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White Collar

  • September 19, 2018

    GM Criminal Case Ends After $900M Deal, 3-Year Oversight

    The U.S. Department of Justice’s criminal claims that General Motors Co. committed wire fraud and made false statements related to a deadly problem with ignition switches were officially dismissed in New York federal court Wednesday after three years of oversight following a $900 million deal.

  • September 19, 2018

    Mass. Doc Dodges Prison After Giving Patient Info To Drug Co.

    A Massachusetts gynecologist will not spend time behind bars for disclosing her patients’ private medical information to a sales representative at Warner Chilcott, then lying about it to federal agents, a federal judge decided Wednesday after prosecutors recommended she spend nearly two years behind bars.

  • September 19, 2018

    Feds Say $364M Consumer Debt Scam Duped Attys, Bankers

    Three men have been arrested for allegedly scamming investors including lawyers, bankers, investment advisers and professional athletes in a $364 million scheme offering high returns on consumer debt, federal prosecutors and securities regulators announced in Maryland on Wednesday.

  • September 19, 2018

    FIFA Bans 3 Officials For Life Following Corruption Pleas

    The international soccer governing body FIFA on Wednesday said its independent ethics committee is imposing lifetime bans on three former officials who copped to various crimes as part of the U.S. government's sprawling crackdown on bribery in international soccer.

  • September 19, 2018

    Calif. Surgeon, Girlfriend Charged With Sexual Assault

    The Orange County district attorney’s office has accused a California surgeon who once appeared on a Bravo dating show and his girlfriend of drugging and sexually assaulting two women, and prosecutors say there may be significantly more victims who haven't come forward.

  • September 19, 2018

    Ex-NYPD Cop Gets 4 Years For ID Theft, Credit Card Fraud

    A 27-year-old former New York City police officer assigned to the transit system's anti-terrorism unit was sentenced Wednesday to four years in prison for a campaign of identity theft and credit card fraud by a Manhattan federal judge who challenged his assertion that he stole out of dire financial need.

  • September 19, 2018

    Ex-Goldman Worker Cops To Insider Trading With NFL Player

    An ex-Goldman Sachs associate pled guilty in Pennsylvania federal court Wednesday to charges that he provided tips about corporate transactions that allowed current Seattle Seahawks linebacker Mychal Kendricks to make stock trades ahead of the deals.

  • September 18, 2018

    Consultant Gets 4 Years For Kickback Scheme At NJ Agency

    A New Jersey federal judge on Tuesday slammed a political consultant with a four-year prison term for her role in a kickback scheme at a defunct Newark water agency, saying she was part of the “inner circle of this tremendous fraud" that ultimately brought down the organization.

  • September 18, 2018

    White House May Swap McGahn For Mueller Point Man

    President Donald Trump’s potential pick for his next White House counsel has been heading up the White House response to the Mueller probe for months, signaling the office could play a larger part in probes into the Trump administration than it did under Don McGahn, who recused himself.

  • September 18, 2018

    Christie Critic Seeks To Revive GWB Scandal Complaint

    Counsel for an activist urged a New Jersey state appellate panel Tuesday to revive his criminal complaint accusing former Gov. Chris Christie of official misconduct over an alleged scheme to reduce local access lanes to the George Washington Bridge for political revenge, saying the prosecutors who dismissed the case had a conflict of interest.

  • September 18, 2018

    Md. Biz Owner Gets 1 Year For Taking From Co.'s 401(k) Plan

    The owner of a Maryland-based company that provided information technology and administrative support to the federal government will serve a year and a day in prison for stealing money from his company’s 401(k) plan, the Employee Benefits Security Administration announced Monday.

  • September 18, 2018

    NJ Man Can't Get Lab Tech Names In $1M Medicare Fraud Row

    A New Jersey federal judge refused to order the government to turn over a list of medical laboratory technicians who are witnesses in a $1 million Medicare fraud case against a lab salesman, siding Tuesday with the government's argument that the request was “entirely inappropriate.”

  • September 18, 2018

    US Loses Bid To DQ Orrick In Fitbit Trade Secrets Case

    A California federal judge on Tuesday denied a request from the government to disqualify Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP from representing an ex-Fitbit Inc. employee accused of stealing trade secrets from a prior employer, since her co-defendants — whom the firm previously represented — said they didn't mind her keeping the firm as counsel.

  • September 18, 2018

    White Collar Atty Rejoins Alston & Bird In DC After DOJ Stint

    Alston & Bird LLP has added a former federal prosecutor as a partner in its Washington, D.C., office, where he started out after law school and worked for eight years before leaving to become a government attorney specializing in white collar crime.

  • September 18, 2018

    Ex-Deutsche Traders Rip Libor Fraud Claims As Trial Begins

    Two former Deutsche Bank AG traders on Tuesday urged a Manhattan federal jury to reject accusations of rigging the London Interbank Offered Rate, claiming prosecutors are attempting to hold them to an unfair standard which was nonexistent during the time in question.

  • September 18, 2018

    Ex-Skadden Partner Denies Role In Manafort Ukraine Lobbying

    Lawyers for former Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP partner Gregory Craig denied Tuesday that he put a controversial report involved in the Paul Manafort prosecution in the hands of U.S. officials.

