White Collar

  • May 22, 2020

    Law360 Reveals Titans Of The Plaintiffs Bar

    They've represented consumers, companies, and government entities, taken on Goliaths in industries ranging from aerospace to health care to finance to technology to sports, and won landmark victories on behalf of clients across the country.

  • May 24, 2020

    Judge Taps Kavanaugh's Atty To Fight Flynn's Dismissal Bid

    A D.C. federal judge overseeing Michael Flynn's prosecution has hired a high-powered trial attorney to defend his decision to examine the government's request to toss the case, a person familiar with the hiring told Law360 Sunday. 

  • May 22, 2020

    Former ASGN Chief Executive Cops To 'Varsity Blues' Charges

    The former CEO of professional services company ASGN Inc. on Friday agreed to plead guilty in the sprawling "Varsity Blues" college admissions scandal, the same day actress Lori Loughlin and her husband, clothing designer Mossimo Giannulli, formally pled guilty after a year of maintaining their innocence.

  • May 22, 2020

    Law Firms Urged To Move Past Standard Data Breach Scripts

    Law firms should tell clients if their sensitive data has been exposed even if it's unclear whether the law requires them to do so, a new report from a coalition of legal industry stakeholders says.

  • May 22, 2020

    Ex-Bumble Bee CEO Set For June In-Person Sentencing

    A California federal judge outlined new coronavirus-related courtroom protocols on Friday for when he holds an in-person sentencing for Bumble Bee's former CEO next month, saying plexiglass barriers are going up in the courtroom, the hearing will be limited to 10 attendees and all must take elevators individually and wear masks.

  • May 22, 2020

    Feds Rip Ex-Apple Atty's 'Hail Mary' Bid To Nix Criminal Case

    Federal prosecutors on Friday tore into a dismissal bid lodged by a former senior Apple attorney indicted for insider trading, saying the lawyer's argument that the criminal case against him is unconstitutional is the legal equivalent of "a Hail Mary pass."

  • May 22, 2020

    Hollywood Executive Charged With $28M BlackRock Fraud

    Hollywood distribution executive William Sadleir was accused Friday of spiriting some $28 million out of his distribution company — cheating funder BlackRock, which had poured in $75 million — and separately misusing a $1.7 million coronavirus relief payment.

  • May 22, 2020

    Watergate Prosecutors Rip Flynn's Bid To Nix Case At DC Circ.

    Sixteen prosecutors who served on the Watergate Special Prosecution Force slammed former national security adviser Michael Flynn's request that the D.C. Circuit immediately decide whether the government can drop charges against him, saying it's "difficult to imagine a case more ill-suited than this for the 'drastic and extraordinary' remedy."

  • May 22, 2020

    Ex-GE Workers Accused Of Forgery In Angola Energy Deals

    Former General Electric employees are accused of forging and Photoshopping documents related to energy contracts in Angola and undermining a local business partner's $1.1 billion government contracts as part of a cover-up, according to a complaint filed in New York federal court.

  • May 22, 2020

    Calif. Financial Adviser Charged In Alleged $10M Ponzi Scam

    Federal prosecutors have charged and arrested a California-based financial planner and adviser for wire fraud tied to an alleged Ponzi scheme they say he used to dupe 75 victims, mainly senior citizens, into forking over $10 million to invest in securities that didn't exist.

  • May 22, 2020

    Man Charged In Mortgage Fraud Scheme Targeting Elderly

    A California man was charged with organized fraud after impersonating a mortgage fraud investigator and requesting thousands of dollars from senior citizens, the Florida attorney general’s office said Friday.

  • May 22, 2020

    Loan Fraudster Can't Get Out Of Prison Due To Pandemic

    A New Jersey federal judge on Friday refused to release an ex-president of a staffing agency from prison due to the coronavirus pandemic as he serves time for defrauding a lender out of more than $400,000, saying he didn't follow the requisite administrative process through the Bureau of Prisons.

  • May 22, 2020

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen a Puerto Rican lender sue Venezuela's state-run oil company months after inking a settlement over suspicious payments, a Dutch tulip grower take Maersk into court over a cargo shipment and Wilmington Trust face down commercial fraud claims. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • May 22, 2020

    Lori Loughlin, Husband Plead Guilty In 'Varsity Blues'

    Actress Lori Loughlin and her husband, clothing designer Mossimo Giannulli, formally pled guilty in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions case Friday morning after maintaining their innocence for more than a year.

