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Business of Law

  • May 24, 2019

    Law360's Pro Say: The Freewheelin' John Roberts

    Have you ever wondered what U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts thinks about amicus briefs? What about his penchant for including Bob Dylan lyrics in his opinions? This week the Pro Say team went to Washington, D.C., for the Burton Awards, which recognize excellence in the law, and we share with you highlights of Justice Roberts' remarks, along with interviews with Burton honorees including Second Circuit Chief Judge Robert Katzmann, Oracle general counsel Dorian Daley and 3M general counsel Ivan Fong.

  • May 24, 2019

    Target In Ex-BigLaw Atty's Defamation Suit Wants Case Moved

    The former Equinox employee accused of smearing an ex-Hughes Hubbard partner has argued that the defamation suit filed against him in New York state court in Manhattan belongs in Brooklyn, where there are multiple cases related to purported misconduct at the gym already pending.

  • May 24, 2019

    Meet The Attorneys Facing Off In The Oklahoma Opioid Trial

    A landmark trial over the pharmaceutical industry's responsibility for the opioid crisis is about to get underway in Oklahoma, and it will give some of the Sooner State's sharpest legal minds a chance to showcase their skills by either opposing or working with BigLaw partners in front of a national audience.

  • May 24, 2019

    Virus Sends Philly Attys Back To Pre-Digital Dark Ages

    A virus that has knocked computer systems offline in Pennsylvania’s busiest court system over the past week is sowing confusion in judicial proceedings and forcing attorneys in the City of Brotherly Love to hearken back to the days before e-filing.

  • May 24, 2019

    Women Fight To Stay Anonymous In Jones Day Sex Bias Suit

    Four anonymous former Jones Day associates involved in a proposed class action accusing the firm of rampant bias against women are trying to turn the legal giant’s secrecy against it, citing the firm's success sealing a different discrimination suit as support for their bid to keep withhholding their names. 

  • May 24, 2019

    Robinson Bradshaw Calls Atty Claims In Bias Suit ‘Outlandish’

    Robinson Bradshaw & Hinson PA fired back Thursday against a black female attorney's court filing accusing the law firm of using racial stereotypes in its efforts to escape her bias suit against it, saying the attorney "caustically embellishes the most outlandish allegations of her complaint."

  • May 24, 2019

    GC Cheat Sheet: The Hottest Corporate News Of The Week

    In-house counsel in the U.S. saw an average salary bump of 4.4% in 2018 compared to 2017, ransomware attacks targeting bigger companies have surged this year, and a task force said legal employers should credit attorneys for their diversity efforts. These are some of the stories in corporate legal news you may have missed in the past week.​

  • May 24, 2019

    In-House Attorneys Reflect On A Year With GDPR

    By the time the Europeon Union's sweeping data protections took effect last year, in-house attorneys were already in the thick of trying to mitigate the risk for companies. Now, lawyers from heavyweights like Uber, Intel and Honeywell are sharing lessons from the past 365 days and their expectations for the future.

  • May 24, 2019

    3 Ways Law Firms Can Fight Back Against Bullying

    Whether it’s an attorney screaming at underlings, hurling insults at colleagues or cracking cruel jokes, bullying at law firms is exceedingly common, according to a newly released survey. But firms can take action to combat such behavior and create workplaces centered around respect. Here’s how.

  • May 23, 2019

    IP Firm Hits Back At Colo. Firm's Claims In 'Bold' Name Row

    An intellectual property firm has asked a Colorado federal court to throw out a counterclaim filed by a Denver-based firm in a trademark dispute over the use of the word "bold" in the firms' names.

  • May 23, 2019

    In-House Counsel Salaries Up 4.4% In 2018, Study Says

    In-house counsel in the U.S. saw an average salary bump of 4.4% last year compared to 2017, contributing to "unprecedented rates of compensation satisfaction," according to a study released on Thursday.

