Business of Law

  • February 20, 2018

    Russia, Ukraine Ties Mark Ex-Skadden Atty Snared By Mueller

    Six years ago, Skadden associate Alex van der Zwaan was just one of several junior members of a firm team that wrote a controversial report about the prosecution of an ex-Ukrainian prime minister — a lucrative job arranged by Paul Manafort, now a Russia probe defendant. But van der Zwaan’s client list belies any junior lawyer status.

  • February 20, 2018

    Ex-Skadden Atty Pleads Guilty To Lying In Mueller Probe

    A former Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP lawyer pled guilty Tuesday to lying to officials in Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election.

  • February 20, 2018

    15 Minutes With Discover Financial Services' General Counsel

    Kelly McNamara Corley, who has served as executive vice president, general counsel and secretary of Discover Financial Services since 2008, shared with Law360 how the company prioritizes diversity and inclusion and what keeps her up at night, as technology continues to develop rapidly.

  • February 20, 2018

    Akin Gump Secures Asylum For US Military Interpreter

    Afghan native Abdul Samey Honaryar should not have spent a year detained in the custody of the same government he served as a war zone translator, his Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP attorneys told Law360.

  • February 16, 2018

    In Case You Missed It: Hottest Firms And Stories On Law360

    For those who missed out, here's a look back at the law firms, stories and expert analyses that generated the most buzz on Law360 last week.

  • February 16, 2018

    How To Turn Jurors Into Advocates For Your Case

    It may seem like a nightmare scenario for a trial attorney: giving a closing argument and feeling the majority of the jury is going against you. But trial attorneys say that as long as you know there's one juror committed to your case who's been armed with your arguments, a verdict in your favor is no dream.

  • February 16, 2018

    Up Next At High Court: Double Jeopardy, Self-Incrimination

    The U.S. Supreme Court will enter the underworld of burglars, spouse abusers and drug dealers in its first week back on the bench after a long winter recess, hearing a busy criminal docket presenting constitutional questions around double jeopardy and self-incrimination that are critical to the white collar bar.

  • February 16, 2018

    Convicted Dewey Exec's SEC Deal Hinges On Criminal Appeal

    A settlement between the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and former Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP chief financial officer Joel Sanders, who was convicted of fraud, rests on the outcome of Sanders' criminal appeal, a Manhattan federal judge heard Friday.

  • February 16, 2018

    Law360's Pro Say: What Does 'Partner' Even Mean?

    On the latest episode of Law360's Pro Say podcast, we discuss how law firms are full of people with the title “partner,” but after years of change the title ain’t always what it used to be; a big ruling on the destruction of New York City graffiti space “5Pointz”; a new lawsuit claiming bar prep giant Barbri colluded with top law schools to crush competitors; and Taylor Swift’s efforts to shake off a lawsuit over song lyrics.

  • February 16, 2018

    Ex-Allen & Overy Atty's Psych Exam Story Falls Flat

    Two New York state appeals judges scoffed at a fired Allen & Overy LLP attorney seeking to lift sanctions and revive her sexual harassment suit against the firm at a hearing Friday, hammering the attorney for cutting short a court-ordered psychiatric examination by threatening to have the doctor arrested.

  • February 16, 2018

    GC Cheat Sheet: The Hottest Corporate News Of The Week

    The general counsel for the parent company of Midas received a​ two-year stayed suspension for practicing out of state, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg expressed optimism that the burgeoning #MeToo movement will have a sustained impact,​ and PNC Bank’s general counsel shared with Law360 why he​​ moved in-house after spending much of his career at law firms. These are some of the stories in corporate legal news you may have missed in the past week.​

  • February 16, 2018

    5 Ways Law Firms Can Avoid Lateral Hiring Regret

    Despite valuing lateral hiring as an integral element of their strategies, many law firms are failing to properly screen potential hires and, as a result, are often disappointed when promises made during the interview don't pan out. Here, Law360 looks at five ways firms can avoid lateral hiring remorse.

  • February 15, 2018

    Justice Thomas Not Bitter, But Says Senate Process Broken

    Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas insists he harbors no “bitter feelings” about his scandal-rocked Senate confirmation in 1991, but said Thursday the process has become a gladiator-like “spectacle” that discourages people from serving on the bench.

  • February 15, 2018

    US, UK Officials Blame Russia For 'NotPetya' Cyberattack

    The U.S. and U.K. governments blamed Russia on Thursday for a June 2017 cyberattack that paralyzed part of Ukraine’s infrastructure and wreaked havoc on computers worldwide, including at DLA Piper.

  • February 15, 2018

    7th Circ. Halts Order For Instant Access To Cook County Suits

    One day after a federal judge refused to stay his order requiring the Cook County Circuit Court to make electronically filed suits immediately available to the public, the Seventh Circuit on Wednesday gave Clerk Dorothy Brown time to implement the necessary systems or craft an argument to bypass the order altogether.

  • February 15, 2018

    Law360's Weekly Verdict: Legal Lions & Lambs

    Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP secured the top legal lions spot this week with a win for GrubHub in a bellwether case over how its meal delivery drivers should be categorized, while Reed Smith LLP ended up on the legal lambs list after a federal jury found the law firm's client, Bank of America, illegally blacklisted and defamed a former client manager when it listed her with a fraud reporting agency.

