Law Firms Implementing AI

    Author Photo

    Richard Finkelman and Yihua Astle at Berkeley Research Group discuss the ethical and bias concerns law firms must address when implementing artificial intelligence-powered applications for recruiting, conflict identification and client counseling.

  • Picking The Right Location And Tools For Virtual Courtrooms

    Author Photo

    Attorneys should consider the pros and cons of participating in virtual court proceedings from home versus their law firm offices, and whether they have the right audio, video and team communication tools for their particular setup, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Insurance Considerations For Schools Harmed By COVID-19

    Author Photo

    Schools facing lawsuits associated with both shutting down and reopening amid the COVID-19 pandemic may be able to find relief through their consumer general liability and educators legal liability insurance policies, says Michael Rush at Gilbert.

  • Beware Atty Ethics Rules When Reporting COVID-19 Fraud

    Author Photo

    Attorneys considering blowing the whistle on False Claims Act violations by recipients of COVID-19 relief may face a number of ethical constraints on their ability to disclose client information and file qui tam actions, say Breon Peace and Jennifer Kennedy Park at Cleary.

  • Looking For Judicial Activists? Check The Footnotes

    Author Photo

    U.S. Supreme Court nominees typically face intense questioning over potential judicial activism, but a better way to gauge judges' activist tendencies may be to look at the footnotes in their opinions, say Christopher Collier at Hawkins Parnell and Michael Arndt at Rohan Law.

  • Best Practices For Legal Technology Adoption

    Author Photo

    The pandemic has accelerated the need to improve the practice of law through technology, but law firms and in-house legal departments must first ensure they have employee buy-in and well-defined processes for new digital tools, say Dan Broderick at BlackBoiler and Daryl Shetterly at Orrick.

  • The Pandemic's Long-Term Impact On Law Firm Operations

    Author Photo

    Brian Burlant at Major Lindsey looks at how pandemic-era remote work has changed the way law firms operate — from shifts in secretarial functions to associate professional development — and explains why some alterations may be here to stay.

  • Opinion

    Lack Of Access To Remote Court Proceedings Is Inexcusable

    Author Photo

    Blanket rules that bar recording or dissemination of remote public court proceedings impede presumptive common law and First Amendment right of access, greatly expand courts' powers over nonparties, and likely run afoul of U.S. Supreme Court precedent, says Matthew Schafer at ViacomCBS.

  • Opinion

    Why Attacks On Trump's Election Lawyers Are Problematic

    Author Photo

    The vilification of Jones Day and Porter Wright for their involvement in President Donald Trump's election lawsuits is an attack on lawyers' duty to advocate for their clients' causes fearlessly and zealously within the bounds of the law, says Pierce O'Donnell at Greenberg Glusker.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!