  • May 23, 2019

    Fla. High Court Adopts Daubert Standard For Evidence

    The Florida Supreme Court, with its new conservative majority, did an about-face Thursday and adopted stricter federal standards for the admittance of expert testimony, incorporating a 2013 law requiring the stricter standard one year after rejecting it over concerns it would undermine the right to a jury trial and inhibit access to the courts.

  • May 23, 2019

    DLA Piper Appoints IP Litigator As Next US Chair

    DLA Piper announced Thursday that it has selected the current co-chair of its intellectual property and technology practice to serve a four-year term as the firm's chair in the United States.

  • May 23, 2019

    Nashville Atty, Son Of Bass Berry & Sims Founder, Dies At 108

    A 108-year-old attorney who began practicing law during Franklin D. Roosevelt’s first administration and who continued to work in Bass Berry & Sims’ offices until recent months has died.

  • May 23, 2019

    Mass. Judge's Atty Blasts Deal-Offer Leak In ICE Arrest Case

    The attorney for a Massachusetts state court judge charged with allowing an unauthorized immigrant to escape U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement criticized the federal government Thursday for allegedly leaking that the judge turned down a deal that could have spared her criminal charges.

  • May 23, 2019

    Law360's Weekly Verdict: Legal Lions & Lambs

    WilmerHale nabbed this week’s top legal lion honor with a U.S. Supreme Court win in a trademark case for a sports apparel retailer, while Norton Rose Fulbright and Keker Van Nest & Peters were among the week’s legal lambs as a result of a crushing antitrust defeat in federal court for client Qualcomm.

  • May 23, 2019

    Craig Tried To Bar Skadden Attys' Testimony, Opinion Shows

    In the months leading up to his indictment, Gregory Craig, the ex-Skadden attorney charged with lying to federal authorities, sparred with both his former firm and prosecutors as he unsuccessfully sought to bar two onetime partners from testifying before a grand jury.

  • May 23, 2019

    Ex-Knobbe Martens, Heim Payne Partners Launch IP Boutique

    In the seven years since Congress passed its landmark patent law creating inter partes reviews, some larger litigation firms have struggled to fit their models to the new speedier format. But two veteran patent litigators, formerly with Knobbe Martens and Heim Payne & Chorush LLP, saw that challenge as an opportunity to launch a different kind of intellectual property firm Thursday.

  • May 22, 2019

    Dems Object To 9th Circ. Pick Who Doesn't Live In Calif.

    Senate Democrats fumed in a hearing Wednesday over President Donald Trump naming a Washington, D.C., attorney who has California ties but hasn't lived in the state for years to the Ninth Circuit, saying the move underscores the abandonment of courtesy to home state senators in judicial nominations.

  • May 22, 2019

    9th Circ. Nominee Breaks With Pack, Endorses Brown Ruling

    A White House pick for the Ninth Circuit on Wednesday broke from the script repeatedly used by many of President Donald Trump's court nominees and endorsed the Supreme Court's Brown v. Board of Education decision, telling the Senate Judiciary Committee he can discuss the ruling because it doesn't face judicial review.

  • May 22, 2019

    Avenatti Charged With Stealing Stormy Daniels' Book Money

    Michael Avenatti's legal problems continued to pile up Wednesday, with new federal charges in New York alleging he stole money from a book deal signed by his most famous ex-client, porn actress Stormy Daniels.

  • May 22, 2019

    Does 3rd-Party Funding Belong In Investment Arbitration?

    Nations and other stakeholders have been struggling to strike a balance in regulating the widespread use of third-party funding in investment arbitration amid criticism that it encourages frivolous claims and causes disproportionate funding within the investor-state dispute settlement regime.

  • May 22, 2019

    Walmart Hires International Compliance Chief From Oil Sector

    Walmart is continuing its legal hiring spree with the announcement Wednesday that a former federal prosecutor who spent the last seven years leading ethics and compliance programs at oil service providers will manage compliance at Walmart's 6,000 locations outside the United States.

  • May 22, 2019

    Senate Confirms Cooper Partner Who Disparaged Gay Judge

    The Senate confirmed four more of President Donald Trump's judicial nominees Wednesday, including a Cooper & Kirk partner who previously defended California's same-sex marriage ban by making disparaging comments about the sexuality of the judge who presided over the case.

