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Business of Law

  • August 17, 2018

    Quinn Emanuel Says Ex-Partners Can't Duck Fee Arbitration

    Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP reiterated on Thursday in New York court that its former partners who launched Selendy & Gay PLLC cannot escape arbitrating a dispute over a clause in their partnership agreement requiring them to remit fees earned from clients they took to their new firm.

  • August 17, 2018

    3 Reasons Attys Should Learn A Foreign Language

    Becoming fluent in a foreign language may seem daunting, but the challenge can offer big rewards, including career opportunities and personal satisfaction, for attorneys willing to take it on. Here, Law360 looks at three reasons why lawyers should learn languages other than their own.

  • August 17, 2018

    Law360's Pro Say: Disabled Attys Fight For A Place In BigLaw

    The legal profession can be a lonely place for attorneys with disabilities. They are often overlooked in diversity discussions, and may feel pressure to downplay their disability out of fear of facing bias and stigma. On this week's Pro Say podcast, we dive into these challenges and highlight how disabled attorneys are fighting for their place in the law. 

  • August 16, 2018

    Judge's Wild Order Threatens To Make Warring Attys Kiss

    A Texas federal judge threatened to make opposing attorneys kiss one another at the Alamo, lamented the days when Texas cases were handled by Texas attorneys, quoted Elvis, and generally went off in an order setting a status conference for a trade secret dispute between HouseCanary Inc. and Quicken Loans.

  • August 16, 2018

    Confidential Docs Show Kavanaugh Misled Panel, Dems Claim

    Documents recently turned over to the Senate Judiciary Committee indicate that Judge Brett Kavanaugh “misled” lawmakers during his 2006 confirmation hearing for the D.C. Circuit judgeship about his knowledge of the Bush administration’s torture policies, top Senate Democrats alleged Thursday.

  • August 16, 2018

    Will Law Schools Start Counting ‘Generation ADA’?

    No one is tracking law students with disabilities to see where the education system may be failing them, but some advocates are working to change this dynamic and build a better pipeline.

  • August 16, 2018

    Judge Rips Twombly For Straining Resources In IP Row

    A California federal judge appeared unswayed Thursday by SAP America Inc. and HP Inc.’s arguments that a software company hasn't met the stringent pleading standards required under the U.S. Supreme Court’s Twombly decision, saying Twombly has created more work than it’s saved, and "you get to the point where we’re wasting time and resources when you know what their pleading is."

  • August 16, 2018

    Nat'l Archives Pans Committee's Release Of Kavanaugh Docs

    The National Archives, which has found itself in the middle of a bitter struggle over Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s documents from his Bush White House service, on Wednesday sought to put some distance between its review process and that of the current Senate Judiciary Committee.

  • August 16, 2018

    Law360's Weekly Verdict: Legal Lions & Lambs

    Kicking off the legal lions this week is a team of attorneys who helped secure a $66 million award for client Lumileds LLC in a trade secrets dispute, while the lambs include the remaining members of West Virginia’s Supreme Court, all of whom were impeached this week.

  • August 16, 2018

    Senate Confirms 2 Trump Nominees To 4th Circ.

    The Senate Thursday voted to confirm a pair of Trump nominees to serve on the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, giving favorable votes to federal Judge A. Marvin Quattlebaum and prosecutor Jay Richardson, both of South Carolina.

  • August 16, 2018

    'Indefensible' Fees Request Slashed In ACA Birth Control Row

    In a sternly worded opinion, an Oklahoma federal judge rejected a request for $3.1 million in attorneys' fees from lawyers representing a group of Catholic institutions that sued over Affordable Care Act rules concerning birth control, ruling that the request was "indefensible" and reducing it by more than 75 percent.

  • August 16, 2018

    A Chat With Ogletree Knowledge Chief Patrick DiDomenico

    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Patrick DiDomenico, chief knowledge officer at Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC.

  • August 16, 2018

    Squire Patton Nabs 3 Leaders Of Dissolved IP Boutique

    Squire Patton Boggs LLP has swallowed intellectual property boutique Singularity LLP, snagging a trio of veteran tech litigators from the dissolved boutique as part of the global firm’s efforts to bolster its intellectual property presence in the Bay Area.

  • August 16, 2018

    Mayer Brown Partner's Brother-In-Law Charged With Murder

    Mayer Brown LLP appellate practice leader Stephen Shapiro's brother-in-law had been receiving financial assistance from Shapiro's wife Joan for several months and was told "she would no longer just give him money" in the days before he fatally shot Shapiro and tried to kill her, a state prosecutor told an Illinois state court judge Thursday.

  • August 15, 2018

    Ogletree Must Show Judge Contract In Atty Gender Bias Suit

    A California federal judge said Wednesday that he will need to see Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC's contract with a former nonequity shareholder before deciding whether to transfer her proposed gender bias class action, send it to arbitration or keep it in his court.

  • August 15, 2018

    NRA Atty Faces Scrutiny After Not Disclosing Sanction

    National Rifle Association lawyers will have to answer for the accuracy of a well-known Texas litigator's application to represent it in a dispute with an insurance broker in Virginia federal court, where a judge ordered a hearing on the submission after learning that it didn't mention a past sanction for allegedly trying to influence potential jurors. 

