White Collar

  • April 16, 2021

    SDNY Judge Refuses To Toss Ghislaine Maxwell Indictment

    Ghislaine Maxwell can't escape an indictment accusing her of enticing minors to travel for illegal sex acts with the late Jeffrey Epstein, a New York federal judge ruled Friday, rejecting Maxwell's arguments that she should be spared under a non-prosecution agreement between Epstein and the Southern District of Florida.

  • April 16, 2021

    Businessman Avoids Prison For Petroecuador Bribes

    A New York federal judge on Friday sentenced the owner of an oil and gas services company to probation over a bribery and money laundering scheme involving the payments of millions of dollars to officials of Petroecuador.

  • April 16, 2021

    China Bank Unit Faces Ponzi Scheme Suit Over $46.5M Loss

    A Canada-based investment firm has sued the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Financial Services LLC in New York state court, accusing ICBC of looking the other way while an alleged Ponzi schemer used her accounts there to orchestrate a $100 million investment scam.

  • April 16, 2021

    Ex-Katten Atty's Retirement Accounts Can Be Garnished

    A New York federal judge said Friday that retirement accounts belonging to the former Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP attorney convicted over his representation of "Pharma Bro" Martin Shkreli are fair game for garnishment to satisfy a $10.4 million restitution order.

  • April 16, 2021

    Quinn Emanuel, Other Firms Sue MiMedx Over Legal Fees

    Quinn Emanuel and two other law firms have sued MiMedx in New York state court over millions of dollars in allegedly unpaid legal fees owed for the defense of two company executives in a criminal securities fraud case.

  • April 16, 2021

    Witness In Ex-Netflix Exec Bribery Trial Has COVID, Jury Told

    A California federal judge told jurors Friday that a witness who testified recently in an in-person bribery trial against a former Netflix executive has been diagnosed with COVID-19 and was asymptomatic, adding that the witness had been vaccinated a week earlier.

  • April 16, 2021

    NY Fed. Judge Won't Release Hoops Trial Docs For Civil Suit

    A New York federal judge will not allow an aspiring marketing manager convicted in the college basketball corruption probe to disclose emails with the father of a former University of Louisville recruit that he says show that the father was part of the scandal for use in a related civil case by the recruit. 

  • April 16, 2021

    Ex-Flynn Partner Asks Full 4th Circ. For New FARA Trial

    Bijan Rafiekian — a onetime business partner of former Trump adviser Michael Flynn — is asking the full Fourth Circuit to reconsider his conviction for foreign lobbying, which was reinstated on appeal, saying the previous decision would stack the deck against defendants in foreign agent registration cases.

  • April 16, 2021

    Cybercrime Group Member Gets 10 Years For Hacking US Cos.

    A top member of an international cybercrime group known as FIN7 was sentenced Friday to 10 years in prison and ordered to pay $2.5 million in restitution for his role in hacking hundreds of U.S. firms that the government estimates caused at least $100 million in actual losses and potentially over $1 billion.

  • April 16, 2021

    Feds Say Ex-Atty's Lies In GM Settlement Scam Merit Prison

    A former California lawyer who lied to a Manhattan federal judge in an attempt to disguise his role in an alleged scheme to cash in on a fake $16.5 million General Motors injury settlement deserves prison, prosecutors said Thursday.

  • April 16, 2021

    FINRA Fines Trading Firm $250K For Alleged AML Failures

    The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority fined Score Priority Corp. $250,000 based on findings that the electronic trading platform failed to establish an anti-money laundering program over a four-year period, allowing potentially suspicious trading out of accounts based in China and other foreign jurisdictions.

  • April 16, 2021

    Atty Petitions Fla. Appeals Court Over Masked Testimony Rule

    A Miami trial attorney is appealing a decision by a Miami-Dade circuit judge that overruled a pretrial objection to requiring witnesses at in-person jury trials to wear masks.  

  • April 16, 2021

    Ex-Temple Biz School Dean Charged In Ratings Scandal

    Federal prosecutors on Friday accused the ousted former dean of Temple University's business school of masterminding a scheme to share false information about the school's online MBA program in order to artificially inflate its annual ranking from U.S. News & World Report.

