Employment

  • October 22, 2021

    Princeton Lab Hit With Whistleblower Suit Over Project Safety

    Two welding inspectors hit a Princeton University science laboratory and other entities with a whistleblower lawsuit in New Jersey state court Friday, alleging they were fired after raising safety concerns about the manufacturing process and COVID-19 protocol connected to a nuclear fusion project.

  • October 22, 2021

    MedMen CFO Quit After Finding Possible Crimes, Jury Told

    The ex-chief financial officer of cannabis giant MedMen told a Los Angeles jury considering his breach of employment contract and retaliation claims on Friday that he had no choice but to resign after discovering potential illegal transportation of marijuana and stock market manipulation.

  • October 22, 2021

    Activision Can't Get Suit Paused Over Ethics Violations Claims

    A Los Angeles County judge refused Friday to stay California's suit accusing Activision Blizzard Inc. of widespread sexism and harassment, rejecting the game maker's request for time to look into recent allegations that attorneys for the state's Department of Fair Employment and Housing violated ethics rules.

  • October 22, 2021

    LA Jury Awards $49.6M To State Trooper Injured In Crash

    A Los Angeles jury has awarded $49.6 million in damages to a California Highway Patrol officer who was permanently injured when a driver rear-ended his motorcycle while he was conducting a traffic stop on the freeway.

  • October 22, 2021

    Think Tank Sues Ex-Employee, Counsel Over Retaliation Suit

    A Philadelphia think tank has sued a former employee and law firm Pond Lehocky in Pennsylvania state court, saying the employee should have dropped her federal lawsuit against it when it became apparent that an anonymous, disparaging phone call to her potential employer came from her own boyfriend.

  • October 22, 2021

    CoreCivic Still Can't Nix Suit Over Body Cavity Search

    Private prison company CoreCivic has failed to end a suit over allegations that one of its employees subjected a correctional officer to a warrantless and dehumanizing body cavity search, with a Georgia federal court saying Friday newly filed documents had satisfied an earlier defect.

  • October 22, 2021

    BAE Systems, NSC Tech To Pay $2.75M In Meal Break Suit

    Around 1,600 NSC Technologies workers assigned to work at BAE Systems San Diego Ship Repair​​ urged a California federal judge to preliminarily approve a $2.75 million settlement to resolve a proposed class and collective action alleging the companies failed to provide breaks and pay their full wages owed.

  • October 22, 2021

    Employment Authority: Netflix Walkout & 'Striketober'

    Law360 Employment Authority covers the biggest employment cases and trends. Catch up this week with takeaways from a walkout of Netflix employees after the streaming service's release of a Dave Chappelle comedy special that critics have labeled transphobic, what a new version of the Labor Department's joint-employer rule might look like, and how worker dissatisfaction and a tight labor market have led to a nationwide wave of strikes.

  • October 22, 2021

    NJ Judge Cites Ex-Firm Connection In Firing Suit Recusal

    A New Jersey federal judge said he would recuse himself from a wrongful termination suit against Bayonne and its former business administrator, citing the need to "avoid the appearance of impartiality" since he worked with the ex-city official at the law firm now known as Chasan Lamparello Mallon & Cappuzzo PC.

  • October 22, 2021

    NFL To Stop Concussion Race-Norming In Unsealed Deal

    The NFL has formally agreed to stop the controversial use of race-based norms in cognitive testing for payouts from the uncapped concussion settlement and Black players will have an opportunity to have their claims reviewed, though it could be weeks before the deal is finalized.

  • October 22, 2021

    Ga. Judge Can't Extend Noncompete, Appeals Court Says

    A trial court's extension of a contractual noncompete provision was improper, the Georgia Court of Appeals said Thursday, reversing the trial court's indefinite ban on the operators of a towing business from competing with the company they sold to.

  • October 22, 2021

    Grocer Hits Pension Fund With Suit Over Arbitration Award

    A grocery retailer asked an Illinois federal court to vacate an arbitrator's ruling that approved a union pension fund's calculation of its withdrawal liability, saying the fund improperly calculated the company's payment schedule because it included the contribution history of several stores that were sold.