  • August 15, 2018

    Law Firm Leaders: Holland & Knight's Steven Sonberg

    Steven Sonberg has served as managing partner of Holland & Knight LLP for the past 10 years. During that time the law firm has grown significantly, adding 11 offices, increasing its revenue by more than 50 percent and doubling its profits per partner.

  • August 15, 2018

    Thinner ABA Still 'Voice Of All Lawyers,' New Prez Contends

    Newly confirmed American Bar Association President Bob Carlson says his organization, which has faced declining membership, is still the "voice of all lawyers," something he believes entails speaking out against those who "mock due process, mock or ridicule equal justice under the law, and try to marginalize lawyers, judges and the press."

  • August 15, 2018

    Kavanaugh Courts Dem Senators Who Backed Gorsuch

    U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh sat down Wednesday with two more red state Democratic senators who the White House is hoping will once again vote to confirm President Donald Trump’s choice for the nation’s top bench, but it’s unclear if the charm offensive will work this time.

  • August 15, 2018

    Was Kavanaugh Starr's Leaker? Watchdog Wants To Know

    A government transparency group asked the chief judge of the D.C. federal trial court Tuesday to unseal a report allegedly documenting press leaks by Independent Counsel Ken Starr's office in the late 1990s, arguing the public needs to know if U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, one of Starr's deputies, was involved in the alleged misconduct.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Lipez Reviews 'Last Great Colonial Lawyer'

    Judge Kermit Lipez

    In his new book, "The Last Great Colonial Lawyer: The Life and Legacy of Jeremiah Gridley," Charles McKirdy argues that Gridley — someone I had never heard of — was the last great colonial lawyer, and that his cases illuminate his times. The author largely substantiates both claims, says First Circuit Judge Kermit Lipez.

  • Rebuttal

    Judges Can Demand Diversity In Rule 23(g) Applications

    Kellie Lerner

    A recent Law360 guest op-ed criticized the judge in the Chicago Board Options Exchange antitrust litigation for requesting more diversity in plaintiffs’ lead counsel applications. The author’s argument misinterprets the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and reinforces archaic misconceptions about women and minorities in the courtroom, say Kellie Lerner and Chelsea Walcker of Robins Kaplan LLP.

  • Interview Essentials For Attorneys On The Move

    Eileen Decker

    Across the country this fall, recent law school graduates, law firm associates and experienced professionals will interview for positions in private practice and government service. Sharing tips on how to stand out in this high-pressure, hypercompetitive process are Eileen Decker, former U.S. attorney for the Central District of California, and Keith Jacoby, co-chairman of Littler Mendelson PC’s class action practice group.

  • Roundup

    Clerking For Ginsburg

    Clerking For Ginsburg

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg joined the U.S. Supreme Court 25 years ago and is not planning to retire anytime soon — she has hired clerks through 2020. What's it like to assist Justice Ginsburg? In this series, former clerks reflect on the experience.

  • Kavanaugh On Attorney-Client Privilege — 3 Takeaways

    Louis Ramos

    In what may be one of his final acts on the D.C. Circuit, Judge Brett Kavanaugh has written an opinion that may strengthen attorney-client privilege over communications between a company and its in-house counsel. Attorneys at DLA Piper discuss what this holding could mean for the future of the privilege and offer advice for current in-house counsel.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 3 Surprises

    David Post

    It had never occurred to me that judges don’t always love the way their appellate cousins review their work and tell them — in public — all the things they got wrong. I was frequently struck by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s acute awareness of the delicacy of this relationship, says attorney David Post.

  • Employment Litigation And Jury Opinions In A #MeToo World

    Ellen Brickman

    Jurors’ beliefs about social inequality, intergroup differences and disparate treatment are likely to play a role in their evaluations of discrimination and harassment claims, especially in the current political climate. To understand that role better, we undertook a survey of registered voters in New York and Los Angeles, say Ellen Brickman and Chad Lackey of DOAR Inc.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: A Superhero Supreme

    Burden Walker

    As a clerk for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, my job was to mirror my boss’ views and values in everything I did. Years later, I find that I am still striving to live up to the values Justice Ginsburg instilled in me, as both a lawyer and a spouse, says Burden Walker, an assistant U.S. attorney for the District of Maryland.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 4 RBG Lessons On Having It All

    Rachel Wainer Apter

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is everything she is cracked up to be​ — f​eminist icon​, brilliant jurist​, fierce dissenter. She is also an incredible boss, mentor and friend.​ ​Her advice has shaped how I have tried to balance building a career and ​raising children, says Rachel Wainer Apter, counsel to the New Jersey attorney general.

  • Tackling Digital Class Notice With Rule 23 Changes

    Brandon Schwartz

    Proposed modifications to Rule 23 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, scheduled to take effect at the end of this year, will officially recognize the use of electronic notice in class action administrations. Brandon Schwartz and Maggie Ivey of Garden City Group LLC provide guidance on navigating a daunting digital landscape.