  • May 21, 2020

    Ga. Man Accused Of Lying To Employer That He Had COVID-19

    A Georgia man is being charged with wire fraud after allegedly lying to his employer about testing positive for COVID-19, causing the Fortune 500 company to needlessly stop business at its location and sanitize the workplace, according to a federal criminal complaint unsealed on Thursday.

  • May 21, 2020

    DC Circ. Orders Judge To Respond To Flynn's Bias Claims

    The D.C. Circuit has given U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan 10 days to respond to former national security adviser Michael Flynn's accusations that the judge is "biased" for not allowing the government to drop charges against him.

  • May 21, 2020

    ACLU Helps Inmates File Virus Lawsuits in Texas, Tennessee

    Roughly 2,000 county jail inmates in Texas and Tennessee are seeking help from state and federal judges to force jails to either better enforce social distancing guidelines or release inmates to slow the spread of COVID-19 in detention facilities, according to two lawsuits filed this week.

  • May 21, 2020

    ​​​​​​​Calif. Northern District Postpones Trials

    The Northern District of California's top judge issued an order Thursday postponing or vacating all new criminal jury trials set to begin through June 30 and new civil jury trials scheduled to commence through Sept. 30, citing the continued disruptions to the judicial system caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • May 21, 2020

    DOJ Says Ex-Navy Officer Traded Secrets For Sex And Cash

    A former U.S. Navy officer in South Korea has been accused of detailing how to bypass Navy procedures to funnel business toward a Korean ship company in exchange for bribes including cash and sex workers, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • May 21, 2020

    Ex-Judge Denied Prison Release Despite COVID-19 Fears

    Granting compassionate release to a former Texas state judge convicted of accepting bribes in return for favorable rulings would be a "travesty of justice" despite the considerable health risks he faces in prison due to COVID-19, a federal judge has ruled.

  • May 21, 2020

    Ex-Goldman Banker Cites COVID-19 In Bid To Avoid Prison

    A former Goldman Sachs banker who copped to sharing corporate secrets with a supervisor's acquaintance told a New York federal judge Wednesday that given the pandemic, he should be sentenced to supervised release and a year of community service.

  • May 21, 2020

    Merrill Lynch Traders Can't Avoid Spoofing, Fraud Charges

    An Illinois federal judge refused Wednesday to dismiss indictments against two former Merrill Lynch traders accused of a yearslong scheme to spoof the precious metals futures market, saying prosecutors had adequately argued the traders intended to manipulate the market.

  • May 21, 2020

    NYC Man Hit With Fraud Charges Over $20M In Virus Loans

    Manhattan federal prosecutors brought fraud and false statements charges Thursday against a Chinese national over a purported scheme to get more than $20 million in government-backed loans earmarked for small businesses adversely affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

  • May 21, 2020

    Loughlin's 'Sweetheart Deal' May Spark 'Varsity Blues' Pleas

    The decision by actress Lori Loughlin and her fashion-designer husband to plead guilty in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions case after losing a motion to dismiss could lead other wealthy parents to throw in the towel in hopes of also securing what one expert called a "sweetheart deal."

  • May 21, 2020

    Philly Prisoners Slam 'Head-In-The-Sand' Virus Response

    Citing a woeful lack of testing for COVID-19 cases at the facility, three prisoners petitioning for a broad release of inmates from Philadelphia's federal detention center on Wednesday blasted the "head-in-the-sand approach" they say prison officials have taken in response to the pandemic.

Expert Analysis

  • Human Rights Are Becoming A Compliance Issue

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    A recent commitment from the European Union's commissioner for justice to introduce rules for mandatory corporate human rights due diligence next year may signal the arrival of this issue as a global business imperative, making it as fundamental as anti-corruption diligence, say attorneys at Paul Hastings.

  • How CFTC's Agricultural Enforcement May Evolve Amid Crisis

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    The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission recently singled out agricultural commodities market manipulation as an area of focus, potentially representing a return to the agency’s core mission that could shape enforcement during the current crisis, say attorneys at Latham.