  • October 22, 2021

    Chicago Workers Sue Governor, City Over Vaccine Mandates

    A group of Chicago employees have filed a lawsuit against the city and Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker asking an Illinois federal court to strike down what they claim are unconstitutional orders requiring them to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

  • October 22, 2021

    Insurer, Pa. Church End $1.2M Employee Theft Coverage Row

    A Pittsburgh church, its child education program and their insurer agreed Friday to end litigation over whether the insurer must provide more coverage related to a former church employee's $1.2 million embezzlement.

  • October 22, 2021

    Mass. Health System Fired Exec For FCA Concerns, Suit Says

    A western Massachusetts hospital system that overbilled Medicare by $5 million for hyperbaric oxygen therapy fired its brand-new chief financial officer for voicing alarm about the potential for more widespread False Claims Act lawbreaking, according to a federal suit filed Friday.

  • October 22, 2021

    Employees Say Navistar Failed To Prevent Data Breach

    Truck and diesel engine maker Navistar Inc. failed to properly protect the personal information of thousands of its current and former employees from a data breach and waited too long to tell them about it, according to a proposed class action filed Thursday.

  • October 22, 2021

    Insurer Says Exclusions Apply To Pharma Co.'s BIPA Suit

    Atlantic Specialty Insurance Co. told an Illinois federal court it shouldn't have to defend a pharmaceutical returns company accused of violating the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act with its fingerprint timekeeping system, citing several policy exclusions.

  • October 22, 2021

    GAO Backs New Biz's 'Unacceptable' Work History Rating

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office backed the U.S. Department of Labor's decision to award a $43 million construction contract to an experienced Mississippi contractor, rejecting a newly formed company's arguments that it was wrongly faulted for its inexperience.

  • October 21, 2021

    Unvaxxed Players, Coaches Have Uphill Legal Fights Ahead

    Professional sports leagues are struggling with how to handle players and coaches who refuse to get COVID-19 vaccinations despite local and state mandates, but experts say leagues and teams that impose discipline are unlikely to face serious blowback as courts appear sympathetic to employers' plight.

  • October 21, 2021

    Ex-Ventilator Exec Must Face Poaching Suit, 1st Circ. Told

    Respiratory device maker Vapotherm Inc. has told the First Circuit that a New Hampshire federal judge wrongly found that a lack of jurisdiction kept the company from suing a former executive whose departure allegedly hindered its ability to make ventilators during the pandemic.

  • October 21, 2021

    NBA Announcer Fired For 'All Lives Matter' Tweet Sues Station

    Longtime former Sacramento Kings announcer Grant Napear sued an affiliate of CBS Sports Radio in California federal court Thursday alleging the station wrongly fired him for tweeting "All lives matter" during racial justice protests last summer.

  • October 21, 2021

    Feds Oppose Service Members' Anonymity In Vaccine Suit

    The federal government has urged a Florida federal court to deny a request from 16 service members to proceed anonymously in their case seeking to overturn the U.S.Department of Defense's COVID-19 vaccine mandate and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's approval of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, saying they have not provided valid justification.

  • October 21, 2021

    Texas AG Must Face Whistleblower Suit, Appeals Court Rules

    An Austin appellate court panel Thursday ruled Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton must face whistleblower claims launched by former top aides who allege they were fired for reporting abuses of power, rejecting Paxton's claim he is immune from the Texas Whistleblower Act.

  • October 21, 2021

    Judge Lifts Ban On Ex-Bank Worker In Trade Secret Dispute

    A California federal judge has undone a preliminary injunction barring a former East West Bank employee from using the bank's purported trade secrets, saying he would not have issued it in the first place if he knew about arbitration pacts the ex-worker signed.

  • October 21, 2021

    Jackson Lewis Opens Office in Riverside, Calif.

    Jackson Lewis PC has opened shop in Riverside, California to further tap into the region's busy market for litigation services, the national employment law firm announced Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • DOL Proposal Signals Relaxed Rules For ESG Investing

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of Labor’s recently proposed rule on how retirement plans can make investment decisions that consider environmental, social and governance factors significantly revises regulations adopted at the end of the Trump administration, paving the way for plan fiduciaries to more easily consider ESG factors, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • What SEC's Growing Whistleblower Incentives Mean For Cos.