  • April 16, 2021

    Donziger Wants His Trial Televised, Citing Chauvin Case

    Disbarred attorney Steven Donziger wants his upcoming criminal contempt trial televised, citing Derek Chauvin's televised state court murder trial in his request on Thursday to override rules barring cameras in federal courtrooms.

  • April 16, 2021

    Roger Stone, Wife Owe $2M Tax Debt, Feds Say

    Roger Stone, an associate of former President Donald Trump, and his wife owe late taxes, penalties and interest totaling nearly $2 million, according to a suit the U.S. government filed Friday in a Florida federal court.

  • April 16, 2021

    Atty Charged With Laundering Cash In DEA Sting Operation

    A Dallas attorney has been arrested and charged with money laundering after doing business with an undercover Drug Enforcement Administration agent posing as a drug trafficker, federal prosecutors announced Friday.

  • April 16, 2021

    Fla. Businessman Says Ex-Partner's RICO Claims 'Absurd'

    A Florida businessman has urged sanctions against his former partner in a real estate deal near Orlando International Airport, claiming the ex-partner and his counsel brought frivolous racketeering claims meant to avoid having to pay out on a multimillion-dollar jury verdict.

  • April 16, 2021

    Ex-Mayer Brown Securities Head Joins Vedder Price In DC

    Vedder Price PC has added the former co-head of Mayer Brown LLP's securities litigation and enforcement practice as a shareholder in its government investigations and white collar group in Washington, D.C., the firm has announced.

  • April 16, 2021

    Ex-Duane Morris Partner Joins Faegre Drinker Litigation Team

    Faegre Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP's new partner Oderah C. Nwaeze is excited to help grow the firm's corporate practice in Delaware, a venue he said he loves litigating matters in because of the high standards expected of its attorneys.

  • April 16, 2021

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen two legal firms accused of colluding on patent renewal fees, a sports streaming service sue Vodafone in Italy, and major supermarkets slug it out over the design of a caterpillar cake. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • April 15, 2021

    Madoff's 'Seismic Shift' On SEC, Compliance Still Felt Today

    Word of Bernie Madoff's death on Wednesday brought back painful memories of a Ponzi scheme that not only swindled investors out of billions but also blindsided and embarrassed regulators, prompting sweeping reforms of how they policed the investment industry.

  • April 15, 2021

    11th Circ. Says Epstein Victims Can't Bring CVRA Suit

    The full Eleventh Circuit ruled Thursday that the Crime Victims' Rights Act does not give victims the right to sue if no criminal charges were ever filed, foreclosing a lawsuit by an alleged victim of billionaire sex offender Jeffrey Epstein claiming the government violated the law by keeping his victims in the dark about a nonprosecution agreement.

  • April 15, 2021

    Feds Say Huawei Defied Order, Shared Info With Fugitive CFO

    Federal prosecutors told a New York federal judge that Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd.'s attorneys have violated the terms of a protective order by publicly discussing sensitive documents and sharing discovery with fugitive Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou.

  • April 15, 2021

    Biden DOJ Transition Slowed By GOP, Garland Pushback

    Partisan gridlock and friction between the White House and Attorney General Merrick Garland over key appointees are contributing to a slow U.S. Department of Justice transition, according to experts and sources familiar with the matter, threatening to keep politically sensitive investigations and policy rollouts on ice in the coming months.

  • April 15, 2021

    Ex-Salvadoran Soccer Boss Out On Bail After Months In Jail

    A former head of the Salvadoran soccer federation was ordered Thursday to be released on bail, following his arrest in the U.S. in January for corruption charges brought in connection with Brooklyn federal prosecutors' wide-ranging FIFA bribery probe.

Expert Analysis

  • Prepare For Global Collaboration In Crypto Tax Enforcement

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    Recent Internal Revenue Service victories involving John Doe summonses served on cryptocurrency exchanges — and statements by the Joint Chiefs of Global Tax Enforcement about global collaboration in cryptocurrency-related tax investigations — should prompt assessment of prior virtual currency transactions and remediation before an enforcement agency shows up at the door, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • Lessons From Federal Fraud Charges Against UBiome

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's and U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's recent fraud allegations against uBiome executives illustrate the challenges of navigating interactions between clinical testing companies, health insurers and government oversight efforts, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Why The Future Law Firm Model Is Industry-Based Offerings

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    Multidisciplinary, industry-based groups at law firms allow for more holistic legal advice, lead to sustainable client relationships, and are likely to replace practice group monoliths at many firms, say Jennifer Simpson Carr at Furia Rubel, Timothy Corcoran at Corcoran Consulting and Mike Mellor at Pryor Cashman.

