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White Collar

  • November 16, 2018

    NY Says Funding Ban For Sanctuary Locales Unconstitutional

    The state of New York, along with several other jurisdictions, pressed a Manhattan federal judge Friday to issue a nationwide injunction blocking the Trump administration from cutting off law enforcement funding for so-called sanctuary jurisdictions, arguing new conditions for the funds are unlawful and unconstitutional.

  • November 16, 2018

    Acting AG Challenged At High Court By Felon Seeking Firearm

    An ex-convict who is challenging a federal ban on gun ownership by felons asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday to determine the legitimacy of acting U.S. Attorney General Matthew Whitaker, claiming that the controversial appointment was unconstitutional and that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, not Whitaker, should be the named defendant in his case.

  • November 16, 2018

    Madoff Trustee Asks 2nd Circ. To Back Foreign Clawback Bids

    The trustee for Bernie Madoff’s fraudulent investment firm asked the Second Circuit on Friday to allow him to claw back Ponzi scheme proceeds transferred from foreign Madoff feeder funds, saying the efforts are a domestic application of U.S. law even if the money was sent overseas.

  • November 16, 2018

    NY Atty Pleads Not Guilty To Fatally Shooting Daughter's Mom

    A New York City attorney pled not guilty Friday in New Jersey state court to charges of fatally shooting the mother of his daughter in their New Jersey home last month before allegedly fleeing to Cuba, while his lawyer called on prosecutors to turn over additional discovery about the case.

  • November 16, 2018

    Accountant Denied Retrial Over $18M Biotech VC Fraud

    A California federal judge declined Thursday to order a retrial for an accountant found guilty of helping a venture capitalist siphon $18 million from a fund using false tax returns.

  • November 16, 2018

    Meet The Judge Who Controls Fate Of ACA, Trump's AG

    The Maryland federal judge in the extraordinary position to decide the future of both the Affordable Care Act and President Donald Trump’s acting U.S. attorney general is an evenhanded and genial jurist known for exhaustively analyzing legal issues, lawyers say.

  • November 16, 2018

    Texas Man Convicted In $36M Drug Resale Scheme

    A Texas federal court jury has convicted a Texas man of tax evasion and money laundering conspiracy for selling used prescription medications to a company that would resell them to pharmacies as new.

  • November 16, 2018

    Fla. Judge Told To Step Aside Over Prosecutor Past

    The Florida Supreme Court has ruled that a trial court judge should have recused herself from hearing a post-conviction motion by a man on death row, noting that she had been one of several prosecutors collaborating on death penalty cases at the time he was convicted.

  • November 16, 2018

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen a new suit against Credit Suisse over debt investment, Kuwait's social security agency take on Man Group, and Allianz and several food distributors sue one of the world's biggest container shipping companies. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • November 16, 2018

    Fla. Judge To Be Reprimanded Over Recommendation Letter

    The Florida Supreme Court has approved a public reprimand for a Miami judge who wrote a character reference letter on behalf of a man awaiting federal court sentencing for his role in a $63 million Medicare kickback scheme.

  • November 16, 2018

    Feds' Late Evidence Causes Mistrial In $16M Fraud Suit

    The fraud trial of a former U.S. Department of Defense official and a government contractor accused of partaking in a $15.7 million kickback scheme will have to start over, a Virginia federal judge has ruled, finding the men might've switched up their trial tactics if they had had time to review thousands of documents prosecutors revealed midtrial.

  • November 15, 2018

    Dewey Drama Takes Unexpected Twist With Ex-CFO's Jailing

    The long saga of failed BigLaw firm Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP took another dramatic twist Thursday when a New York judge threw the firm's former chief financial officer in jail briefly for not paying his $1 million criminal fine, leaving some lawyers shocked.

  • November 15, 2018

    US Must Use 'Full Toolkit' To Fight Cybercrime: Ex-DOJ Chief

    John P. Carlin, who ran the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Security Division before going into private practice, tells Law360 how a deterrence campaign can help America win its "code war" against Russia, China, North Korea and Iran. He also shares advice for firms deciding whether to tell authorities about cyberattacks.

  • November 15, 2018

    Biblical University Leaders Indicted In Newsweek Fraud Case

    Two leaders at a biblical university were charged alongside two media owners Thursday in Manhattan trial court with fraudulently obtaining $35 million in loans intended for computer upgrades and instead using the money to keep afloat their organizations, including Newsweek.

  • November 15, 2018

    Russian Co. Can't Duck Election Interference Indictment

    A D.C. federal judge ruled Thursday that a Russian company cannot escape an indictment from the U.S. Office of Special Counsel accusing it of conspiring to influence the outcome of the 2016 elections, saying there is sufficient evidence to support the charge of conspiracy to defraud the United States.