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission recently surpassed $1 billion in total awards made to more than 200 individual whistleblowers — two important milestones that reflect the commission’s embrace of whistleblower tips as a source of market information on corporate wrongdoing, and highlight the need for companies to reevaluate their internal reporting frameworks, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • ESG Disclosure Mandate Faces Hurdles Regardless Of Path

    Author Photo

    While the U.S. Senate is unlikely to sign onto the Corporate Governance Improvement and Investor Protection Act, which would require companies to make more comprehensive environmental, social and governance disclosures, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission may attempt ESG disclosure rulemaking without congressional approval — but it won't be easy, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Financial Planning Tips For Retiring Law Firm Partners

    Author Photo

    As the pandemic accelerates retirement plans for many, Michael Delgass at Wealthspire Advisors outlines some financial considerations unique to law firm partners, including the need for adequate liquidity whether they have capital accounts or pension plans.

  • Preparing Remote Deposition Defenses For Corporate Entities

    Author Photo

    As remote depositions will remain common for the foreseeable future, attorneys defending a deposition notice or subpoena to a corporation should implement certain strategies to mitigate unique challenges, such as less planning time and increased difficulty of establishing rapport with witnesses, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • OSHA Virus Citation Highlights Key Compliance Challenges

    Author Photo

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration's recent citation to Fred Loya Insurance Agency for failing to report an employee’s COVID-19-related death shows the compliance hurdles employers face in determining if an exposure is work-related and when a death or inpatient hospitalization must be reported, says Patrick Bickford at Ausley McMullen.

  • Perspectives

    Why Law Schools Should Require Justice Reform Curriculum

    Author Photo

    Criminal defense attorney Donna Mulvihill Fehrmann argues that law schools have an obligation to address widespread racial and economic disparities in the U.S. legal system by mandating first-year coursework on criminal justice reform that educates on prosecutorial misconduct, wrongful convictions, defense 101 and more.

  • Extension Of The HSR Waiting Period Increases Acquirer Risk

    Author Photo

    Attorneys at K&L Gates look at the Federal Trade Commission's recent extension of the merger-review waiting period under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Act, and its effect on pending transactions, broader public policy and the Biden-era M&A market.

  • Opinion

    Copyright Law's Employment Test Is Frighteningly Outdated

    Author Photo

    In Horror Inc. v. Miller, the Second Circuit's recent analysis of whether the defendant was an employee or an independent contractor, and thus able to terminate his copyright, illustrates why copyright employment principles need to be updated in view of the post-COVID-19 work context, says Matthew Fagan at Kacvinsky Daisak.

  • Anti-Retaliation Refresher Following Facebook Whistleblower

    Author Photo

    A former Facebook employee’s recent sharing of internal documents with government agencies and the press reminds that whistleblowers are shielded by strong anti-retaliation protections — with certain limitations, depending on the type and scope of material taken and the parties that receive it, says Alia Al-Khatib at Katz Marshall.

  • Girardi Scandal Provides Important Ethics Lessons

    Author Photo

    The litigation and media maelstrom following allegations that famed plaintiffs attorney Thomas Girardi and his law firm misappropriated clients' funds provides myriad ethics and professional responsibility lessons for practitioners, especially with regard to misconduct reporting and liability insurance, says Elizabeth Tuttle Newman at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: Jabil GC Talks Compliance Preparation

    Author Photo

    Tried-and-true compliance lessons from recent decades can be applied to companies’ environmental, social and governance efforts, especially with regard to employee training and consistent application of policies — two factors that can create a foundation for ESG criteria to flourish, says Robert Katz at Jabil.

  • Corporate Boards' Role In Workplace Vaccine Mandates

    Author Photo

    Company boards may have a role to play in workplace COVID-19 vaccination mandates, given their duty to manage risks and the growing recognition of employees’ importance to the corporate mission — and effective oversight is key to ensuring a vaccine program doesn't introduce new issues, says Jen Rubin at Mintz.

  • 3 Ways CLOs Can Drive ESG Efforts

    Author Photo

    Chief legal officers are specially trained to see the legal industry's flaws, and they can leverage that perspective to push their companies toward effective environmental, social and governance engagement, says Mark Chandler at Stanford Law School.

  • Opinion

    Why Congress Should Pass Whistleblower Protection Law

    Author Photo

    It’s crucial that lawmakers enact the Whistleblower Protection Reform Act — which remedies the Dodd-Frank Act’s weak safeguards for those who report federal securities law violations — to ensure courageous tipsters continue to step forward when they spot wrongdoing, say Jason Zuckerman and Matthew Stock at Zuckerman Law.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!