  • Beware Sunny Days: Lessons From BP's 2005 Texas Blast

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    The 16th anniversary of the massive explosion at BP's Texas City refinery is an occasion to remember that when companies grow complacent about favorable safety metrics, they leave themselves open to disaster — and to the civil and criminal liability that may follow, says Gerry Caron, chief counsel for safety, health and environment at Cabot.

  • Opinion

    DOJ Accountability Bill Is Flawed And Inadequate

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    The proposed Inspector General Access Act that would allow the U.S. Department of Justice inspector general to investigate allegations of misconduct by DOJ attorneys would do little to increase accountability, and could undermine decades of practiced procedure at the Office of Professional Responsibility, says Steven Wasserman at the National Association of Assistant United States Attorneys.

  • Enforcement Takeaways From ABA Antitrust Meeting

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    Although many are calling for sweeping changes to antitrust laws, virtual sessions of the American Bar Association's 69th Antitrust Law Spring Meeting reveal that state and federal enforcers are already able to challenge big tech, acquisitions of small, nascent competitors, and wage-fixing and no-poach agreements, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Thought Leadership's Critical Role In Law Firm Diversity

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    Minority attorneys are often underrepresented in conferences, media interviews and other law firm thought leadership campaigns, which affects their visibility with potential clients and their ability to advance at their firms, says John Hellerman at Hellerman Communications.

  • Opinion

    US Antitrust Regulators Should Foster Climate Collaboration

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    U.S. regulators should follow the lead of their European counterparts and clarify how antitrust law applies to cooperation between companies on fighting climate change, so that businesses have more flexibility to work together on green initiatives, say Ben Steinberg and Adam Mendel at Robins Kaplan.

  • Where Health Care Enforcement Is Headed Under Biden

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    Early actions by President Joe Biden's administration signal a robust health care enforcement environment in which federal agencies will aggressively scrutinize pandemic-related and Medicare Advantage fraud, nursing homes, and medical technology, and False Claims Act activity will likely increase, say attorneys at Alston & Bird.

  • What Associates Should Consider Before Switching Practices

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    The current high demand for midlevel associates provides them a rare opportunity to potentially explore new practice areas, but associates should first ask themselves six questions to begin figuring out why a change sounds appealing, says Stephanie Biderman at Major Lindsey.

  • 3 Reasons Securities Fraud Litigation Exposure Fell In Q1

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    Nessim Mezrahi and Stephen Sigrist at SAR analyze data on securities class actions filed against public companies in the first quarter of 2021, and explore factors that may have contributed to issuers facing their lowest exposure to such claims in years.

  • Mitigating Anti-Kickback Risks Of Health Tech Stock Warrants

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    While stock warrants are a practical way for the health technology industry to finance growth, companies should utilize statutory safe harbors to mitigate federal Anti-Kickback Statute compliance risks, which could arise from an improperly structured arrangement that encourages referral of business to a vendor, say Meenakshi Datta and Jon Zucker at Sidley.

  • 4 Effective Ways To Prioritize Client Advocacy

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    To truly support a client going through a complicated lawsuit or a painful experience, lawyers must think beyond interpreting legal guidelines and navigating court proceedings, says attorney Scott Corwin.

  • A Call For Greater Clarity Around SEC Cooperation Credit

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s decision not to fine Gulfport Energy in a recent enforcement action over disclosure failures highlights the need for SEC guidance on the benefits a company will receive for cooperating with agency investigations, say Robert Cohen and Brook Jackling at Davis Polk.

  • Remote Law Firm Culture Should Prioritize Associate Training

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    Due to the pandemic, the gap between law school and the first day on the job has never been wider, but law firms can leverage training to bridge that intimidating gap and convey the unique value of their culture in a virtual environment, say Melissa Schwind at Ward and Smith, and William Kenney and Jaron Luttich at Element Standard.

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