  • September 18, 2018

    Bar BuzzFeed From Public Figure Defense, Russian Exec Says

    Russian technology executive Aleksej Gubarev asked a Florida federal court Monday to block BuzzFeed from using the public figure defense to fend off his defamation suit over the website’s publication of a dossier alleging ties between Russia and President Donald Trump.

  • September 18, 2018

    Banc Of Calif. Investor Suit Mired In Director Deposition Row

    Banc of California is taking fire from two sides as it seeks to rein in the possibility of seven-hour depositions for four of its directors, with both a class of investors and the bank's former CEO arguing that it has no justification for limiting access to its directors in the class action over its ties to a notorious white collar fraudster.

  • September 18, 2018

    Ore. Pot Biz Owner Gets 7 Months For Federal Tax Crimes

    An Oregon federal court on Monday sentenced a part-owner and operator of medical marijuana dispensaries to seven months in prison and ordered him to pay some $260,000 restitution in what the U.S. Department of Justice calls the first sentencing of a legal marijuana business owner in the state for federal tax crimes.

  • September 18, 2018

    Elon Musk's Take-Private Tweet Draws Tesla Into DOJ Probe

    Tesla said Tuesday that the U.S. Department of Justice is investigating CEO Elon Musk's August tweet suggesting he was poised to take the electric-car maker private, a comment that caused an uproar and the company's stock to soar before Musk made an abrupt about-face under pressure. 

Expert Analysis

  • Q&A

    Back To School: Stanford's Jeff Fisher Talks Supreme Court

    Jeffrey Fisher

    In this series featuring law school luminaries, Stanford Law School professor Jeffrey Fisher discusses his motivation for teaching, arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court and what the court might look like if Judge Brett Kavanaugh is confirmed.

  • Calif.'s New Rules For Lawyers Move Closer To ABA Model

    Mark Loeterman

    The first comprehensive overhaul of California's Rules of Professional Conduct in nearly 30 years becomes operational on Nov. 1. Some of the new rules mirror the model language used by the American Bar Association, but many continue to reflect California’s unique approach to certain ethical questions, says Mark Loeterman of Signature Resolution LLC.

  • Know The Limits To Atty Public Statements During A Trial

    Matthew Giardina

    The balancing act between protecting attorneys’ speech rights and ensuring unbiased adjudications was highlighted recently in two cases — when Michael Cohen applied for a restraining order against Stephanie Clifford's attorney, and when Johnson & Johnson questioned whether a Missouri talc verdict was tainted by public statements from the plaintiffs' counsel, says Matthew Giardina of Manning Gross & Massenburg LLP.

  • Lessons From 5th Circ. Mother-Son Health Care Fraud Case

    Mario Nguyen

    While a lack of intent is a common defense to the prosecution of high-level health care administrators, the Fifth Circuit's decision affirming the convictions of psychologist Rodney Hesson and his mother, Gertrude Parker, shows that there is more than one backdoor for the government to meet its burden, says Mario Nguyen of Locke Lord LLP.

  • In Calif., Questions Remain On Law Firm Conflict Waivers

    Richard Rosensweig

    In Sheppard Mullin v. J-M Manufacturing Co., the California Supreme Court ruled last month that a law firm's failure to disclose a known conflict with another current client did not categorically disentitle the firm from recovering fees. But the court didn’t provide hoped-for guidance on how to write an enforceable advance conflict waiver, says Richard Rosensweig of Goulston & Storrs PC.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Faegre Client Development Chief Melanie Green

    Melanie Green

    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Melanie Green, chief client development officer at Faegre Baker Daniels LLP.

  • DOJ Is Getting Creative, And Aggressive, On Opioids

    Michael Blume

    Last month, the U.S. Department of Justice obtained court orders barring two Ohio doctors from selling controlled substances. The statutory provisions it used are broadly worded, and if past is prologue, the DOJ could be getting ready to demand big changes from any entity that is a part of the opioid supply chain, say Michael Blume and Todd Halpern of Venable LLP.

  • Structuring Investigations In Light Of UK Privilege Case

    Mark Beeley

    The English Court of Appeal's much-anticipated decision in Eurasian Natural Resources Corporation means that companies will continue to face difficulties in obtaining the information they need to investigate suspected wrongdoing, without losing the benefit of legal advice privilege under English law, say Mark Beeley and Rebecca Dipple of Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP.

  • Guest Feature

    Tom Mesereau Talks MJ, Cosby, Unconventional Choices

    Randy Maniloff

    Tom Mesereau may be recently recognizable as one of the attorneys who defended Bill Cosby, but his biggest claim to fame is successfully defending Michael Jackson in 2005. On the eve of what would have been the King of Pop’s 60th birthday, Randy Maniloff, of White and Williams LLP, spoke to Mesereau about his unconventional path to a remarkable career.

  • Can Kavanaugh Be Impeached For Statements To Congress?

    Barbara Radnofsky

    Sitting U.S. senators and a former congressional staffer have accused Judge Brett Kavanaugh of misconduct, including being untruthful in his nomination and confirmation processes for both the D.C. Circuit and the U.S. Supreme Court. Could this subject him to impeachment? Attorney Barbara Radnofsky explores the question through past precedent.