  • November 15, 2018

    PE Firm's Head Gets New Trial In $60M Tribal Bond Scam Case

    A former private equity firm director convicted of conspiring to defraud pensioners and a Native American tribe of more than $60 million through the issuance of tribal bonds was granted a new trial Thursday after a New York federal judge expressed doubts about his awareness of the fraud scheme.

  • November 15, 2018

    Ex-Deutsche Bank Traders Say Spoofing Isn’t Wire Fraud

    Two former traders at Deutsche Bank urged an Illinois federal court Wednesday to dismiss the government's allegations that a spoofing scheme constituted wire fraud, saying they didn't make any false statements or material misrepresentations.

  • November 15, 2018

    DOJ Sharpens Gov't Fraud Focus, Adds Merger Review Clarity

    The U.S. Department of Justice will sharpen its focus on bringing competition cases in which the government itself has been defrauded by bid-rigging and similar conduct, DOJ Antitrust Division head Makan Delrahim said in a speech Thursday, adding that the agency would seek triple damages when defendants refuse to settle.

  • November 15, 2018

    Chuhak Must Face Ex-NFL Players' Tax Scheme Claims

    A group of retired NFL players who claim they were burned by a fraudulent tax scheme cooked up by lawyers at Chuhak & Tecson PC can proceed with professional negligence and civil conspiracy claims against the attorneys and the firm, a Florida federal judge ruled Wednesday.

  • November 15, 2018

    Inside Trader Avoids Prison Time After Aiding Feds

    A Florida trader dodged prison time for his admitted role in an illicit stock trading operation Thursday when a New Jersey federal judge sentenced him to three years of probation instead, citing his cooperation as a government witness who helped prosecutors net a co-conspirator in the case.

Expert Analysis

  • Rise Of The CMOs

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    Joshua Peck, incoming marketing director of Hill Wallack LLP, traces the evolution of the chief marketing officer position at law firms and shares insights from three legal marketing pioneers.

  • A Victory For Legal Privilege In Cross-Border Investigations

    Antonia Apps

    The U.K. Court of Appeal's recent decision in Serious Fraud Office v. Eurasian Natural Resources is a substantial step toward confirming the application of legal privilege in internal investigations, and has significantly reduced the divergence in U.K. and U.S. privilege law, say attorneys with Milbank Tweed Hadley & McCloy LLP.

  • NCAA Corruption And The 'Right To Control' Theory

    Kan Nawaday

    The convictions in U.S. v. Gatto for defrauding NCAA schools have shined a spotlight on the relatively obscure — but powerful — “right to control” theory of federal wire and mail fraud liability, which formed the basis for the New York federal prosecutors' case, say Kan Nawaday and Stephen Salsbury of Venable LLP.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Bryan Cave Innovation Chief Katie DeBord

    Katie DeBord

    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Katie DeBord, chief innovation officer at Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP.

  • Simple Secrets For Improving Your CLE

    Daniel Karon

    With few cases going to trial, many attorneys keep their oral-presentation skills sharp by teaching continuing legal education programs. To avoid giving a CLE that falls flat and damages your reputation, you must fashion a thoughtful message, control its presentation, and nail the beginning and ending, says Daniel Karon of Karon LLC.

  • It’s Time For Law Firms To Start Talking About Gen Z

    Eliza Stoker

    Since the oldest members of Generation Z aren’t even finished with law school yet, law firm management is in a unique position to prepare for their entrance into the legal workforce, says Eliza Stoker of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • Guest Feature

    The Many Lives Of Michael Chertoff

    Randy Maniloff

    Randy Maniloff begins his interview with the nation’s second secretary of homeland security by saying he wants to go over his resume. The look on Michael Chertoff's face: “Bring it on.”

  • DOJ's Yates Memo Has Little Effect On Antitrust Division

    Eric Meiring

    Since the Yates memo on individual accountability for corporate crimes was issued in 2015, the overall number of criminal antitrust cases is down significantly, and the prosecutions of Steppig, Maruyasu and Lischewski illustrate the policy's lack of lasting impact, say Eric Meiring and Brandon Duke of Winston & Strawn LLP.

  • What To Expect From New Democratic Investigation Efforts

    Reginald Brown

    The new Democratic House majority is expected to direct much of its attention to executive branch oversight and accountability. Companies and their legal counsel should be prepared for a dramatically changed collateral environment as investigations cover a wide range of topics, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: Yale's Linda Greenhouse Talks Journalism

    Linda Greenhouse

    In this series featuring law school luminaries, Yale Law School lecturer and Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Linda Greenhouse discusses her coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court, the conservatives' long game and trends in journalism.