Business of Law

  • March 21, 2018

    How They Won It: Jones Day, Orrick Kill Heller Clawback

    Knowing the California Supreme Court’s decision would have broad ramifications for the legal industry, attorneys for Jones Day and Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP beat a clawback bid by the bankruptcy trustee of Heller Ehrman by arguing a core principle: A defunct law firm doesn’t have a property interest in hourly matters continued by a dissolved firm’s former partners.

  • March 21, 2018

    Latham Chair's Road From 'Christian Reconciliation' To Ouster

    The Tuesday resignation of Latham & Watkins Chair Bill Voge was the culmination of a monthslong association with a woman unconnected to the firm that began last September, when Voge volunteered to broker a "Christian reconciliation" between her and a member of a nonprofit where Voge sat on the board.

  • March 21, 2018

    Law Schools Ask 2nd Circ. To Affirm $50M Antitrust Suit Win

    Ten law schools urged the Second Circuit on Wednesday to uphold a lower court’s dismissal of federal antitrust and racketeering claims from a bar exam preparation company’s $50 million suit alleging they conspired to stifle competition for classes targeting foreign Master of Laws graduates, saying the claims weren’t factually supported.

  • March 21, 2018

    Skadden Atty Faces Few Questions In Bid For Posner's Seat

    Skadden partner Michael Y. Scudder Jr. and U.S. District Judge Amy J. St. Eve sailed through their confirmation hearing Wednesday for two Seventh Circuit spots, including one vacated by Richard Posner, answering questions from a handful of senators on the Senate Judiciary Committee.

  • March 20, 2018

    McDermott Memo Reveals Bonuses Beyond Cravath Scale

    McDermott Will & Emery LLP is paying more than half of its associates bonuses higher than the bar set by Cravath Swaine & Moore LLP, exceeding the market rate for young attorney pay by $60,000 or more in some cases, according to a report on Tuesday.

  • March 20, 2018

    Kennedy Scolds Sotomayor At Abortion Case Arguments

    Justice Anthony Kennedy chided Justice Sonia Sotomayor during Tuesday’s U.S. Supreme Court arguments in a closely watched abortion case after she discussed what she found on the website of one of the anti-abortion petitioners, scoffing that he himself didn’t “go beyond the record to look on the internet because I don’t think we should do that.”

  • March 20, 2018

    Attys Wary Of Zero-Tolerance Policies After #MeToo

    Given the current #MeToo environment, a zero-tolerance policy on sexual harassment can seem like the best way to go, but legal experts speaking at an industry panel in New York City on Tuesday argued that such an approach can be rife with potential to backfire.

  • March 21, 2018

    5 Mistakes Millennial Attys Should Avoid On Social Media

    Any attorney can slip up online, as a slew of recent ethical flubs have shown, but millennial attorneys are especially susceptible because of their prolific posting and tweeting. Law360 looks at five of the worst mistakes attorneys can make on social media and how to avoid them.

  • March 20, 2018

    EXCLUSIVE: Behind The Downfall Of Latham's Chairman

    Before his sudden departure Tuesday, Latham & Watkins LLP Chair Bill Voge engaged in a pattern of reckless behavior starting with sexually explicit messages sent to a woman he approached on behalf of a Christian men’s group and culminating in threats to her husband to have her thrown in jail. This story has been updated to include more details.

  • March 20, 2018

    Legal Tech Download: Dow Jones, Ross And Gavelytics

    The world of legal technology is quickly evolving, with new products coming to market in rapid succession. Here, Law360 takes a look at four recent developments.

  • March 19, 2018

    Judge OKs Eagan Avenatti's Exit From Ch. 11

    A California bankruptcy judge has approved a settlement ending the bankruptcy of defunct class action law firm Eagan Avenatti LLP — owned by the attorney representing Stormy Daniels in her legal battle against President Donald Trump — that allows a former partner to collect $4.85 million to resolve his claims of allegedly unpaid fees.

  • March 19, 2018

    Akin Gump Reps Tippee Pro Bono In Insider Trading Case

    Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP has agreed to take up the defense of a computer analyst charged with trading on confidential merger information gleaned from a former Bank of America executive pro bono, according to notices filed Friday in New York federal court.

  • March 19, 2018

    White & Case Reports 24% Gender Pay Gap In London

    White & Case LLP became the first U.S. law firm on Monday to report its gender pay gap data to the U.K. government under a new law, revealing a 24 percent divide between what the average man and average woman earns in its London office.

  • March 19, 2018

    How Female GCs Help Women Advance Their Law Careers

    At the beginning of her career, Helen Browne said she wasn't allowed to wear pants and colleagues often questioned her employment since she was married to a working man. Now, as group general counsel of French multinational insurance firm AXA, she said it's hard to believe how much has changed. Here, Browne and other female GCs share how they're transforming their departments and other women's professional lives.

  • March 19, 2018

    15 Minutes With PayPal’s General Counsel

    Shortly after she joined PayPal in 2015, Wanji Walcott initiated her second pro bono program in the corporate legal realm, this time across the world. Here, the online payment company’s general counsel and senior vice president discusses with Law360 how she explains complicated legal matters to nonlawyers and which book she recommends to attorneys hoping to enhance their craft.