  • Opinion

    Flynn Contempt Inquiry Is Vital To Judicial Independence

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    The D.C. Circuit should uphold the district court's authority to investigate whether Michael Flynn acted in criminal contempt, which is important for affirming judicial independence in this era of partisan prosecuting, says Harold Krent at Chicago-Kent College of Law.

  • Federal Program Bribery Law May Reach PPP Loan Recipients

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    Public and private entities receiving funds under the Paycheck Protection Program, and others engaged in business transactions with them, should be aware of potential criminal liability under the federal program theft and bribery statute — as the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 2000 regarding Medicare, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn.

  • A Lawyer's Guide To Client Service Continuity Planning

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    Ensuring uninterrupted client service and compliance with ethical obligations in a time when attorneys are more likely to fall ill means taking six basic — yet often ignored — steps to build some redundancy and internal communication into legal practice, say attorneys at Axinn.

  • A New Approach To OFAC's Rejected-Transactions Reporting

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    Alexandre Lamy at Baker McKenzie proposes a common-sense framework for nonfinance companies, which in 2019 became subject to the Office of Foreign Assets Control's rejected-transaction reporting requirements, but have received little guidance about how to comply.

  • FIRREA: A Powerful Enforcement Tool To Combat PPP Fraud

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    As the Paycheck Protection Program provides federal coronavirus relief funding through a variety of financial institutions, the U.S. Department of Justice will certainly look closely at the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act — with its lengthy limitations period and statutory penalties — when contemplating enforcement measures, says Peter Hyun at Wiley.

  • Virtual Meetings Could Be Fertile Ground For Legal Discovery

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    Many remote meeting technologies include recording features as default settings, raising three primary concerns from a legal discovery and data retention perspective, and possibly bringing unintended consequences for companies in future litigation, says Courtney Murphy at Clark Hill.

  • Bridgegate Has The Potential To Upend A Raft Of Prosecutions

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent "Bridgegate" decision will undoubtedly create further hurdles for the government to prosecute schemes that are venal, deceitful and underhanded but in which the loss of money or property — while foreseeable — was not the objective, say Daniel Fetterman and Brian Choi at Kasowitz.

  • Opinion

    9 Ways To Improve The Paycheck Protection Program

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    The CARES Act's well-intentioned Paycheck Protection Program has problems, and Congress should take steps to better protect small businesses and define several terms that continue to cause confusion, says Samantha Block, a judicial clerk at the U.S. Court of Federal Claims.

  • Opinion

    Flynn Judge Should Not Change Role Of Amicus Curiae

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    As an appellate attorney who has authored numerous amicus briefs, I am deeply concerned about some fast-moving developments in the case of former Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn, where a D.C. federal judge is transforming amici curiae into 11th-hour prosecutorial intermeddlers, says Lawrence Ebner at Capital Appellate.

  • The Role Of Remote Mediation After The Crisis Is Over

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    When the dark cloud of COVID-19 has passed and resolution centers are once again peopled with warring parties and aspiring peacemakers, remote mediations will likely still be common, but they are not going to be a panacea for all that ails the dispute resolution industry, says Mitch Orpett at Tribler Orpett.

  • Trapping Interpol Misuse: Inside The Proposed TRAP Act

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    If the Transnational Repression Accountability and Prevention Act is enacted into law, it could lead to increased controls and transparency in the Interpol notice and diffusion processes, and would likely scale back some of the U.S. immigration policies that appear to acquiesce to Interpol, say attorneys at Kobre & Kim.

  • 7 Steps To Romancing The Virtual Classroom

    Excerpt from Lexis Practice Advisor
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    For professors, trainers, lawyers, students and businesses grappling with the unexpected challenges of distance learning, trial attorney and teacher James Wagstaffe offers best practices for real-time online instruction.

  • Bankruptcy Fraud Prosecutions May Increase Post-Pandemic

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    While prosecutors have rarely pursued criminal bankruptcy fraud allegations against companies and executives, investigations invariably follow the money in pursuit of alleged fraud and thus bankruptcy is a natural area of focus in a financial crisis, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

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