  • May 22, 2019

    Large Firms Drive Spike In Associate Starting Salaries

    The median starting salary in the legal industry shot up nearly 15% between 2017 and 2019, with some of the most significant pay hikes happening at the largest firms, according to a report released on Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Real-Life Lessons For Lawyers From 'Game Of Thrones'

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    What lessons can the various hands, maesters, council members and other advisers in "Game of Thrones" impart to real-life lawyers? Quite a few, if we assume that the Model Rules of Professional Conduct were adopted by the Seven Kingdoms, says Edward Reich of Dentons.

  • 5 Tips To Help Your Summer Associates Succeed

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    There are a number of ways that attorneys can ensure their summer associates successfully manage critical writing assignments and new types of professional interactions, says Julie Schrager of Schiff Hardin.

  • Keys To Communicating A Law Firm's Mission

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    Today’s law firm leaders are pretty good at developing a strategic vision for the enterprise, but there is often a disconnect between that road map and the marketing department’s rank and file, leading to a deliverable that does little to differentiate the firm, says José Cunningham, a legal industry consultant.

  • Lawyers' Digital Assistants Raise Ethics, Privacy Concerns

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    As voice-activated digital assistants become more popular, attorneys who use such technology in their offices must keep abreast of evolving standards of reasonable care in protecting confidential client information, say Brenda Dorsett of the New York State Bar Association Professional Ethics Committee and Barry Temkin of Mound Cotton.

  • Opinion

    How Lawyers Can Help Save The Planet

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    Over a dozen major law firms have joined our effort to overcome the legal obstacles that states, cities and businesses face in fighting climate change. But more lawyers are needed, say Michael Gerrard of Columbia Law School and John Dernbach of Widener University Commonwealth Law School.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

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    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

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    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wood Reviews 'The Making Of A Justice'

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    Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens' new book, "The Making of a Justice," is required reading for anyone interested in 20th and 21st century America, says Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood.

  • Getting Out Of Legal Project Management Debt

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    If a client does not demand the application of project management techniques at the start of a matter, or a law firm does not routinely apply them, it is highly likely that additional, avoidable work — legal project management debt — will materialize throughout the matter, says Anthony Widdop of Shearman & Sterling.

  • 6 Ways To Keep Your Jury From Zoning Out

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    Science suggests that at least some jurors pay attention to less than 65% of the evidence during a trial due to "task-unrelated thoughts," but there are steps attorneys can take to present information in a more engaging, cognition-friendly fashion, say Dennis Stolle and Dennis Devine of Barnes & Thornburg.

  • 5 Myths In Legal Crisis Communications

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    Having worked at a boutique law firm, a crisis communications agency and in BigLaw, I have identified a number of common misconceptions across these disparate business models when it comes to crisis and litigation communications, says Robert Gemmill of Hogan Lovells.

  • An Overview Of The Debate Over Litigation Finance Disclosure

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    In light of a New York federal court's recent decision in Benitez v. Lopez, which joins a growing body of case law denying forced disclosure of commercial litigation finance, Stephanie Spangler of Norris McLaughlin and Dai Wai Chin Feman of Parabellum Capital break down the arguments commonly raised for and against disclosure.

  • How To Identify And Deal With Narcissists In Law

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    Given that a large swath of the legal profession may display some narcissistic tendencies, it is important for lawyers to know how to address the narcissist in the room — and it may be you, says Jennifer Gibbs of Zelle.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Cleary Chief Talent Officer Hy Pomerance

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    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Amanda Brady and Dustin Laws talk with Hy Pomerance, chief talent officer of Cleary.

  • Rebuttal

    Forced Arbitration Is A Far Worse 'Product' Than Jury Trials

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    Jury trials are not dying because arbitration is a “better product,” as alleged in a recent Law360 guest article, but because corporations have rigged the system through forced arbitration to ensure they cannot be held accountable before a judge or jury, say attorneys at Hagens Berman.