  • March 16, 2018

    In Case You Missed It: Hottest Firms And Stories On Law360

    For those who missed out, here's a look back at the law firms, stories and expert analyses that generated the most buzz on Law360 last week.

  • March 16, 2018

    Law360's Pro Say: A New Legal Weapon In The #MeToo Battle

    On the latest episode of Law360's Pro Say podcast, we discuss how a novel legal approach may place new liability on sex abuse enablers; the White House squashing a proposed $117 billion takeover of chipmaker Qualcomm by a foreign company; the largest agricultural litigation settlement in U.S. history; and a judge who used Shakespeare to write a spirited ruling in a dispute over wine.

  • March 16, 2018

    Ore. Judge Suspended For 'Screen' Of Gay Marriage Couples

    Oregon's highest court on Thursday suspended for three years without pay a judge who instituted a "screen" on gay couples trying to get married in his court and also allowed a convicted felon to handle loaded guns in his presence. 

  • March 16, 2018

    A Chat With Littler Info Chief Durgesh Sharma

    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts at Major Lindsey & Africa interview management from top law firms about navigating an increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Durgesh Sharma, CIO at Littler Mendelson PC.

  • March 16, 2018

    End Legal Monopoly With Antitrust Review, Law Prof Says

    The current system of regulating the legal profession in the United States has created a monopoly that drives prices up and leaves too many people without a lawyer, according to one law professor who suggests that subjecting the sector to federal antitrust law may be the way forward.

Expert Analysis

  • Chief Innovation Officer — The New Star On Legal Teams

    Mark Williamson

    Over the past few years, forward-thinking law firms have expanded their talent pools to include a chief innovation officer, whose responsibilities include spearheading the implementation of technology. It is a smart move, says ​​​​​​​Mark Williamson, co-founder and chief technology officer at Hanzo Archives Ltd.

  • Opinion

    National Lawyers Need National Licensing For National Courts

    EJ Hurst II

    Just last month, a number of legal groups asked the Northern District of California to strike its rule requiring that, before seeking federal court admission, attorneys first be licensed by the state of California. It is irrational to exclude seasoned federal practitioners from general admission due to state bar approval while allowing raw state lawyers who have never been inside a federal courtroom, says attorney EJ Hurst.

  • Lawyering A La Carte: Unbundled Dispute Resolution Services

    David Wallace

    There's no reason for limiting unbundled legal services to family law or even pro se litigants. Wider adoption, especially by litigators, presents an opportunity to correct law's distribution and pricing problem, to make justice practically available to all, and to dethrone litigation as the "sport of kings," says New York-based trial lawyer David Wallace.

  • You’re Perfect, Now Change: Perfectionism Hurts Lawyers

    Peter Norman

    Like medical professionals, lawyers often resist policies to reduce errors due to the culture of perfectionism that permeates the industry. Autonomy is key to the legal professional's prestige and the outward demonstration of competence is key to maintaining autonomy, says Peter Norman of Winnieware LLC.

  • Opinion

    Grassley, Feinstein Debate Judicial Vetting, Obstruction

    Sen. Chuck Grassley

    It is undisputed that in his first year in office President Trump was able to confirm a significant number of judges to the federal bench. How it happened — and whether it's a good thing — are debated here by Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif.

  • 10 Tips For Working With IT To Preserve Data

    John Tredennick

    Increasingly, when courts impose a “legal hold” they require legal supervision of the preservation process, meaning lawyers must rely heavily on information technology professionals to execute the mechanics. John Tredennick of Catalyst Repository Systems and Alon Israely of TotalDiscovery offer insights on how legal and IT can work together to make the process more efficient and fulfill the company’s legal obligations.

  • Protecting Privilege In Litigation Financing Negotiations

    Eric Robinson

    Multiple courts have held that discoverable material from negotiations with a litigation funder, when executed properly, can be attorney work product and immune from disclosure in the later litigation. The recent Acceleration Bay decision is indicative of what happens when difficult facts conflict with best practices, says Eric Robinson of Stevens & Lee PC.

  • Guest Feature

    George Pataki: The Farmer From Peekskill


    In a conversation ranging from Wall Street lawyering to Howard Stern to the shape of the New York Court of Appeals, White and Williams LLP counsel Randy Maniloff sits down with former New York Gov. George Pataki at his office at Norton Rose Fulbright.

  • Why Machine Learning Should Matter To Lawyers

    Dan Puterbaugh

    Legal leaders who want to meet their clients' expanding expectations should start moving their documents to future-ready document management solutions now if they want to stay competitive in the next few years, says Dan Puterbaugh of Adobe Systems Inc.

  • Series

    What I Learned In My 1st Year: Working For Uncle Wally

    Paul Hamburger

    My uncle asked me to research some point of law. I left his office to collect my thoughts, then went back in and asked him a question or two. He looked up and gave me his six-word answer: “Do I look like a library?” He taught me that there are no shortcuts to doing your job, says Paul Hamburger of Proskauer Rose LLP.