  • February 15, 2018

    What GCs Need To Know That They Don't Learn In Law School

    Whether it's understanding how to clearly communicate legal matters to other executives within a company or decisively making a recommendation, general counsel across various industries agree there are certain key traits involved in their multidisciplinary responsibilities that weren't part of their law school curriculum.

  • February 15, 2018

    Senate Panel OKs Trump 7th Circ. Pick Over Dem Objections

    The Senate Judiciary Committee advanced one of President Donald Trump’s picks for the Seventh Circuit on Thursday, even as Democrats cried foul over the panel ignoring Wisconsin Sen. Tammy Baldwin’s objections to Gass Weber Mullins LLC partner Michael Brennan.

  • February 15, 2018

    A Chat With Hogan Lovells HR Chief Allison Friend

    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts Amanda Brady and Amy Mallow of Major Lindsey & Africa interview law firm management from Am Law 200 firms about how they are navigating an increasingly competitive business environment. The second conversation is with Allison Friend, chief human resources officer for Hogan Lovells LLP.

  • February 14, 2018

    Sailing Looks Clear For 10th Circ., Other Judge Picks

    President Donald Trump’s nominees to the Tenth Circuit and three other federal courts look to have a clear path forward after they laid out their judicial philosophies before a Senate panel Wednesday, their thoughts ranging from giving more time for jury selection to encouraging more “coordination” between district courts and the patent office.

Expert Analysis

  • How Emerging Sources Of ESI Will Impact Discovery

    Charles McGee

    Late last year, the Sedona Conference released the third edition of its principles addressing electronic document production, updated to account for innovations like Snapchat and Twitter. It may be necessary for these principles to be updated more often in order to keep pace with technology, says Charles McGee III of Murphy & McGonigle LLP.

  • Put The Brakes On Acceleration Bay Litigation Funder Ruling

    David Gallagher

    Last week, the District of Delaware raised eyebrows by ruling that documents provided to a litigation funder and its counsel in connection with their due diligence are categorically not attorney work product. Acceleration Bay v. Activision Blizzard seems to be a case of bad facts making bad law, says David Gallagher, investment manager and legal counsel for Bentham IMF.

  • Considerations For Attorneys Using Artificial Intelligence

    Ben Allgrove

    Artificial intelligence tools can empower attorneys to work more efficiently, deepen and broaden their areas of expertise, and provide increased value to clients, which in turn can improve legal transparency, dispute resolution and access to justice. But there are some common pitfalls already apparent in the legal industry, say Ben Allgrove and Yoon Chae of Baker McKenzie.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Duncan Reviews 'Justice And Empathy'

    Judge Allyson Duncan

    In "Justice and Empathy: Toward a Constitutional Ideal," the late Yale Law School professor Robert Burt makes a compelling case for the undeniable role of the courts in protecting the vulnerable and oppressed​. But the question of how the judiciary might conform to Burt’s expectations raises practical problems​, says U.S. Circuit Judge Allyson Duncan of the Fourth Circuit. ​

  • The Art Of The Litigation Funding Deal

    Julia Gewolb

    As litigation funding becomes more widespread, greater complexity and variability in funding deals are to be expected. All claimants should consider certain key questions on the economics of single-case funding when considering or comparing funding terms, says Julia Gewolb of Bentham IMF.

  • Smart Contracts Need Smart Corporate Lawyers

    Matthew O’Toole

    Given the operational and security risks involved, and the substantial digital asset values transacted, the rise of distributed ledger technology and smart contracts will create new opportunities and responsibilities for transactional lawyers, say attorneys with Potter Anderson Corroon LLP.

  • How To Fix Your Broken Client Teams

    Mike O'Horo

    Law firms claim they create client teams to improve service. Clients aren’t fooled, describing these initiatives as “thinly veiled sales campaigns.” Until firms and client teams begin to apply a number of principles consistently, they will continue to fail and further erode clients’ trust, says legal industry coach Mike O’Horo.

  • How To Serve Your Blind Client Effectively

    Julia Satti Cosentino

    While a client’s visual impairment can create challenges for an attorney, it also can open up an opportunity for both attorney and client to learn from each other. By taking steps to better assist clients who are blind or visually impaired, attorneys can become more perceptive and effective advisers overall, say Julia Satti Cosentino and Nicholas Stabile of Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP.

  • Opinion

    Evolving Due Process In The Digital Age

    Stephen Kane

    Because courts have not modernized as quickly as companies like Amazon, Tesla and Apple, Americans are becoming increasingly dissatisfied, but technological innovations may be able to help Americans access their due process, says Stephen Kane of FairClaims.

  • Series

    What I Learned In My First Year: A Judge's Example

    M.C. Sungaila

    Law school taught me how to think like a lawyer, but the district court judge I clerked for my first year out of law school taught me how to be a lawyer. This was the gift she gave to all of her law clerks, in one form or another, says M.C. Sungaila of Haynes and Boone LLP.